Sep
12
    
Posted (Lori) in News

NOTE FROM STONELEDGE

Dear CSA Member,

Below is your updated list for tomorrow along with a great recipes and tips on how to use your cranberry beans.

Tips for using your Cranberry Beans-

Remove the rubber band from the bunch of dry beans.

Pick off all the pods

Open pod and take out the bean : )

Try this great fresh cranberry bean Fagiloi Recipe:  Click Here

All you need to know for Cranberry Beans (cooking, storing and preparing):  Click Here

Enjoy!

-Candice

1 bunch Cutting Celery

1 bunch  Vermont Cranberry Beans (Heirloom Variety)

1 bunch Carrots

2 Shallots

1 bunch Red Russian Kale

1 bunch Red Ace Beets

1 Sweet Pepper

2 Tomatoes

2 Serrano Peppers

1 head Romanesco Cauliflower

Optional Shares this week

Mushroom Share: Grown by Bulich Mushroom Farm

Crimini

Fruit Share: Grown by Fix Brother Orchard

1 bag- Gala Apples & Bartlett Pears

Stoneledge Farm LLC

info@stoneledge.farm

www.stoneledge.farm

Mailing Address Only:

359 Ross Ruland Road

South Cairo, NY 12482

LIKE us at https://www.facebook.com/StoneledgeFarm


 
Sep
12
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Cauliflower and Romanesco Cauliflower
CAULIFLOWER; scroll down for specific Romanesco info—but Romanesco can be used in any cauliflower recipe.
I’ve seen several recipes that use cauliflower as “mock mashed potatoes”—cooking it until it loses its crunch and texture and then mashing it. I find it offensive to both the cauliflower and the potato—cauliflower has its own advantages, but it’s not a potato.
It’s not easy to face down a cauliflower. It usually doesn’t break apart as easily as a head of broccoli and needs a sharp knife to cut it into bite-sized pieces, The core and leaves have to be cut away and composted, though the stems are just as good as the flowers.
Cauliflower can be boiled or steamed to soften it—but my choice is raw, cooked lightly, or roasted.
Raw, it does well in a marinade, as below, or as a crudite with any dip or dunk. If you’re not a fan of very crunchy vegetables, cook it briefly before marinating, as in the salad below. There are also instructions for roasting below. Cauliflower is also great in a gratin, often mixed with broccoli. See general gratin instructions in Recipes from America’s Small Farms, p. 25. And there’s a more complicated Cauliflower Cheese Pie on p. 74.
CURRIED WINTER STEW WITH CAULIFLOWER AND WINTER SQUASH
This recipe appeared in the NYT (David Tanis) late last fall and it became one of my favorites instantly. It uses only one pan (plus whatever you cook the chickpeas in) and is a full meal, especially if you add rice and raita. I have not included the raita recipe because it was not especially great and took a lot of work—raita is easy, just add diced vegetables (radish is perfect, cucumber is good too) to yogurt. They suggest apple, which was just ok. Add curry powder, cayenne, diced hot pepper, or hot sauce. Mix the whole thing up, allow to sit in the refrigerator and bit and serve cold.
The first time I made this recipe, I followed it exactly, using the spice seeds and individual ground spices. I found the spice was too weak overall; now I just use pre-mixed curry powder. I start with a tablespoon and keep adding until it tastes right. I also add chopped greens to the stew, at the same time as the chickpeas—and sometimes string beans as well..
3 tablespoons untoasted sesame oil or vegetable oil
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon coriander seeds
½ teaspoon turmeric
¼ teaspoon cayenne
1 2-inch piece of ginger, grated
6 small garlic cloves, minced
4 small hot red Asian chiles or Mexican chiles de árbol
1 large onion, diced, about 2 cups
Salt and pepper
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 cups delicata squash, unpeeled, in 1-inch slices, or butternut squash, peeled, in 1-inch cubes
1 cup parsnips, hard center core removed, in 1-inch slices or chunks
½ pound tiny potatoes, such as fingerlings, halved
2 cups small florets of cauliflower
1 cup cooked chickpeas, preferably home-cooked and the liquid reserved
Cilantro sprigs, for garnish
Steamed basmati rice (optional)
Apple raita (optional),
PREPARATION
1. Put oil in a wide, heavy pot over medium-high heat. When oil is wavy, add cumin seeds and coriander seeds and let sizzle for about 1 minute. Add turmeric, cayenne, ginger, garlic and chiles and stir to coat.
2. Add onion and season generously with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until softened and lightly colored, about 10 minutes. Add tomato paste and stir to coat. Add squash, parsnips and potatoes, salt lightly, then add 3 cups chickpea cooking liquid or water, or enough to just cover vegetables. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a brisk simmer. Cover and cook until vegetables are tender but firm, about 15 minutes.
3. Add cauliflower and chickpeas and stir gently to combine. Cover and continue cooking 5 to 8 minutes more, until cauliflower is tender. Taste broth and adjust seasoning, then transfer to a wide, deep serving platter or bowl. Garnish with cilantro sprigs. Serve with steamed basmati rice and apple raita, if desired.
MARINATED CAULIFLOWER SALAD
From Martha Stewart Living
1 large head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into small florets
1/4 cup white-wine vinegar
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons brine-packed capers, drained and rinsed
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Blanch cauliflower until just tender, about 2 minutes; work in batches if your pot is not big enough. Drain; transfer to a bowl.
Whisk together vinegar, onion, and mustard in a small bowl. Pour in oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over warm cauliflower, and add capers and parsley. Stir to combine.
Cover, and refrigerate overnight or up to 1 day. Serve chilled or at room temperature.
Roasted Cauliflower with Almonds and Kalamata Olives
5-6 cups of cauliflower florets
2 tbs olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbs lemon juice; and 1 tbs zest from an organic lemon
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup crumbled goat or feta cheese (if desired)
¼ cup blanched or slivered almonds, toasted
¼ cup sliced kalamata (or other) olives
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.
Place the cauliflower florets in a large saute pan or a roasting pan. Drizzle the olive oil over the cauliflower, and season with the garlic, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Place the saute/roasting pan in the oven and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally to ensure even roasting. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with the cheese. Add the almonds and olives and toss until combined. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Roasted Cabbage & Cauliflower Salad With Peanut Dressing
1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets
1 head of cabbage,thinly sliced
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
1 (15oz) can chickpeas – or 2 cups of homemade beans, warmed
1/4 cup green onions or chives, sliced (optional)
Peanut Sauce
1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
2 Tbsp brown rice vinegar
1 clove garlic, chopped
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1/3 cup cup hot water
1. Preheat over to 400 degrees.
2. Place cauliflower and cabbage onto a baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Mix well and roast for 30 minutes or until cabbage and cauliflower are browned.
3. Meanwhile, mix together peanut sauce and set aside. You can add more water to thin the dressing if needed.
4. Once cauliflower and cabbage are done, let cool for a few minutes then mix cauliflower, cabbage and chickpeas together. Add more salt and pepper as needed.
5. Serve over grain of choice or greens and drizzle with peanut sauce. Garnish with green onion or chives if using.
ROMANESCO
What the Heck Is Romanesco and How Do You Cook It?
Lindsay Lowe, Parade.com
One of the more unusual vegetables we’ve come across, Romanesco appears to be part psychedelic broccoli, part alien life form.
In fact, it’s an edible flower from the family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage. It tastes very similar to cauliflower, but with a slightly nuttier, earthier flavor. You can use it as you would cauliflower in recipes, and it holds up to many different cooking methods.
“Romanesco can be served raw, lightly cooked, or cooked through,” said Mario Batali in a column for the Seattle Times last fall. “I usually sauté it slowly with garlic and lemon zest, and punctuate with red pepper flakes for zing.”
It’s also delicious steamed and lightly seasoned with olive oil and red wine vinegar.
Of course, the most fascinating part of Romanesco is its appearance. Its spiraled buds form a natural approximation of a fractal, meaning each bud in the spiral is composed of a series of smaller buds. (Remember the Fibonacci sequence from school? The spirals follow the same logarithmic pattern).
The Romanesco (sometimes called Romanesco Broccoli or Roman Cauliflower) did not always exist in nature. Many botanists believe it was the result of selective breeding by Italian farmers in the 16th century.
Romanesco is in season during from late summer to early fall, and it can often be found at local farmers’ markets, especially along the Eastern Seaboard. Just as when shopping for regular broccoli or cauliflower, look for firm, heavy heads free from discoloration or withered florets. To store in the fridge, keep in a tightly sealed bag.
ROASTED ROMANESCO
Ingredients
1 head Romanesco, cut into bite-size pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil, or more to taste
salt to taste
2 grinds fresh black pepper
1 pinch garlic powder
1 pinch paprika
Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
Spread Romanesco onto the prepared baking sheet; drizzle with olive oil and season with salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and paprika.
Roast in the preheated oven until tender, 15 to 20 minutes.
Tip
Aluminum foil helps keep food moist, ensures it cooks evenly, keeps leftovers fresh, and makes clean-up easy.
ANJALI’S ROMANESCO SALAD
Makes 2 servings as a main course or 4 to 6 as a side course
Romanesco is an Italian heirloom cauliflower with bright green,
fractal-like florets. It was previously found only at niche markets, but
thankfully, more farmers are growing Romanesco across the country.
If you cannot find Romanesco, any kind of cauliflower will do. When
steamed or boiled, Romanesco is silky tender and goes well with
crispy or salty embellishments and the richness of the eggs. If I had
them in the pantry, chopped anchovies would be excellent with these
flavors, as would a side of white beans fragrant with olive oil. Equally
delicious warm or cold, this can be a quick supper or lunch made a
day ahead.
–Walnuts can replace the pine nuts, and olive oil can substitute for the walnut
oil, which is sometimes difficult to find.
–To make fresh breadcrumbs, it’s preferable to use a loaf of bread that is at
least a day old. Slice off the crusts and cut the bread in to large pieces. Using
a food processor or blender, break the bread into large crumbs, taking care
to not overcrowd the processor, which could cause the bread to clump instead
of breaking down. Put the breadcrumbs on a baking sheet and toast in the oven
at 350 degrees for about 12 minutes until light golden brown.
1 large Romanesco, cut into approx.. 5 irregular pieces
3 large 10-minute eggs, peeled, halved, or quartered
¾ cup/30g coarse breadcrumbs, toasted
¼ cup/30g pine nuts,lightly toasted
1 cup/35g salt-packed capers, rinsed, chopped
2 Tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley
1/2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1 Tbsp walnut oil, plus more for garnish
1 Tbsp olive oil, plus more for garnish
1 Tbsp sherry vinegar,plus more for garnish
Sea salt
Ground black pepper
In a large pot fitted with a steamer basket and enough water to steam, add the Romanesco and steam until just tender, 4-6 minutes.
Arrange the cooked Romanesco and eggs on a serving platter.
Combine the breadcrumbs, pine nuts, capers, parsley, thyme, walnut oil, olive oil, and vinegar in a medium bowl, season with salt and pepper, and mix well. Scatter over the Romanesco and eggs. Drizzle a little more walnut oil, olive oil, and/or vinegar over the top and serve.

CAULIFLOWER; scroll down for specific Romanesco info—but Romanesco can be used in any cauliflower recipe.

I’ve seen several recipes that use cauliflower as “mock mashed potatoes”—cooking it until it loses its crunch and texture and then mashing it. I find it offensive to both the cauliflower and the potato—cauliflower has its own advantages, but it’s not a potato.

It’s not easy to face down a cauliflower. It usually doesn’t break apart as easily as a head of broccoli and needs a sharp knife to cut it into bite-sized pieces, The core and leaves have to be cut away and composted, though the stems are just as good as the flowers.

Cauliflower can be boiled or steamed to soften it—but my choice is raw, cooked lightly, or roasted.

Raw, it does well in a marinade, as below, or as a crudite with any dip or dunk. If you’re not a fan of very crunchy vegetables, cook it briefly before marinating, as in the salad below. There are also instructions for roasting below. Cauliflower is also great in a gratin, often mixed with broccoli. See general gratin instructions in Recipes from America’s Small Farms, p. 25. And there’s a more complicated Cauliflower Cheese Pie on p. 74.

CURRIED WINTER STEW WITH CAULIFLOWER AND WINTER SQUASH

This recipe appeared in the NYT (David Tanis) late last fall and it became one of my favorites instantly. It uses only one pan (plus whatever you cook the chickpeas in) and is a full meal, especially if you add rice and raita. I have not included the raita recipe because it was not especially great and took a lot of work—raita is easy, just add diced vegetables (radish is perfect, cucumber is good too) to yogurt. They suggest apple, which was just ok. Add curry powder, cayenne, diced hot pepper, or hot sauce. Mix the whole thing up, allow to sit in the refrigerator and bit and serve cold.

The first time I made this recipe, I followed it exactly, using the spice seeds and individual ground spices. I found the spice was too weak overall; now I just use pre-mixed curry powder. I start with a tablespoon and keep adding until it tastes right. I also add chopped greens to the stew, at the same time as the chickpeas—and sometimes string beans as well..

3 tablespoons untoasted sesame oil or vegetable oil

½ teaspoon cumin seeds

½ teaspoon coriander seeds

½ teaspoon turmeric

¼ teaspoon cayenne

1 2-inch piece of ginger, grated

6 small garlic cloves, minced

4 small hot red Asian chiles or Mexican chiles de árbol

1 large onion, diced, about 2 cups

Salt and pepper

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 cups delicata squash, unpeeled, in 1-inch slices, or butternut squash, peeled, in 1-inch cubes

1 cup parsnips, hard center core removed, in 1-inch slices or chunks

½ pound tiny potatoes, such as fingerlings, halved

2 cups small florets of cauliflower

1 cup cooked chickpeas, preferably home-cooked and the liquid reserved

Cilantro sprigs, for garnish

Steamed basmati rice (optional)

Apple raita (optional),

PREPARATION

1. Put oil in a wide, heavy pot over medium-high heat. When oil is wavy, add cumin seeds and coriander seeds and let sizzle for about 1 minute. Add turmeric, cayenne, ginger, garlic and chiles and stir to coat.

2. Add onion and season generously with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until softened and lightly colored, about 10 minutes. Add tomato paste and stir to coat. Add squash, parsnips and potatoes, salt lightly, then add 3 cups chickpea cooking liquid or water, or enough to just cover vegetables. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a brisk simmer. Cover and cook until vegetables are tender but firm, about 15 minutes.

3. Add cauliflower and chickpeas and stir gently to combine. Cover and continue cooking 5 to 8 minutes more, until cauliflower is tender. Taste broth and adjust seasoning, then transfer to a wide, deep serving platter or bowl. Garnish with cilantro sprigs. Serve with steamed basmati rice and apple raita, if desired.

MARINATED CAULIFLOWER SALAD

From Martha Stewart Living

1 large head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into small florets

1/4 cup white-wine vinegar

1/4 cup finely chopped red onion

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

2 tablespoons brine-packed capers, drained and rinsed

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Blanch cauliflower until just tender, about 2 minutes; work in batches if your pot is not big enough. Drain; transfer to a bowl.

Whisk together vinegar, onion, and mustard in a small bowl. Pour in oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over warm cauliflower, and add capers and parsley. Stir to combine.

Cover, and refrigerate overnight or up to 1 day. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Roasted Cauliflower with Almonds and Kalamata Olives

5-6 cups of cauliflower florets

2 tbs olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tbs lemon juice; and 1 tbs zest from an organic lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

¼ cup crumbled goat or feta cheese (if desired)

¼ cup blanched or slivered almonds, toasted

¼ cup sliced kalamata (or other) olives

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.

Place the cauliflower florets in a large saute pan or a roasting pan. Drizzle the olive oil over the cauliflower, and season with the garlic, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Place the saute/roasting pan in the oven and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally to ensure even roasting. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with the cheese. Add the almonds and olives and toss until combined. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Roasted Cabbage & Cauliflower Salad With Peanut Dressing

1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets

1 head of cabbage,thinly sliced

1/4 cup olive oil

1 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

1 (15oz) can chickpeas – or 2 cups of homemade beans, warmed

1/4 cup green onions or chives, sliced (optional)

Peanut Sauce

1/3 cup creamy peanut butter

2 Tbsp brown rice vinegar

1 clove garlic, chopped

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes

1/3 cup cup hot water

1. Preheat over to 400 degrees.

2. Place cauliflower and cabbage onto a baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Mix well and roast for 30 minutes or until cabbage and cauliflower are browned.

3. Meanwhile, mix together peanut sauce and set aside. You can add more water to thin the dressing if needed.

4. Once cauliflower and cabbage are done, let cool for a few minutes then mix cauliflower, cabbage and chickpeas together. Add more salt and pepper as needed.

5. Serve over grain of choice or greens and drizzle with peanut sauce. Garnish with green onion or chives if using.

ROMANESCO

What the Heck Is Romanesco and How Do You Cook It?

Lindsay Lowe, Parade.com

One of the more unusual vegetables we’ve come across, Romanesco appears to be part psychedelic broccoli, part alien life form.

In fact, it’s an edible flower from the family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage. It tastes very similar to cauliflower, but with a slightly nuttier, earthier flavor. You can use it as you would cauliflower in recipes, and it holds up to many different cooking methods.

“Romanesco can be served raw, lightly cooked, or cooked through,” said Mario Batali in a column for the Seattle Times last fall. “I usually sauté it slowly with garlic and lemon zest, and punctuate with red pepper flakes for zing.”

It’s also delicious steamed and lightly seasoned with olive oil and red wine vinegar.

Of course, the most fascinating part of Romanesco is its appearance. Its spiraled buds form a natural approximation of a fractal, meaning each bud in the spiral is composed of a series of smaller buds. (Remember the Fibonacci sequence from school? The spirals follow the same logarithmic pattern).

The Romanesco (sometimes called Romanesco Broccoli or Roman Cauliflower) did not always exist in nature. Many botanists believe it was the result of selective breeding by Italian farmers in the 16th century.

Romanesco is in season during from late summer to early fall, and it can often be found at local farmers’ markets, especially along the Eastern Seaboard. Just as when shopping for regular broccoli or cauliflower, look for firm, heavy heads free from discoloration or withered florets. To store in the fridge, keep in a tightly sealed bag.

ROASTED ROMANESCO

Ingredients

1 head Romanesco, cut into bite-size pieces

1 tablespoon olive oil, or more to taste

salt to taste

2 grinds fresh black pepper

1 pinch garlic powder

1 pinch paprika

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.

Spread Romanesco onto the prepared baking sheet; drizzle with olive oil and season with salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and paprika.

Roast in the preheated oven until tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

Tip

Aluminum foil helps keep food moist, ensures it cooks evenly, keeps leftovers fresh, and makes clean-up easy.

ANJALI’S ROMANESCO SALAD

Makes 2 servings as a main course or 4 to 6 as a side course

Romanesco is an Italian heirloom cauliflower with bright green,

fractal-like florets. It was previously found only at niche markets, but

thankfully, more farmers are growing Romanesco across the country.

If you cannot find Romanesco, any kind of cauliflower will do. When

steamed or boiled, Romanesco is silky tender and goes well with

crispy or salty embellishments and the richness of the eggs. If I had

them in the pantry, chopped anchovies would be excellent with these

flavors, as would a side of white beans fragrant with olive oil. Equally

delicious warm or cold, this can be a quick supper or lunch made a

day ahead.

–Walnuts can replace the pine nuts, and olive oil can substitute for the walnut

oil, which is sometimes difficult to find.

–To make fresh breadcrumbs, it’s preferable to use a loaf of bread that is at

least a day old. Slice off the crusts and cut the bread in to large pieces. Using

a food processor or blender, break the bread into large crumbs, taking care

to not overcrowd the processor, which could cause the bread to clump instead

of breaking down. Put the breadcrumbs on a baking sheet and toast in the oven

at 350 degrees for about 12 minutes until light golden brown.

1 large Romanesco, cut into approx.. 5 irregular pieces

3 large 10-minute eggs, peeled, halved, or quartered

¾ cup/30g coarse breadcrumbs, toasted

¼ cup/30g pine nuts,lightly toasted

1 cup/35g salt-packed capers, rinsed, chopped

2 Tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley

1/2 tsp fresh thyme leaves

1 Tbsp walnut oil, plus more for garnish

1 Tbsp olive oil, plus more for garnish

1 Tbsp sherry vinegar,plus more for garnish

Sea salt

Ground black pepper

In a large pot fitted with a steamer basket and enough water to steam, add the Romanesco and steam until just tender, 4-6 minutes.

Arrange the cooked Romanesco and eggs on a serving platter.

Combine the breadcrumbs, pine nuts, capers, parsley, thyme, walnut oil, olive oil, and vinegar in a medium bowl, season with salt and pepper, and mix well. Scatter over the Romanesco and eggs. Drizzle a little more walnut oil, olive oil, and/or vinegar over the top and serve.


 
Sep
05
    
Posted (Lori) in News

LUNCHBOX VEGGIES

Here are some strategies for getting our veggies into lunchboxes:

–Just plain: Many kids are happy to munch on raw stringbeans, carrots, pepper strips, kohlrabi slices, cauliflower and broccoli florets. If your child needs a little something more decorative, try cutting with a French fry cutter (for the carrots) or a a small cookie cutter (the pepper strips). Or find a cute box or printed ziplock bag for packing.

–All mixed up: Combine several veggies and fruit slices, plus something crunchy like almonds or sunflower seeds. If the pieces are small, serve with a spoon.

–Dip them: Raw veggies can accompany a small container of peanut butter, cheese, guacamole, or tahini dip. There’s probably at least one dip that your child likes and using veggies as spoons is fun.

–Kabobbing: String several vegetables on a skewer—but polish off the sharp tip before you pack it (those tips are really sharp!)

–Wrap them: Saute, roast or broil vegetables and mix with rice or another grain. Make bite-size wraps with tortillas or other flatbreads. Wrap them securely to avoid mess

–Leafy wraps: Kale or collard leaves can take the place of bread.

–Voodles: Use a spiralizer to create long strings of noodles; add your child’s favorite sauce.

Any other ideas to share? Send them and I’ll include next week

. Here are some sites from which I included ideas:

http://www.momskitchenhandbook.com/hidden/hot-tip-fresh-ideas-for-lunchbox-veggies/

http://www.coupons.com/thegoodstuff/21-vegetarian-lunch-ideas-for-kids/

http://www.coupons.com/thegoodstuff/21-vegetarian-lunch-ideas-for-kids/


 
Sep
04
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Week #14
Dear CSA Member,

The Farm Visit was a great turn out!  We had such beautiful weather and an all around good day!  We would like to thank all of our CSA members that made the trip to come visit farm yesterday.  And, special thanks to the vendors that joined us yesterday.  The Bees Knees Cafe at Heather Ridge Farm,  James Mikmanus and his niece with local honey and the observation hive,  Kim from Paridis to Go for making all the delicious pork and chili.  It was a really great day and we’re so thankful you could join us!  * If you have any pictures from the farm visit please share them with us info@stoneledge.farm we would love to use them on Facebook and our website.
This week in your share you will be getting potatoes, onions and collard greens.  Try this Rich and Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Collard Greens. This Recipe is by Andrea Beaman from the Yorkville CSA.  Thank you Andrea!  It is delicious!  You can replace the leeks with the current onions you have in your share.  It is great for this time of year!
Marketplace: Check Daily for Vegetable and Fruit Updates.
This week is an optional coffee & dry bean share week.  If you have ordered these optional shares please do not forget to pick them up with your vegetable share.  Thank You!
Best,
Candice for Everyone at Stoneledge Farm
What’s in the Bag Week #14

1 lb.- Green Beans
1 bunch- Dill
2 lbs.- Potaotes
2 – Red Onions
1 lb – Tomatillos
1 – White Eggplant
2- Sweet Bell Peppers
1 bunch- Collard Greens
2 – Serrano Peppers (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)
3- Sunkist Tomatoes
1- Red Slicing Tomato
Optional Shares this week
Mushroom Share
Portobellow
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Long John Plums
1 bag- Zestar Apples



Stoneledge Farm LLC
Mailing Address Only:
359 Ross Ruland Road
South Cairo, NY  12482


 
Aug
29
    
Posted (Lori) in News

NOTE FROM STONELEDGE

What’s in the Bag – Week #13

Dear CSA Member,

If you are traveling from NYC you might be interested in the bus that Chelsea CSA in sponsoring.  $5 per person, if you are interested click HERE and sign up ASAP.  Space is limited.

We hope that you will mark your calendar with the upcoming Fall Farm Festival.  The Fall Farm Festival will be held on the farm September 2nd from 11:30-3:00.  Please use the 145 Garcia Lane, Leeds, NY 12451 address. There are directions on the farm website Contact Us tab or using your GPS.  It is a great day to come to the farm and see how your vegetables are grown, meet your farmers and walk the fields.  We have the grill hot and will have pork as well as grilled Sweet Corn and Portobello Mushrooms and vegetarian chili.  Pork and Chili will be made by Kim and Mickael of Paradis to Go http://paradistogo.com.  There will be fresh fruit, Stoneledge Farm Coffee, and water.   We ask that members bring a dish to share so that lunch is a giant pot luck get together.  If possible, please bring your own place settings, utensils, and cup.   No pets, please.

Attending this years Farm Visit:

Local Bee Keeper- With an observation hive and Local Honey for Sale.

Heather Ridge Farm- Local grass fed meats for sale.

http://www.heather-ridge-farm.com/

Lime Kiln Farm will be attending with local artisanal cheeses.

http://www.limekilnfarm.com/#

*Please, bring a freezer bag if you are interested in purchasing any of these items.

Stoneledge Farm Marketplace Farm Stand-  Fix Brother Farm Apples, Some Stoneledge Farm Vegetables, Stoneledge Farm Coffee, Bearkill Road Maple Syrup, NY Produced Organic Seed Oils.

We hope that you will mark your calendar with the upcoming Fall Farm Festival.  The Fall Farm Festival will be held on the farm September 2nd from 11:30-3:00.  Please use the 145 Garcia Lane, Leeds, NY 12451 address. There are directions on the farm website Contact Us tab or using your GPS.  It is a great day to come to the farm and see how your vegetables are grown, meet your farmers and walk the fields.  We have the grill hot and will have pork as well as grilled Sweet Corn and Portobello Mushrooms and vegetarian chili.  Pork and Chili will be made by Kim and Mickael of Paradis to Go http://paradistogo.com.  There will be fresh fruit, Stoneledge Farm Coffee, and water.   We ask that members bring a dish to share so that lunch is a giant pot luck get together.  If possible, please bring your own place settings, utensils, and cup.   No pets, please.

Attending this years Farm Visit:

Local Bee Keeper- With an observation hive and Local Honey for Sale.

Heather Ridge Farm- Local grass fed meats for sale.

http://www.heather-ridge-farm.com/

Lime Kiln Farm will be attending with local artisanal cheeses.

http://www.limekilnfarm.com/#

*Please, bring a freezer bag if you are interested in purchasing any of these items.

Stoneledge Farm Marketplace Farm Stand-  Fix Brother Farm Apples, Some Stoneledge Farm Vegetables, Stoneledge Farm Coffee, Bearkill Road Maple Syrup, NY Produced Organic Seed Oils.

There are flowers to pick and take home from the flower garden.  If you would like to take flowers home, please bring your own scissors and something that will keep the flowers fresh until you get home.  Wet paper towels or newspapers in a plastic bag will usually do the trick.  There will be an “I Spy” game for kids of all ages as well as scarecrow making!

It is a great day on the farm and we look forward to seeing you there!

Enjoy the Harvest,

Candice for Everyone at Stoneledge Farm

What’s in the Bag?

2 Sunkist Tomatoes

2 Hot Peppers (EXTREMELY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)

2 Sweet Bell Peppers

1 White Bell Eggplant

1 bunch Swiss Chard

1 bunch Edamame Beans

1 bunch Gold Beets (Use the Greens!)

2 Red Onions

1 bunch Cilantro

2 Red Slicing Tomatoes

Optional Shares this week

Mushroom Share

Jumbo Shiitake

Fruit Share:

1 bag White Donut Peaches

1 bag Green Clapp Pears

Stoneledge Farm LLC

info@stoneledge.farm

www.stoneledge.farm

Mailing Address Only:

359 Ross Ruland Road

South Cairo, NY  12482

LIKE us at https://www.facebook.com/StoneledgeFarm