Sep
26
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BROCCOLI: BASICS AND QUICKIES

For each of these: Cut off the rough ends of the stems. If you’re fussy or if the broccoli is old, use a vegetable peeler to peel off the top layer of the stems. Cut the florets and stems into bite sized pieces. Cook by:

–Dropping into a pot of boiling water for about 2 minutes

–Microwaving (in a microwave-safe dish, with just a few drops of water) for about 2 minutes

–Steaming in a steamer basket over boiling water two to four minutes

–Sauteeing in oil or butter for about 3 minutes

BROCCOLI WITH GINGER, BUTTER, AND NUTS: Melt about 2 tablespoons of butter for 2 cups of broccoli. Mince the ginger finely or grate it so that you have about 2 tsps; add it to the melted butter. Toss all the ingredients together; salt and pepper to taste.

BROCCOLI WITH SHALLOTS AND BLEU CHEESE: Mix ¼ cup sour cream, 1 tablespoon mayonnaise, a squirt of lemon juice, and salt and pepper; add about 1 tbs of crumbled bleu cheese. If you can, leave for several hours before serving. Add to broccoli, with 1 tbs. minced shallot.

BROCCOLI WITH CHILI OIL

1/2 medium jalapeño with most of the seeds and veins removed, minced

1 shallot, minced

1/4 cup peanut, corn, or blended vegetable oil (see Notes)

1 1/2 tablespoons water

1/4 teaspoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

Pinch white pepper

Heat the jalapeno, shallot, and oil in a small saucepan over medium heat for several minutes. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes for flavors to meld. While the oil is still warm, stir in water, sugar, salt, and pepper. When ready to serve, spoon the flavored oil over the broccoli and toss gently.

BROCCOLI GRATIN:

Melt 3 tbs butter in a skiller. Add 3 tablespoons flour, stir until full combined. Add 2 cups milk (heat to almost boiling in a microwave first, if you have a microwave). Stir constantly over very low heat until it thickens (this is a basic white/béchamel sauce). Add salt and pepper to taste, and a grating of nutmeg if you like nutmeg. In small baking dish, combine the white sauce with the broccoli; add cheese if you want (cheddar, mozzarella, parmesan, feta, goat—really, anything goes). Sprinkle bread crumbs on top and bake for 15-20 minutes, until the crumbs are golden and the the sauce is bubbly.

BEST BROCCOLI RECIPE EVER

Someone from the internet claims to have the best broccoli recipe ever. I don’t see what’s so special, but he seems so confident that I’m including it.

http://www.amateurgourmet.com/2008/11/the_best_brocco.html

RAW BROCCOLI BY ANOTHER NAME

BROCCOLI SALAD WITH GARLIC AND SESAME

Longtime member Marc sent this recipe, which appeared in the NYT in 2008; he wrote, “This is my go to broccoli recipe. Super easy and delicious.”

By MELISSA CLARK

YIELD6 to 8 side-dish servings or more as an hors d’oeuvre

This salad is made from uncooked broccoli tossed with an assertive garlic, sesame, chile and cumin-seed vinaigrette slicked with good extra-virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. The acid “cooks” the florets a little as ceviche does fish. After an hour, the broccoli softens as if blanched, turning bright emerald, and soaking up all the intense flavors of the dressing. You’ll be making this one again.

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ teaspoons red wine vinegar

1 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste

2 heads broccoli, 1 pound each, cut into bite-size florets

¾ cup extra virgin olive oil

4 fat garlic cloves, minced

2 teaspoons cumin seeds

2 teaspoons roasted (Asian) sesame oil

Large pinch crushed red pepper flakes.

PREPARATION

In a large bowl, stir together the vinegar and salt. Add broccoli and toss to combine.

In a large skillet, heat olive oil until hot, but not smoking. Add garlic and cumin and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in sesame oil and pepper flakes. Pour mixture over broccoli and toss well. Let sit for at least 1 hour at room temperature, and up to 48 (chill it if you want to keep it for more than 2 hours). Adjust seasonings (it may need more salt) and serve.

ROASTED BROCCOLI WITH ALMONDS AND CARDAMOM (MALAI BROCCOLI)

From this week’s NYT

This recipe comes from the British cookbook author Meera Sodha, who adapted it from a dish she tasted in Goa, India. It’s a smart, simple technique that turns the broccoli crisp and creamy at the same time: charred florets with a lick of thick nutmeg-spiced sauce baked into every nook and cranny. Ms. Sodha uses a mix of cream cheese, yogurt and ground almonds. Don’t be afraid to get messy and use your hands to thoroughly coat the broccoli in the sauce; it pays off later.

Featured in: For Everyday Vegetable Dishes, Meera Sodha Is The Master.

1 ? pounds broccoli florets (from 2 to 3 heads of broccoli)

8 ounces cream cheese, softened

4 tablespoons Greek yogurt

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

½ teaspoon ground cardamom

¼ teaspoon ground or freshly grated whole nutmeg

¾ cup ground almonds

3 tablespoons lemon juice

PREPARATION

Heat the oven to 400 degrees and line 2 large baking trays with parchment paper. Break the broccoli into bite-size pieces. Place all the other ingredients into a large bowl and mix well, using a spatula, spoon or electric mixer to combine. Add the broccoli and mix using clean hands, making sure the mixture gets into all the nooks and crannies of the florets.Divide the broccoli between the 2 baking sheets and roast for 10 minutes. Turn the pieces over and return to the oven for another 10 minutes, or until the broccoli is tender, crunchy and charred in places. Pile into a bowl and serve.

Broccoli Rubble Farro Salad

From: The Smitten Kitchen

SERVINGS: 2 ROBUST SERVINGS OR 4 MORE PETITE ONES TIME: 45 MINUTES

I like grain salads that are as much vegetable as they are grain, if not more so. If that’s not your thing, double the farro here.

I like to peel the broccoli stems so that they cook as quickly as the florets.

I boil the broccoli here for ease — so you don’t have to turn on the oven and use the stove — but you can definitely approach the broccoli prep as we did here and then give it a chop.

This is the easiest way to make farro — boiling and draining — second only to a rice-cooker. If mine hadn’t been broken at the hands of a small, possibly well-intended child, I’d have used it.

Salt

1 cup semi-pearled faro

1 pound broccolini or regular broccoli (previously: 2 pounds, see note

4 tablespoons olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

Red pepper flakes, to taste

Finely grated zest, then juice, of 1 lemon (juice before zesting only if you enjoy being grumpy)

Freshly ground black pepper

4 ounces pecorino romano, grated or ground in a food processor

Bring a medium/large pot of salted water to boil. Once boiling, add broccoli and boil for 2 to 2 1/2 minutes, until slightly softened but still crisp overall. Scoop out with slotted spoon or tongs, then drain.

Add farro back to same pot (I’m totally okay with some errant leftover broccoli flecks and vitamins here, if you’re not, use another pot of salted water) and cook, simmering, for 25 to 30 minutes, until tender. (Since there are so many varieties of farro, however, if your package suggests otherwise, it’s best to defer to its cooking suggestion.) Drain and tip into a large mixing bowl; cool to lukewarm.

Pat drained broccoli dry on towels, trying to remove as much excess moisture as possible. Chop into small (roughly 1/2-inch) bits. In a large sauté pan, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until hot. Add garlic and pepper flakes, to taste, and cook for 1 minute, until garlic is faintly golden. Add chopped broccoli, lemon zest, and salt (I use a full teaspoon kosher salt here, but adjust the amount to your taste) and cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 more minutes, until broccoli is well-seasoned and slightly more tender.

Add broccoli and every bit of garlic and oil from the pan to the bowl of farro and stir to combine. Add lemon juice, black pepper and more salt to taste (but 1/2 teaspoon of each is what we used) and stir to combine. Stir in cheese.

Serve warm or at room temperature as-in, with an egg on top, burrata, and/or seasoned breadcrumbs.

JANE AND MICHAEL STERN’S BROCCOLI CASSEROLE

“From Lyn Rosetto Kasper and Sally Swift’s book, “The Splendid Table: How to Eat Supper”

READY IN: 50mins    SERVES: 4-6

YIELD: 1 casserole    UNITS: US

INGREDIENTS

5 -6 slices white bread, soft, torn into bite-sized pieces

3 large eggs

1?4 cup milk

4 tablespoons butter, melted

1 cup cheddar cheese, grated

1 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons sugar

1 1?2-2 cups broccoli, florets only, chopped fine (1 small bunch)

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter an 8-inch square Pyrex baking dish. Cover the bottom of the dish generously with the torn bread.

Combine the eggs, milk, melted butter, cheese, salt and sugar in a bowl. Mix until combined. Stir in the roccoli and pour the mixture over the read.

Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 35 minutes. For a chewier top, remove the foil during the last 10 to 12 minutes of baking. If you want a crisper crust, run the casserole under the broiler.


 
Sep
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Below is your update for tomorrow along with a couple notes.
Due to the rainy spring we have had the butternut squash will not hold as long as usual.  Please use as soon as possible.
Fruit Share Members – This week you will be getting prune plums.  They are a cooking plum and are tart to eat fresh.  Below are a few links with recipes on how to use the cooking plums this week.  Enjoy!
Plum Torte - Click Here
Plum Conserve - Click Here (Great to spread on toast)
Best,
Candice
Butternut Winter Squash- 1
1 bunch- Spinach
1 bunch- Leeks
1 Lb.- Purple Carrots
1 bunch- Mint
2 lbs.- White Potatoes
1- Celeriac
2-Ancho Peppers (Mild Hot Pepper)
1 head- Romanesco Cauliflower
Optional Shares this week
Mushroom Share: Grown by Bulich Mushroom Farm
Oyster
Fruit Share: Grown by Fix Brother and Klein Kill Orchard
1 bag- Prune Plums
1 bag- Fuji Apples
Stoneledge Farm LLC

 
Sep
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BUTTERNUT SQUASH BASICS

I prepare butternut squash in two ways. The easiest is to prick it in a few places and microwave it for about five minutes until it is soft enough to cut (if you have better knives than I do, you can probably skip this step). Then I cut it in half, add some butter or oil and a bit of brown sugar, honey, or maple syrup. I put it on a baking sheet and roast at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until it’s soft and mushy. The other way takes much longer to prepare: Peel it, cut into cubes, and roast or boil until soft.

Onces it’s cooked, winter squash can be used in many recipes. Our members sent a slew of them last year, which I’m reposting

DOM’S SQUASH SOUP IN COCONUT MILK

(a Filipino dish)

2-3 pounds butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes.

1 small piece ginger, chopped finely

3-4 cups chicken broth Just enough chicken broth to cover the squash pieces (since I use the whole squash, this volume can vary).

1 tbsp vegetable oil

2 cloves garlic, crushed and minced

1 small onion, chopped finely

1 boneless chicken breast, boiled and shredded

1/4 pound shrimp, shelled and deveined

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 13.5-ounce can coconut milk

–In a pot, mix half of the squash pieces, ginger and enough chicken broth to cover the squash.

–Bring to a boil, then simmer with the lid on, over low to medium heat until squash is tender for about 10-15 minutes.

–Mash the squash with a ladle or fork. This will be the “mashed” portion of the soup that also makes the soup thicker.

–Add the rest of the squash pieces, add more chicken broth if necessary and simmer for 5-10 min, until soft. This will be the chunky squash pieces.

While the squash is softening, heat vegetable oil in another pan. Add garlic and fry until lightly browned.

–Add onions and stir fry until fragrant and soft.

–Add shrimp and stir fry until just cooked.

–Add chicken and stir fry until well-combined.

–Mix the stir-fried components into the pot of softened squash.

–Add coconut milk and simmer for 5 min. Just add enough coconut milk to make the soup creamy and not dilute the soup. Usually, I use the whole can.

–Add fish sauce, salt and pepper to taste.

Recipe modified from: http://blog.junbelen.com/2013/12/11/how-to-make-ginataang-kalabasa-at-sitaw-butternut-squash-and-yard-long-beans-in-coconut

DREAMY ROASTED BUTTER SQUASH AND CARROT SOUP

FROM ANJALI: My husband and kids claimed this to be the best soup they have ever had! So thought I would share

Ingredients

1 butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1 lb carrots, cut into 1/2 inch circles

2 medium potatoes, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

2 tbs olive oil

1 large onion, cut into small dice

3 stalks celery cut into small pieces

3 cups vegetable stock

1 1/2 inch piece ginger cut into coins

5-7 sprigs thyme

2 tbs olive oil

Roasted sunflower seeds

1. Preheat oven to 400f.

2. Mix squash, carrots and potatoes with 2 tablespoons oil, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste

3. Roast in oven for 30-40 mins until soft and starting to brown

4. Meanwhile heat another 2 tablespoons oil in a medium sized saucepan

5. Sauté onion for a few mins.

6. Then add celery and sauté for a few more mins

7. Add stock, ginger and thyme and bring to a boil. Simmer for 10 mins.

8. Add veggies to onion/celery/stock mixture when roasted

9. Remove thyme sprigs.

10. Purée in blender and add water as necessary.

11. Add roasted sunflower seeds as a garnish

FROM MICHELLE:

ROASTED BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND RED ONION WITH TAHINI AND ZA’ATAR

Adapted from Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi

Michelle writes, “While the vegetables undergo their transformation, you make a lemon-and-garlic spiked tahini sauce and cook some pine nuts in olive oil and salt until they get golden-brown. And then you layer everything together and serve it in one show-stopping stunner of a dish. The colors alone make you do a double-take. And then when you finally taste it, you’re done for.

If you think you might show more restraint, just talk to my husband who accidentally ate three quarters of it and forgot to ask if I wanted more. For the record, I would’ve done the same thing – it’s just that he got to it first.

I don’t normally insist on certain cookbooks beings a must-own in your library, but I really think you can’t go wrong with this book. The recipes are fantastic and straightforward, and while you might have to get a few “exotic” ingredients like tahini, za’atar, or date syrup, it’s well worth the investment. These ingredients will enable you to flavor your food differently, expand your palate, and make you a better cook. If you don’t have a Middle Eastern shop near you (I am, at the moment, very lucky in that department), there’s always Kalustyan’s which has all three of the above ingredients, and then some.

1 medium butternut squash (about 624 grams; 22 ounces) peeled and cut into 1×2 1/2 inch pieces

1 large red onion, cut into eighths

3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon olive oil, divided

1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt, divided plus additional to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

3 tablespoons tahini paste

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 small garlic clove, pounded into a paste

3 tablespoons (30 grams; about 1.2 ounces) pine nuts

1 tablespoon za’atar

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Flaky sea salt

1. Heat the oven to 475 degrees F with the rack positioned in the middle.

2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the squash and onion and 3 tablespoons of the olive oil, 1 teaspoon fine sea salt, and a few twists of the pepper grinder. Toss until the ingredients are combined. Spread the vegetables on a shallow baking sheet, leaving them enough “breathing” room and roast in the oven 25 to 35 minutes, or until the vegetables have taken on some color and are cooked through. You’ll want to see a little bit of charring, though not too much. Keep an eye out on the onion; you may need to pick it out earlier. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool.

3. While the vegetables are roasting, make the sauce. Place the tahini I a small bowl along with 2 tablespoons of water, lemon juice, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt. Whisk until the sauce is the consistency of honey. You might need to add more water or tahini, depending.

4. Pour the remaining 1 teaspoon of oil into a small skillet and place over medium-low heat. Add the pine nuts along with 1/2 teaspoon of fine sea salt, and cook, stirring often until the nuts are golden brown, about 2 minutes. Remove fro the heat and transfer both: the nuts and the oil to a small bowl (otherwise the nuts will continue to cook).

5. To serve, spread the vegetables out on a large plate or a serving platter, and drizzle over the tahini. Sprinkle the pine nuts and their oil on top, followed by za’atar and the parsley. Add a few flakes of the flaky sea salt and serve.

Serves 2 to 4.

Michelle’s BUTTERNUT SQUASH MAC AND CHEESE

Serves 4

This is just pure old-fashioned comfort food. You are able to enjoy the warm creaminess you look for, with all the goodness of wholesome foods.

Equipment: Food processor

Ingredients:

16 oz. elbow pasta; or use your favorite shape or a brown rice gluten-free otion.

Butternut squash cream:

2 cups peeled and cubed butternut squash, broiled until tender

½ cup cashews, soaked for one hour

¼ cup nutritional yeast

1 tablespoon sea salt

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

1 clove garlic

¼ cup filtered water

Walnut bread crumbs

¼ cup walnuts

2 tablespoons nutritional yeast

1 tablespoon sea salt

Pulse bread crumb ingredients until finely ground and set aside.  Boil pasta; drain, rinse, toss with small amount of olive oil to prevent sticking and then set aside.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Drain and rinse cashews and transfer to a food processor with remaining cream ingredients. Blend until smooth and creamy. Add to pasta, mix well and transfer to a lightly oiled 8×8 baking dish. Top with walnut bread crumbs and bake for 25 minutes.

BLACK BEAN AND BUTTERNUT SQUASH BURRITOS

FROM: http://ohsheglows.com/2011/10/24/black-bean-and-butternut-squash-burritos/

The best burritos I’ve ever made. Also, the only burritos I’ve ever made. But quite possibly the best I’ve tasted! These burritos have a kick of heat to them (that you can control yourself) and a light sweetness thanks to the butternut squash. The filling is so good I found myself eating it on its own. Use it to sprinkle on salads or as a dip for crackers in addition to making burritos. You could also try using sweet potato or pumpkin as a way to change up the butternut filling.

Yield

4 burritos or 3.5 cups of filling        Prep Time

25 Minutes    Cook time

50 Minutes

Ingredients:

1 medium butternut squash, peeled, cubed, & roasted

1/2 cup uncooked short grain brown rice (yields: 1.5 cups cooked)

1-2 tsp olive oil

1 cup chopped sweet onion

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 red pepper, chopped

1 tsp kosher salt, or to taste

2 tsp ground cumin, or to taste

1/4 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste

One 15-oz can black beans (about 1.5-2 cups cooked), drained and rinsed

3/4 cup Daiya cheese

4 tortilla wraps (large or x-large)

Toppings (Optional):

avocado

salsa

vegan sour cream

spinach/lettuce

cilantro

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425°F and line a large glass dish with tinfoil. Drizzle olive oil on squash and give a shake of salt and pepper. Coat with hands. Roast chopped butternut squash for 45 mins. or until tender.

Cook brown rice (for directions, see here)

In a large skillet over medium-low heat, add oil, onion, and minced garlic. Sautee for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Now add in salt and seasonings and stir well.

Add chopped red pepper, black beans, and cooked rice and sauté for another 10 mins. on low.

When butternut squash is tender remove from oven and cool slightly. Add 1.5 cups of the cooked butternut squash to the skillet and stir well. You can mash the squash with a fork if some pieces are too large. Add Daiya cheese and heat another couple minutes.

Add bean filling to tortilla along with desired toppings. Wrap and serve. Leftover filling can be reheated the next day for lunch in a wrap or as a salad topper.


 
Sep
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News
ROSH HASHANAH
Shana Tova—Happy New Year 5778
Only a fraction of our members celebrate the Jewish New Year; but I think the recipes are useful—and I for one like to hear about other people’s traditions. If anyone has recipes from other cultures, please send them. Our CSA is very diverse—I counted native-born representatives of 28 nations and that doesn’t count parents and grandparents’ nationalities—and it would be nice to share.
Rosh Hashanah, for most, means sweet food. Symbolism is big in Judaism and sweet foods symbolize the desire for a sweet year. But it doesn’t stop with sweetness. The Talmud, in a rare show of humor, established a series of puns involving food and suggested including them in Rosh Hashanah meals. For example—the word for “carrots” in Yiddish is mirren, which sound like the word for “increase.” So when you eat a dish with carrots, you say: “May it be the will of god that our fortunes will increase in the New Year.” The wordplay involves beets (let’s beat our enemies), leeks (the yiddish word sounds like cut—lets cut off the efforts of those who try to harm us), cabbage, carrots, apples, gourds/squash, dates, and fish heads, but there’s no reason not to create your own based on English rather than Hebrew or Yiddish words. (My brother makes raisin-celery salad to promote a raise in his salary.) Here’s a recipe for leek pancakes and one for sweet peppers. And a recipe for stuffed cabbage (may the new year be stuffed with joy). And some kugels—because everyone needs a kugel, especially on Rosh Hashana, and we have a lot of potatoes.
CHALLAH
I found a video on how to braid challah; I tried it and made some great-looking challot:
http://www.cookistry.com/2014/10/bread-shaping-technique-amazing-video.html
Here’s a link for challah dough, but I’ve never been good at it. If someone has a foolproof challah dough recipr, please share:
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/classic-challah-recipeXX
CHICKPEA & LEEK PANCAKES
3/4 cup cooked chickpeas (cooked dry peas are better, but you can use canned beans)
1 large leek
1 egg
Bunch of cilantro or parsley
Salt and pepper
Optional: You can add a tablespoon of flour if you prefer more of a ‘pancakey’ texture, I prefer them sans flour.
Chop the chickpeas, leek and cilantro
Combine all three into a bowl and stir in one whisked egg
Add salt + pepper (and the flour if you wish)
Add a small drizzle of your preferred oil to a fry pan and spoon tablespoon amounts into the pan (this recipe will make 5 or 6 fritters)
Cook each side until golden and serve with a squeeze of lemon or lime or even a bit of Greek yoghurt
ROASTED PEPPERS WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS
2-3 peppers (any color) quartered or cut into lay-flat slices
2 tbs olive oil
2 garlic cloves, sliced
1 ounce slivered almonds
2 tbs honey
2 tbs sherry wine vinegar
2 tbs fresh parsley, chopped
Preheat broiler to high.
Place peppers skin side up in a single layer and broil for 5-10 minutes till charred. Remove to a paper bag to steam and cool. When cool enough remove skin and discard.  Slice into bite size pieces.
In a large pan, heat oil and add garlic for about 3 minutes add almond for 1 minute add honey and vinegar mixing in, Pour over peppers and garnish with parsley season with salt and pepper. Serve room temperature.
HALUPKIS: STUFFED CABBAGE
This is enough for about 12-16 servings, but the recipe can easily be halved.
2 large cabbage heads, coarse outer leaves removed
2 cups rice, uncooked
2 medium onions, diced
3 pounds ground lean beef
1/2 teaspoon black pepper, ground
2 teaspoons salt
4 eggs, beaten
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1 (14.5 ounce) can tomato sauce (or fresh tomato sauce)
1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth (or fresh chicken soup)
1 cup chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned
1 chopped hot pepper—remove seeds to adjust heat
Remove the center core of each head of cabbage. Place in large pot of boiling water. Boil until soft, removing each leaf as it softens. Let leaves cool, then trim the thick rib on each leaf. Reserve 14.5 ounces of the cabbage cooking water.
Boil rice in a separate saucepot until half cooked. Drain and set aside.
In a bowl combine beef, partially cooked rice, pepper, salt, eggs, cooked onion-bacon mixture, paprika, and celery salt. Measure the mixture with medium sized ice-cream scoop to make each halupki the same size.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
On each separate cabbage leaf, place 1 scoop of the meat mixture at the bottom of the leaf and roll, tightly tucking the sides to cover the mixture. Line the bottom of a roasting pan (not aluminum) with cabbage leaves that are too dark or to small to use for rolling. Place halupkis in roasting pan, making 2 layers.
Combine tomato sauce, broth, chopped tomatoes, and reserved cooking liquid and pour over halupki. Cover and bake for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more liquid, if needed.
They taste best the next day.
ROASTED SWEET POTATO SLICES WITH CILANTRO PESTO
Serves 6; makes 2 cups pesto
For the sweet potatoes:
2 pounds sweet potatoes (winter squash can be substituted)
1 tablespoon olive oil
Chunky kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
For the pesto:
2 bunches cilantro
3/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
3/4 cup shelled pistachios
4 cloves garlic
1 hot pepper, such as jalapeño or Thai, optional
1 lemon, juiced
1/4 cup vegetable or olive oil
Salt to taste
Heat the oven to 450°F. Slice the sweet potatoes in rounds about 1/2-inch thick. Spread in a single layer on a baking sheet and brush with the olive oil. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, or until tender and slightly browned.
While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the pesto. Roughly chop the cilantro and blend both leaves and stems with the coconut, pistachios, garlic, hot pepper (if using), and lemon juice. Add 2 tablespoons of oil and blend until smooth. Add the rest, if desired. Taste and add salt (or more garlic, or more acid) until satisfied. If desired, thin the pesto with water to make it spreadable.
When sweet potatoes are cooked through, spread on a platter and top with pesto. Serve immediately.
BUTTERNUT SQUASH, PECANS AND CURRANTS
1 small butternut squash (about 1 pounds)
3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 thyme sprigs
Salt
Pepper
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans
1.5 teaspoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar
¼ cup currants
½ teaspoon chili flakes
Heat oven to 450 degrees. Cut the squash in two at the base of the neck, discarding the hollow bulb end or reserving for another use. Peel the rest and slice into 1/2-inch disks. Toss the squash in a large roasting pan with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, thyme and salt and pepper to taste, and arrange in a single layer. Roast the squash, turning once halfway through, until tender and beginning to brown, about 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a large skillet over medium heat, combine garlic and one tablespoon of the remaining olive oil. Sauté until fragrant and tender, about one minute. Add pecans and sugar, and toss until the sugar has melted and the pecans are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Whisk the vinegar into the remaining olive oil. Add the pecan mixture, currants and chili flakes. Mix well, and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Arrange the squash on a warm platter and top with some or all of the dressing.
TUNISIAN CARROT SALAD WITH CUMIN, CORIANDER AND CARAWAY
2 pounds carrots, peeled
1 teaspoon salt, or as needed
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground caraway
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon harissa or other hot sauce
Fresh lemon juice, as needed, optional
Bring a pot of water to a boil, and add carrots and 1 teaspoon salt. Boil until almost tender, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, set aside a bowl of ice water. Transfer cooked carrots to the ice bath and chill.
Drain carrots, and cut into disks about 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to a bowl and add olive oil. Sprinkle with cumin, caraway, and coriander. Add harissa or hot sauce, and mix gently. Season with lemon juice and salt to taste. Serve at room temperature.
POTATO KUGEL AND VARIATIONS
3 eggs
1 small onion, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
½ teaspoon salt, more or less to taste (I use much more)
1/8 teaspoon pepper, more or less to taste
1 tablespoon bread crumbs or matzo meal
4 large potatos, peeled and cut into chunks (about 2 pounds)
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Put everything except the potatoes and 1 tablespoon oil in a food processor and whirl for about a minute, until smooth. Add the potatoes and pulse until chopped fine, but not smooth; don’t overprocess, you just want to avoid large chunks.
Put the last tablespoon of oil into a baking dish, about 8 inches square or round. Pour the potato mixture into the baking dish. Bake until brown crust forms on top, about 40 minutes. Allow to cool slightly before serving.
VARIATIONS: Replace up to half the potatoes with other vegetables—broccoli, summer or winter squash, carrots, stringbeans, yams, cauliflower. I find that if at least half of the vegetables are not potatoes, the texture isn’t good.

Shana Tova—Happy New Year 5778

Only a fraction of our members celebrate the Jewish New Year; but I think the recipes are useful—and I for one like to hear about other people’s traditions. If anyone has recipes from other cultures, please send them. Our CSA is very diverse—I count native-born representatives of 28 nations and that doesn’t count parents and grandparents’ nationalities—and it would be nice to share.

Rosh Hashanah, for most, means sweet food. Symbolism is big in Judaism and sweet foods symbolize the desire for a sweet year. But it doesn’t stop with sweetness. The Talmud, in a rare show of humor, established a series of puns involving food and suggested including them in Rosh Hashanah meals. For example—the word for “carrots” in Yiddish is mirren, which sound like the word for “increase.” So when you eat a dish with carrots, you say: “May it be the will of god that our fortunes will increase in the New Year.” The wordplay involves beets (let’s beat our enemies), leeks (the yiddish word sounds like cut—lets cut off the efforts of those who try to harm us), cabbage, carrots, apples, gourds/squash, dates, and fish heads, but there’s no reason not to create your own based on English rather than Hebrew or Yiddish words. (My brother makes raisin-celery salad to promote a raise in his salary.) Here’s a recipe for leek pancakes and one for sweet peppers. And a recipe for stuffed cabbage (may the new year be stuffed with joy). And some kugels—because everyone needs a kugel, especially on Rosh Hashana, and we have a lot of potatoes.

CHALLAH

I found a video on how to braid challah; I tried it and made some great-looking challot:

http://www.cookistry.com/2014/10/bread-shaping-technique-amazing-video.html

Here’s a link for challah dough, but I’ve never been good at it. If someone has a foolproof challah dough recipr, please share:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/classic-challah-recipeXX

CHICKPEA & LEEK PANCAKES

3/4 cup cooked chickpeas (cooked dry peas are better, but you can use canned beans)

1 large leek

1 egg

Bunch of cilantro or parsley

Salt and pepper

Optional: You can add a tablespoon of flour if you prefer more of a ‘pancakey’ texture, I prefer them sans flour.

Chop the chickpeas, leek and cilantro

Combine all three into a bowl and stir in one whisked egg

Add salt + pepper (and the flour if you wish)

Add a small drizzle of your preferred oil to a fry pan and spoon tablespoon amounts into the pan (this recipe will make 5 or 6 fritters)

Cook each side until golden and serve with a squeeze of lemon or lime or even a bit of Greek yoghurt

ROASTED PEPPERS WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS

2-3 peppers (any color) quartered or cut into lay-flat slices

2 tbs olive oil

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1 ounce slivered almonds

2 tbs honey

2 tbs sherry wine vinegar

2 tbs fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat broiler to high.

Place peppers skin side up in a single layer and broil for 5-10 minutes till charred. Remove to a paper bag to steam and cool. When cool enough remove skin and discard.  Slice into bite size pieces.

In a large pan, heat oil and add garlic for about 3 minutes add almond for 1 minute add honey and vinegar mixing in, Pour over peppers and garnish with parsley season with salt and pepper. Serve room temperature.

HALUPKIS: STUFFED CABBAGE

This is enough for about 12-16 servings, but the recipe can easily be halved.

2 large cabbage heads, coarse outer leaves removed

2 cups rice, uncooked

2 medium onions, diced

3 pounds ground lean beef

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, ground

2 teaspoons salt

4 eggs, beaten

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

1 (14.5 ounce) can tomato sauce (or fresh tomato sauce)

1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth (or fresh chicken soup)

1 cup chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned

1 chopped hot pepper—remove seeds to adjust heat

Remove the center core of each head of cabbage. Place in large pot of boiling water. Boil until soft, removing each leaf as it softens. Let leaves cool, then trim the thick rib on each leaf. Reserve 14.5 ounces of the cabbage cooking water.

Boil rice in a separate saucepot until half cooked. Drain and set aside.

In a bowl combine beef, partially cooked rice, pepper, salt, eggs, cooked onion-bacon mixture, paprika, and celery salt. Measure the mixture with medium sized ice-cream scoop to make each halupki the same size.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

On each separate cabbage leaf, place 1 scoop of the meat mixture at the bottom of the leaf and roll, tightly tucking the sides to cover the mixture. Line the bottom of a roasting pan (not aluminum) with cabbage leaves that are too dark or to small to use for rolling. Place halupkis in roasting pan, making 2 layers.

Combine tomato sauce, broth, chopped tomatoes, and reserved cooking liquid and pour over halupki. Cover and bake for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more liquid, if needed.

They taste best the next day.

ROASTED SWEET POTATO SLICES WITH CILANTRO PESTO

Serves 6; makes 2 cups pesto

For the sweet potatoes:

2 pounds sweet potatoes (winter squash can be substituted)

1 tablespoon olive oil

Chunky kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the pesto:

2 bunches cilantro

3/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

3/4 cup shelled pistachios

4 cloves garlic

1 hot pepper, such as jalapeño or Thai, optional

1 lemon, juiced

1/4 cup vegetable or olive oil

Salt to taste

Heat the oven to 450°F. Slice the sweet potatoes in rounds about 1/2-inch thick. Spread in a single layer on a baking sheet and brush with the olive oil. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, or until tender and slightly browned.

While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the pesto. Roughly chop the cilantro and blend both leaves and stems with the coconut, pistachios, garlic, hot pepper (if using), and lemon juice. Add 2 tablespoons of oil and blend until smooth. Add the rest, if desired. Taste and add salt (or more garlic, or more acid) until satisfied. If desired, thin the pesto with water to make it spreadable.

When sweet potatoes are cooked through, spread on a platter and top with pesto. Serve immediately.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH, PECANS AND CURRANTS

1 small butternut squash (about 1 pounds)

3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

3 thyme sprigs

Salt

Pepper

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans

1.5 teaspoons brown sugar

2 tablespoons Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar

¼ cup currants

½ teaspoon chili flakes

Heat oven to 450 degrees. Cut the squash in two at the base of the neck, discarding the hollow bulb end or reserving for another use. Peel the rest and slice into 1/2-inch disks. Toss the squash in a large roasting pan with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, thyme and salt and pepper to taste, and arrange in a single layer. Roast the squash, turning once halfway through, until tender and beginning to brown, about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet over medium heat, combine garlic and one tablespoon of the remaining olive oil. Sauté until fragrant and tender, about one minute. Add pecans and sugar, and toss until the sugar has melted and the pecans are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Whisk the vinegar into the remaining olive oil. Add the pecan mixture, currants and chili flakes. Mix well, and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Arrange the squash on a warm platter and top with some or all of the dressing.

TUNISIAN CARROT SALAD WITH CUMIN, CORIANDER AND CARAWAY

2 pounds carrots, peeled

1 teaspoon salt, or as needed

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground caraway

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1 teaspoon harissa or other hot sauce

Fresh lemon juice, as needed, optional

Bring a pot of water to a boil, and add carrots and 1 teaspoon salt. Boil until almost tender, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, set aside a bowl of ice water. Transfer cooked carrots to the ice bath and chill.

Drain carrots, and cut into disks about 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to a bowl and add olive oil. Sprinkle with cumin, caraway, and coriander. Add harissa or hot sauce, and mix gently. Season with lemon juice and salt to taste. Serve at room temperature.

POTATO KUGEL AND VARIATIONS

3 eggs

1 small onion, roughly chopped

2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

½ teaspoon salt, more or less to taste (I use much more)

1/8 teaspoon pepper, more or less to taste

1 tablespoon bread crumbs or matzo meal

4 large potatos, peeled and cut into chunks (about 2 pounds)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Put everything except the potatoes and 1 tablespoon oil in a food processor and whirl for about a minute, until smooth. Add the potatoes and pulse until chopped fine, but not smooth; don’t overprocess, you just want to avoid large chunks.

Put the last tablespoon of oil into a baking dish, about 8 inches square or round. Pour the potato mixture into the baking dish. Bake until brown crust forms on top, about 40 minutes. Allow to cool slightly before serving.

VARIATIONS: Replace up to half the potatoes with other vegetables—broccoli, summer or winter squash, carrots, stringbeans, yams, cauliflower. I find that if at least half of the vegetables are not potatoes, the texture isn’t good.


 
Sep
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News

CELERIAC

I’ve been waiting anxiously for the celeriac to arrive. I have two main uses for this ugly but delicious vegetable: I add it to chicken soup, which makes it much better every time; and I make celeriac remoulade, one of my favorite winter salads. David Lebovitz’s Celeriac Remoulade, below, includes good instructions for preparing celeriac.

I’ve included a few other celeriac recipes—in case we get enough so that I don’t use it all on celeriac remoulade. You’ll find general info about celery root here:

http://www.organicauthority.com/vegetables/celery-root.html

And a batch of recipes here:

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/celeriac-recipes/

CELERY REMOULADE (CÉLERI RÉMOULADE)

About six servings

Celery root is pretty easy to prepare, but does discolor a bit once sliced open and grated. So make the dressing before slicing and grating the celery root, for best results. I like mine really mustardy, so I use a fairly large amount. If you’re unsure, start with less; you can add more, to taste, when the salad is finished.

To peel celery root, lop off the root and opposite end with a chef’s knife. Then stand the round root on a flat end then take the knife and cut downward, working around the outside, to slice off the tough skin. In the states, celery root are often smaller, and have more complicated roots, and you’ll need to cut a bit deeper to remove them.

1/2 cup mayonnaise, homemade or store-bought

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard (more or less to taste)

1/2 teaspoon of sea salt, plus more, to taste

1 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

freshly ground black pepper

1 pound celery root

1. Mix together the mayonnaise, mustard, salt, lemon juice, and a few grinds of black pepper.

2. Peel the celery root and grate it coarsely.

3. Mix the dressing with the celery root and taste, adding additional salt, pepper, mustard, and lemon juice, to taste.

Note: If the salad is too thick, you can add a few spoonfuls of whole or low-fat milk to thin it out.

Storage: The salad will keep for one to two days in the refrigerator.

SOME NOTES ON CELERIAC REMOULADE FROM NIGEL SLATER

The French can buy this classic winter salad from any corner shop, whereas we probably have to make it ourselves. It is the best use of the knobbly, ivory-coloured root yet devised.

THE RECIPE

Peel then shred a medium-sized (1 pound) celeriac. The shreds should not be too fine, nor should they be thicker than a matchstick. Toss them immediately in the juice of half a lemon. Mix together 4 heaped tbsp of good mayonnaise, 2 tbsp of smooth Dijon mustard, 2 tbsp of heavy cream or crème fraîche and 2 tbsp of chopped parsley. Season with salt and black pepper, then fold into the shredded celeriac. Set aside for 30 minutes then serve with thin slices of ham.

THE TRICK

Toss the shredded roots quickly in lemon juice to stop them discolouring and to tenderise them. The dressing should be just thick enough to cling to the roots – in other words creamy without being soupy. Thin the sauce down with lemon juice if it gets too thick. Cream or crème fraîche sounds extravagant, but is essential if the salad is to be more than just roots in mayo. Don’t attempt to keep it overnight. It will become soft and claggy as the celeriac soaks up the dressing. Chop the parsley finely – this is not the time for roughly chopped.

THE TWIST

Beetroot remoulade has a more vibrant colour and a mixture of celeriac and beets is good, but should be lightly mixed so as not to turn the dressing raspberry pink. Poppy seeds, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds make unorthodox but welcome additions, as do chopped toasted walnuts. A lighter dressing can be made using fromage frais instead of crème fraîche.

CELERY ROOT POTATO MASH

3/4 lb russet potato, peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces

1 1/4 lbs celery root, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces

1 medium onion, peeled, chopped

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon brandy (optional)

1/4 cup sour cream (use lite if you wish)

1 tablespoon fresh dill, chopped (or use another fresh herb)

salt & pepper

Place the potatoes, celery root, onion & vinegar in a saucepan, cover with water, bring to a boil and simmer until the vegetable are cooked and tender. (apprx.25 minutes).

Drain the veggies, stir in the brandy, mash the vegetables. Leave them slightly chunky.

Stir in the sour cream & dill. Season with salt & pepper.

CELERIAC, CHICORY AND ORANGE SALAD WITH TOASTED CASHEWS

I love raw celeriac in a salad. Its flavour, both earthy and sweet, balances piquant, sharp or bitter ingredients beautifully. Serves four.

3 oz. cashew nuts

2 tbsp olive oil

½ tsp English mustard

2 tsp cider vinegar

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

12 oz. celeriac

1 head chicory

1 large orange

Put the nuts in a dry frying pan, toss over a medium heat for a few minutes until lightly toasted, then set aside to cool.

Combine the olive oil, mustard and vinegar with some salt and pepper, and tip into a mixing bowl. Peel the celeriac and cut it into matchsticks. Toss the julienned root immediately in the dressing to stop it from browning. Trim the chicory and separate the leaves, then add to the celeriac in the bowl. Spread the dressed celeriac and chicory on a plate.

Cut a slice off the base of the orange and stand it on a board. Use a sharp knife to cut through the peel and pith of the orange, slicing it away completely, in sections. Working over the plate of celeriac so any juice that escapes will fall on to it, cut out the individual orange segments, letting them drop on to the salad as you go. Squeeze any juice out of the remaining orange membrane over the salad. Add some more salt and pepper to taste, scatter over the cashews and serve.

POTATO LEEK SOUP WITH CELERIAC

FROM HELENE:  I just made a great soup with the celeriac and potatoes we just got!

Hopefully it’s useful! Tastes delish!

Ingredients:

2-3 medium leeks, chopped

1 sweet/vidalia onion, chopped

1 medium bulb of celeriac, peeled and diced into 1/4 in cubes

1 tbsp olive oil

8 tbsp butter, cut into 1 tbsp pieces

3 medium potatoes or 6-8 small potatoes, peeled & cut into chunks

6 cups chicken stock

4 sage leaves

salt & pepper

1/2 tsp dried thyme

1/2 tsp paprika (don’t add too much!)

1/2 cup heavy cream or half and half

Method:

1. Prep all ingredients.

2. Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil and 4 tbsp butter in a dutch oven/soup pot over medium heat.  Add celeriac, onions and leeks and sauté until the vegetables are soft and onion is translucent, about 5-10 minutes.

3. Add potatoes, chicken stock, sages and spices and bring to a boil.  Turn heat slightly down and simmer until potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork, about 20-25 minutes.

4. Turn off heat, let soup cool slightly and blend with a hand blender until smooth (alternatively transfer to a blender).  Return blended soup to the pot, add cream, rest of the butter and adjust season.  Simmer over low heat for another 10 minutes, garnish with chives, sour cream and olive oil, and serve hot.