Nov
07
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Keep Fresh

Store Brussels sprouts in a plastic bag in your refrigerator’s crisper, where they’ll keep for at least one week, if not a little longer. Sprouts still on the stalk will stay fresh longer than those sold individually. If you don’t plan on using them right away, stick the stalk in water and put it in the fridge—as you would do with fresh herbs on the stem—then break sprouts off the stalk as needed.

Draw Out Flavors

Steaming or microwaving Brussels sprouts ensures you’ll get the most nutrients from the vegetable, but for many people, taste trumps nutrition. Brussels sprouts can be sliced or shaved thinly and eaten raw, while roasting brings out a robust, sweet, almost nutty flavor. If you want to convert a Brussels sprouts hater, simply toss the sprouts with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and stick them in a 425°F oven for approximately 30 minutes. Alternatively, you can pan-fry sliced sprouts for crunch and texture.

Cook to Perfection

Memories of overcooked Brussels sprouts—mainly boiled—are probably to blame for most people’s dislike of the vegetable, so take care when cooking them. Start by removing any discolored outer leaves. You’ll want to discard any sprouts that are soft. If you’re boiling or steaming, cut an X in the stem so the heat can reach the thicker core. The sprouts should be tender in about five to eight minutes. To roast, cut them in half (or at least the same size) to ensure even cooking.

MAPLE-LEMON SPROUTS

Cook sprouts in any of the ways noted above, but stop cooking a minute or two before they’re done. Drain completely. For about 2 cups of sprouts, whole or sliced, combine teaspoon oil, 1 tablespoon maple syrup, and 1 teaspoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice; heat the mixture in a frying pan. Add the cook sprouts and toss for about 2 minutes.

KALE AND BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD

From the Food network—can also be made with bok choy

3 cups Brussels sprouts

1 large bunch Tuscan kale, center stems discarded

1 small clove garlic

1 small shallot

1 cup finely grated pecorino

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

3 lemons, zested and juiced

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a food processor fitted with a slicing blade, shred the Brussels sprouts. Next, shred the kale. Add the garlic and shallot and shred. (Alternatively, shred and mince the vegetables with a knife.) Set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the pecorino, olive oil, pine nuts, mustard, lemon zest and juice and salt and pepper to taste. Add in the shredded vegetables and toss well to combine. Let the salad sit for 10 minutes before serving to allow the dressing to permeate the greens.

Recipe courtesy of Nancy Fuller

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH GINGER, RAISINS, AND PECANS

(apapted from Real Simple)

preparation 15 minutes cooking 40 minutes

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved

1/2 cup pecans, roughly chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1/4 cup golden raisins, plumped in 1/4 cup water and drained

kosher salt and black pepper

1. Heat oven to 400° F. On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the Brussels sprouts, pecans, oil, garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Turn the Brussels sprouts cut-side down.

2. Roast until golden and tender, 20 to 25 minutes.

3. Toss with the raisins and ginger; serve hot

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND APPLES

1/2 cup diced apple

8 ounces Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered

2 tablespoons apple cider

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 375°.

2. Combine apple and Brussels sprouts in an 11 x 7–inch baking dish. Add apple cider, olive oil, minced fresh thyme, salt, and freshly ground black pepper; toss well. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until sprouts are tender.

BRUSSELS SPROUT RISOTTO

Yotam Ottolenghi is chef/patron of Ottolenghi and Nopi in London. Serves four as side dish, 2 as main.

This dish is way too complicated for my taste, but some of you mentioned that you like the Jerusalem cookbook and complicated recipes. I haven’t tested it.

1 tbs unsalted butter

2 tbsp olive oil

2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped

2 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

2 tbsp picked thyme leaves

2 lemons, 1 shaved into long strips of zest and 1 finely grated

1/2 cup risotto rice

1 lb trimmed brussels sprouts, half shredded and half quartered

1 cup dry white wine

2 cups vegetable stock

Salt and black pepper

About 1/2 cup sunflower oil

2 tbs parmesan, roughly grated

2 tbs dolcelatte, broken up into roughly 1/4” chunks (or use a different blue cheese)

1/2 tsp tarragon, chopped

2 tsp lemon juice

Put the butter and olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. When the oil is hot and the butter melted, add the onion and fry for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft and lightly caramelised. Add the garlic, thyme and lemon strips, and cook for two minutes more. Add the rice and shredded sprouts, and cook for a minute, stirring frequently. Pour over the wine and let it simmer for a minute before you start adding the stock, a teaspoon of salt and a good grind of pepper. Reduce the heat to medium and carry on adding the stock ladle by ladle, stirring often, until the rice is cooked but still retains a bite, and all the stock is used up – about 15-20 minutes.

While the rice is cooking, pour the sunflower oil into a second large saucepan; it should come 2cm up the sides. Place on a high heat and, once very hot, use a slotted spoon to add a handful of the quartered sprouts, making sure they are completely dry first; they will still splutter, so be careful. Fry for less than a minute, until golden and crisp, then transfer to plate lined with kitchen paper. Keep warm while you fry the remaining sprouts.

Add the parmesan, dolcelatte, tarragon and half the fried sprouts to the risotto and stir gently. Serve at once, spooning on the remaining sprouts and topping with the grated lemon zest and a dribble of juice.

While the rice is cooking, pour the sunflower oil into a second large saucepan; it should come 2cm up the sides. Place on a high heat and, once very hot, use a slotted spoon to add a handful of the quartered sprouts, making sure they are completely dry first; they will still splutter, so be careful. Fry for less than a minute, until golden and crisp, then transfer to plate lined with kitchen paper. Keep warm while you fry the remaining sprouts.
Add the parmesan, dolcelatte, tarragon and half the fried sprouts to the risotto and stir gently. Serve at once, spooning on the remaining sprouts and topping with the grated lemon zest and a dribble of juice.


 
Nov
07
    
Posted (Lori) in News

THANKSGIVING RECIPES

BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND CIDER BISQUE:

from Recipes from America’s Small Farms, p. 160. I always feel like I’m a better cook when I make this soup. It has a hint of curry, which adds more flavor than most squash soups. It can be made in advance and is a good way to start the Thanksgiving meal.

ROASTED GARLIC

Not a real recipe, but I don’t think I’ve used this great tip because we didn’t get garlic until this week. Just slice off the top of a whole, unpeeled garlic bulb, exposing the tops of the cloves. Wrap the whole thing loosely in aluminum foil and place on a  pan in a 400 degree oven. Roast for about 45 minutes, checking every 5 minutes after 30 minutes. You’ll know when it’s ready by poking the tops of the cloves with a toothpick; they will become totally soft. Take the garlic out and allow to cool completely. Garlic becomes stronger and easier to use when roasted. When cool, you can separate the cloves and squirt out the garlic like toothpaste, no need to mash or mince. I sometimes spread the garlic on toast, and add a slice of cheese.

BEETS WITH HORSERADISH CREME FRAICHE

From Christian Shaffer. Los Angeles Times

About 1 pound of beets, red, gold, or Chioggia, quartered if large

1 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar (or balsamic)

3 tbs good-quality olive oil

1/4 teaspoon toasted ground coriander seeds

1 small shallot, minced

1/2 cup creme fraiche—see note below on how to make creme fraiche

1 tablespoons prepared horseradish

1 tablespoons kosher salt, divided

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1 tablespoons fresh chervil or parsley, whole leaves or rough chopped

1. Boil the beets in enough water to cover, with 1 tablespoon salt, until tender, about an hour.

2. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, oil, coriander and shallot and set the mixture aside for 30 minutes. In another bowl, combine the creme fraiche, horseradish, one-quarter teaspoon salt and pepper and set aside.

3. Drain the beets and, while still warm, peel them. Slice them into wedges, about 8 to 10 per beet, and cool.

4. Pour the vinegar mixture over the beets and let stand, covered, at room temperature for an hour. Spoon the horseradish cream onto a platter, covering the bottom. Using a slotted spoon, mound the beets over the cream. Garnish the beets with the chervil and serve.

CREME FRAICHE is a lot like sour cream, but better. You can buy it in cartons, but it’s pricey; it’s easy to make and I think the homemade version is better.

Instructions from Epicurious: Combine 1 cup whipping cream and 2 tablespoons buttermilk in a glass container. Cover and let stand at room temperature (about 70°F) from 8 to 24 hours, or until very thick. Stir well before covering and refrigerate up to 10 days.

I know—leaving the cream outside the refrigerator for 8 to 24 hours sounds wrong. But it doesn’t go bad, it gets better.

MASHED POTATOES WITH FRIZZLED LEEKS

I don’t think we need a recipe for mashed potatoes, but in case some of you don’t know—one of the best ways to achieve fluffy mashed potatoes is with a ricer; they cost about $10 and it takes just a few minutes to turn boiled potatoes into the fluffiest, softest mashed potatoes ever.

I like my mashed potatoes plain, with just a bit of butter/cream/milk. But you can also add roasted garlic, olive oil, herbs and spices, or other vegetables. I sometimes boil peeled carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, turnips, winter squash, &/or parsnips (especially parnsips) with potatoes  and then rice them all together.

The frizzled leeks make this a little fancier, and they take just five minutes to make. Slice off the hairy top of the leek and then cut thin horizontal slices—just until after the leek turns from white to pale green. Divide the leek slices into rings Mix 2 tablespoons of flour with 1/4 tsp salt and a pinch of pepper in a shallow bowl or plate; add 1 tablespoon of flour. Mix and add more water,  a little at a time, until you get a thin paste.  Toss the leek rings in the flour paste. Pour a neutral oil into your smallest pot until it comes about 2 inches up the sides. Prepare a slotted spoon and a plate lined with paper towels. Put one leek ring in the pot over medium heat; when it begins to sizzle, toss in the rest of the leek rings. In less than 30 seconds, they will brown and frizzle. Remove the frizzled leeks with the slotted spoon immediately—or they will burn—and drain on the paper towels. Serve over mashed potatoes.

I usually do this right before I serve them, but it can also be done in advance.

CHEF JOHN’S COLCANNON (submitted by Lee’at)

3 large russet potatoes, peeled and quartered

2 tablespoons butter at room temperature

4 ounces kale, trimmed and chopped

1 leek, light parts only, rinsed and chopped

1 bunch green onions, chopped, white and green parts separated

2 tablespoons butter at room temperature

salt and ground black pepper to taste

1/4 cup heavy whipping cream

2 tablespoons butter, for serving

1/4 cup green onions to garnish

Boil potatoes in a large pot of salted water until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and transfer potatoes to a large bowl. Add 2 tablespoons butter and lightly mash the potatoes.

Boil kale and leeks in a large pot of water until tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Drain and transfer kale and leeks to a blender. Add white parts of the green onions and 2 more tablespoons butter; blend until smooth, scraping down sides as needed, 1 to 3 minutes.

Stir pureed kale mixture into the bowl of potatoes and continue to mash. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add cream and stir until desired texture. Top with 2 tablespoons butter and green parts of the green onions.

Chef’s Note: You can substitute kale with other leafy greens such as Swiss chard or cabbage.

PILAF WITH KALE

Adapted from ZAHAV, A World of Israeli Cooking, Michael Solomonov

2 cups jasmine rice

Kosher salt

¼ cup olive oil

½ cup sliced onion

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 cups (packed) finely minced kale

½ tsp. ground pepper

pinch ancho, urfa, or another smokey pepper

2 cups rich chicken stock

1 tbs finely ground lemon zest

Cover the rice by several inches in a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Let soak for at least one hour and up to overnight. Drain well.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. War the oil in a large ovenproof pot with a tight fitting lid over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables just barely begin to soften, about 4 minutes. Add the kale and peppers and cook until the kale is tender, another 5 minutes. Add the rice and cook, stirring until the rice is evenly cooked and begins to lightly toast, about 3 minute more.

Add the chicken stock and lemon zest, raise the heat to high and bring to a simmer. Stir with a fork once or twice, add 1 tsp salt, cover and transfer to the oven, Bake until the rice is cooked through, 15 to 20 minutes. Let stand off the heat, covered for 20 minutes before fluffing the rice with a fork.

PATCHWORK PIE

This one-crust, bottomless pie is great after a big meal; you won’t miss the bottom crust, especially if you’re using sweet local apples. Marc Bittman used stone fuit when he published this recipe in the NYT a few years ago, but I find it makes a great apple pie. I sometimes add cranberries or raisins to the fruit.

8 tablespoons (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into about 8 pieces, more for dish

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, more for rolling

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar

3 cups sliced apples and pears,about  1/4” thick

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 cup brown sugar

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice.

Heat oven to 400 degrees and butter a 9-by-13-inch or similar-size baking dish; set aside. In a food processor, combine 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour, the salt and 1 tablespoon sugar; pulse once or twice. Add butter and turn on machine; process until butter and flour are blended and mixture looks like coarse cornmeal, about 15 to 20 seconds. Slowly add 1/4 cup ice water through feed tube and process until just combined. Form dough into a flat disk, wrap in plastic and freeze for 10 minutes or refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. (You can refrigerate dough for up to a couple of days, or freeze it, tightly wrapped, for up to a couple of weeks.)

NOTE: I find that this is enough for two pie crusts. I divide the dough into two discs, and if I’m not making two pies, I freeze one).

2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl toss fruit with remaining flour, white and brown sugar, cinnamon. and lemon juice; place in baking dish.

3. Put dough on a floured board or countertop and sprinkle with more flour. Roll dough into a 12-inch round, adding flour and rotating and turning dough as needed. Cut dough into 3-inch-wide strips, then cut again crosswise into 4-inch-long pieces. Scatter pieces over fruit in an overlapping patchwork pattern.

4. Brush top of dough lightly with water and sprinkle with remaining tablespoon sugar. Transfer to oven and bake until top is golden brown and juices bubble, 35 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool; serve warm or at room temperature.

Yield: 6 to 8 servings.

I was looking for new recipes and realized I haven’t used two of my very favorites this year. Both of  these are perfect anytime, but I usually make them on Thanksgiving Day and we snack on them as we work on the big meal.

BAGNA CAUDA

The name means “hot bath” and the only challenging part of this incredibly flavorful recipe is keeping it warm. I sometimes serve it right off the stovetop; it’s a great snack for the cooks or for guests who hang around the kitchen. For later in the meal, I put a small oven-safe bowl on a tiny hotplate that’s used to keep coffee cups warm.

1 tbs butter

1/4 cup olive oil

4-5 cloves garlic, finely minced or crushed

2-3 anchovy filets, mashed or more to tate

splash of cream (optional)

vegetables and/or bread for dipping

Put the butter and oil in a very small saucepan over low heat. When the butter is melted add the garlic and let it cook, stirring occasionally and watching to make sure it doesn’t burn.It should simmer, but not come to a full boil It will be very fragrant and in about 5 minutes the garlic will be soft. Add the anchovies and keep stirring until they all but disappear. If you wish, add a bit a cream and stir again to combine. Serve hot, with crudités such as asparagus, celery sticks, carrots, turnips, and cauliflower, or bread (usually, people ignore the vegetables and go for the bread).

FOCACCIA

This is one of those Eureka recipes. Simple, fast, versatile, delicious. There’s no salt in the dough, which is why it rises so quickly. It’s finished in about an hour, start to ready-to-eat with only about 15 minutes of active prep time.

It’s fine plain—but toppings turn it into a delicious full meal. Try it with ratatouille; braised greens; anchovies and cheese; olives and capers; carmelized onions. The topping should be warm or hot when spread; after spreading the topping, you can put it back into a warm oven for a few minutes.  I sometimes split the focaccia horizontally and use it for sandwiches, such as egg salad with thinly sliced radish or broiled zucchini, eggplant, pepper, and onion. Focaccia is fine cold and day-old—but not as amazing as it is straight from the oven.

I found this recipe of Allrecipes, just sitting there among all the other recipes that are not as fantastic.

1 tsp white sugar

1 pkg (.25 ounce, 2 ¼ tsp) active dry yeast

1/3 cup warm water

2 cups flour

2 tbs. olive oil

1/2 tsp coarse salt

1. In a small bowl, dissolve sugar and yeast in warm water. Let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.

2. In a large bowl, combine the yeast mixture with flour; stir well to combine. Stir in additional water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until all of the flour is absorbed. When the dough has pulled together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly for about 1 minute.

3. Lightly oil a large bowl, place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 30 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 475 degrees F (245 degrees C).

5. Deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface; knead briefly. Pat or roll the dough into a sheet and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Brush the dough with oil and sprinkle with salt.

6. Bake focaccia in preheated oven for 10 to 20 minutes, depending on desired crispness. If you like it moist and fluffy, then you’ll have to wait just about 10 minutes. If you like it crunchier and darker in the outside, you may have to wait 20 minutes.


 
Oct
30
    
Posted (Lori) in News

DAIKONS

I’m always happy to get daikons—there are so many ways to use them.

–Slice them thinly and layer into sandwiches; smoked turkey with daikon and egg salad with daikon are two possibilities.

–Make slices a bit thicker and use them as crudités; they are great with hummus and techina

–Shred them; peel, cut into chunks and put them in food processor. Whirl for just a few seconds. Throw them into salads or eat as a side dish. One of my favorite salads is bok choy, watercress, shredded daikon with tahini-soy sauce.

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Daikon with Crisp Tofu (Mark Bittman)

Makes: 4 servings

This has everything you want in a stir-fry: delicious bok choy, with its wonderfully creamy stems; sharp daikon radish; crusty pan-fried tofu; and a load of spice.

Tempeh, the nutty fermented soybean cake, also goes beautifully with bok choy. If you want to use it in place of the tofu, crumble it into the hot oil and stir until it’s crisp, 5 to 7 minutes.

1 head bok choy

4 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 block firm tofu (about 1 pound), cut into 1?4-inch slices and patted dry

1 onion, chopped

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon minced ginger

1 or 2 fresh hot chiles (like jalapeño or Thai), seeded and minced

8 ounces daikon radish, cut into 1?4-inch coins

2 tablespoons soy sauce, or to taste

Black pepper

1. Cut the leaves from the stems of the bok choy. Trim the stems as necessary, then cut them into 1-inch pieces. Cut the leaves into wide ribbons and keep them separate from the stems.

2. Put 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, slide in the tofu, working in batches if necessary to avoid overcrowding the pan. Cook until the bottoms are crisp and golden, 3 to 5 minutes; carefully  flip and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes on the other side. When the tofu slices are done, transfer them to paper towels to drain.

3. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons oil to the pan and raise the heat to medium-high. When it’s hot, add the onion, garlic, ginger, and chile and cook, stirring, for just 1 minute. Add the bok choy stems and daikon and cook, stirring occasionally, until they just lose their crunch, about 3 minutes.

4. Add the bok choy leaves and about 1?2 cup water. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid evaporates and the stems and radish are fully tender, 5 to 10 minutes; add a little more water if necessary. Return the tofu to the pan, stir in the soy sauce, and sprinkle with black pepper. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve hot or at room temperature.

CARROT & DAIKON PICKLES (SAVEUR)

MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

½ lb. carrots, peeled and cut into matchsticks

1½ lbs. daikon, peeled and cut into matchsticks

2 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. plus ¼ cup sugar

½ cup plus 2 tbsp. white vinegar

1. In a bowl, combine the carrots, daikon, salt, and 1 tsp. sugar. Let sit until the vegetables have wilted slightly and liquid pools at the bottom of the bowl, about 30 minutes. Drain vegetables; rinse and pat dry with paper towels. Transfer vegetables to a medium bowl.

2. Whisk together the remaining sugar, the vinegar, and ½ cup warm water and pour mixture over the vegetables. Stir to combine. Set mixture aside to let marinate for at least 1 hour or refrigerate, tightly covered, for up to 4 weeks.

SMITA CHANDRA’S DAIKON CURRY

Note from Lori: I left out the carom seeds and the dried mango; it’s delicious without them, maybe better if you can find them)

2 tbsp. canola oil

1/2 tsp. ajwain (carom) seeds

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped

1 lb. daikon with greens, peeled and cut into ½” pieces, greens trimmed and roughly chopped

1/2 tsp. ground coriander

1/2 tsp. ground cumin

1/2 tsp. ground turmeric

1/4 tsp. red chile powder, such as cayenne

1 tsp. amchur (green mango) powder

Kosher salt, to taste

Chapatis, for serving (optional)

Heat oil in a 12? skillet over medium-high heat. Cook carom seeds until they pop, 1-2 minutes. Add garlic and onion; cook until golden, 5–7 minutes. Stir in daikon and its leaves, the coriander, cumin, turmeric, and chile powder. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, covered, and stirring occasionally, until daikon is tender, about 20 minutes. Stir in amchur and salt; serve with chapatis, if you like.


 
Oct
17
    
Posted (Lori) in News

We’re getting lots of cauliflower this week, so I’m bumping the post:

CAULIFLOWER; scroll down for specific Romanesco info—but Romanesco can be used in any cauliflower recipe.

I’ve seen several recipes that use cauliflower as “mock mashed potatoes”—cooking it until it loses its crunch and texture and then mashing it. I find it offensive to both the cauliflower and the potato—cauliflower has its own advantages, but it’s not a potato.

It’s not easy to face down a cauliflower. It usually doesn’t break apart as easily as a head of broccoli and needs a sharp knife to cut it into bite-sized pieces, The core and leaves have to be cut away and composted, though the stems are just as good as the flowers.

Cauliflower can be boiled or steamed to soften it—but my choice is raw, cooked lightly, or roasted.

Raw, it does well in a marinade, as below, or as a crudite with any dip or dunk. If you’re not a fan of very crunchy vegetables, cook it briefly before marinating, as in the salad below. There are also instructions for roasting below. Cauliflower is also great in a gratin, often mixed with broccoli. See general gratin instructions in Recipes from America’s Small Farms, p. 25. And there’s a more complicated Cauliflower Cheese Pie on p. 74.

CURRIED WINTER STEW WITH CAULIFLOWER AND WINTER SQUASH

This recipe appeared in the NYT (David Tanis) late last fall and it became one of my favorites instantly. It uses only one pan (plus whatever you cook the chickpeas in) and is a full meal, especially if you add rice and raita. I have not included the raita recipe because it was not especially great and took a lot of work—raita is easy, just add diced vegetables (radish is perfect, cucumber is good too) to yogurt. They suggest apple, which was just ok. Add curry powder, cayenne, diced hot pepper, or hot sauce. Mix the whole thing up, allow to sit in the refrigerator and bit and serve cold.

The first time I made this recipe, I followed it exactly, using the spice seeds and individual ground spices. I found the spice was too weak overall; now I just use pre-mixed curry powder. I start with a tablespoon and keep adding until it tastes right. I also add chopped greens to the stew, at the same time as the chickpeas—and sometimes string beans as well..

3 tablespoons untoasted sesame oil or vegetable oil

½ teaspoon cumin seeds

½ teaspoon coriander seeds

½ teaspoon turmeric

¼ teaspoon cayenne

1 2-inch piece of ginger, grated

6 small garlic cloves, minced

4 small hot red Asian chiles or Mexican chiles de árbol

1 large onion, diced, about 2 cups

Salt and pepper

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 cups delicata squash, unpeeled, in 1-inch slices, or butternut squash, peeled, in 1-inch cubes

1 cup parsnips, hard center core removed, in 1-inch slices or chunks

½ pound tiny potatoes, such as fingerlings, halved

2 cups small florets of cauliflower

1 cup cooked chickpeas, preferably home-cooked and the liquid reserved

Cilantro sprigs, for garnish

Steamed basmati rice (optional)

Apple raita (optional),

PREPARATION

1. Put oil in a wide, heavy pot over medium-high heat. When oil is wavy, add cumin seeds and coriander seeds and let sizzle for about 1 minute. Add turmeric, cayenne, ginger, garlic and chiles and stir to coat.

2. Add onion and season generously with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until softened and lightly colored, about 10 minutes. Add tomato paste and stir to coat. Add squash, parsnips and potatoes, salt lightly, then add 3 cups chickpea cooking liquid or water, or enough to just cover vegetables. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a brisk simmer. Cover and cook until vegetables are tender but firm, about 15 minutes.

3. Add cauliflower and chickpeas and stir gently to combine. Cover and continue cooking 5 to 8 minutes more, until cauliflower is tender. Taste broth and adjust seasoning, then transfer to a wide, deep serving platter or bowl. Garnish with cilantro sprigs. Serve with steamed basmati rice and apple raita, if desired.

MARINATED CAULIFLOWER SALAD

From Martha Stewart Living

1 large head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), cut into small florets

1/4 cup white-wine vinegar

1/4 cup finely chopped red onion

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

2 tablespoons brine-packed capers, drained and rinsed

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Blanch cauliflower until just tender, about 2 minutes; work in batches if your pot is not big enough. Drain; transfer to a bowl.

Whisk together vinegar, onion, and mustard in a small bowl. Pour in oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over warm cauliflower, and add capers and parsley. Stir to combine.

Cover, and refrigerate overnight or up to 1 day. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Roasted Cauliflower with Almonds and Kalamata Olives

5-6 cups of cauliflower florets

2 tbs olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tbs lemon juice; and 1 tbs zest from an organic lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

¼ cup crumbled goat or feta cheese (if desired)

¼ cup blanched or slivered almonds, toasted

¼ cup sliced kalamata (or other) olives

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.

Place the cauliflower florets in a large saute pan or a roasting pan. Drizzle the olive oil over the cauliflower, and season with the garlic, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Place the saute/roasting pan in the oven and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally to ensure even roasting. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with the cheese. Add the almonds and olives and toss until combined. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Roasted Cabbage & Cauliflower Salad With Peanut Dressing

1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets

1 head of cabbage,thinly sliced

1/4 cup olive oil

1 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

1 (15oz) can chickpeas – or 2 cups of homemade beans, warmed

1/4 cup green onions or chives, sliced (optional)

Peanut Sauce

1/3 cup creamy peanut butter

2 Tbsp brown rice vinegar

1 clove garlic, chopped

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes

1/3 cup cup hot water

1. Preheat over to 400 degrees.

2. Place cauliflower and cabbage onto a baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Mix well and roast for 30 minutes or until cabbage and cauliflower are browned.

3. Meanwhile, mix together peanut sauce and set aside. You can add more water to thin the dressing if needed.

4. Once cauliflower and cabbage are done, let cool for a few minutes then mix cauliflower, cabbage and chickpeas together. Add more salt and pepper as needed.

5. Serve over grain of choice or greens and drizzle with peanut sauce. Garnish with green onion or chives if using.

ROMANESCO

What the Heck Is Romanesco and How Do You Cook It?

Lindsay Lowe, Parade.com

One of the more unusual vegetables we’ve come across, Romanesco appears to be part psychedelic broccoli, part alien life form.

In fact, it’s an edible flower from the family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage. It tastes very similar to cauliflower, but with a slightly nuttier, earthier flavor. You can use it as you would cauliflower in recipes, and it holds up to many different cooking methods.

“Romanesco can be served raw, lightly cooked, or cooked through,” said Mario Batali in a column for the Seattle Times last fall. “I usually sauté it slowly with garlic and lemon zest, and punctuate with red pepper flakes for zing.”

It’s also delicious steamed and lightly seasoned with olive oil and red wine vinegar.

Of course, the most fascinating part of Romanesco is its appearance. Its spiraled buds form a natural approximation of a fractal, meaning each bud in the spiral is composed of a series of smaller buds. (Remember the Fibonacci sequence from school? The spirals follow the same logarithmic pattern).

The Romanesco (sometimes called Romanesco Broccoli or Roman Cauliflower) did not always exist in nature. Many botanists believe it was the result of selective breeding by Italian farmers in the 16th century.

Romanesco is in season during from late summer to early fall, and it can often be found at local farmers’ markets, especially along the Eastern Seaboard. Just as when shopping for regular broccoli or cauliflower, look for firm, heavy heads free from discoloration or withered florets. To store in the fridge, keep in a tightly sealed bag.

ROASTED ROMANESCO

Ingredients

1 head Romanesco, cut into bite-size pieces

1 tablespoon olive oil, or more to taste

salt to taste

2 grinds fresh black pepper

1 pinch garlic powder

1 pinch paprika

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.

Spread Romanesco onto the prepared baking sheet; drizzle with olive oil and season with salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and paprika.

Roast in the preheated oven until tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

Tip

Aluminum foil helps keep food moist, ensures it cooks evenly, keeps leftovers fresh, and makes clean-up easy.

ANJALI’S ROMANESCO SALAD

Makes 2 servings as a main course or 4 to 6 as a side course

Romanesco is an Italian heirloom cauliflower with bright green,

fractal-like florets. It was previously found only at niche markets, but

thankfully, more farmers are growing Romanesco across the country.

If you cannot find Romanesco, any kind of cauliflower will do. When

steamed or boiled, Romanesco is silky tender and goes well with

crispy or salty embellishments and the richness of the eggs. If I had

them in the pantry, chopped anchovies would be excellent with these

flavors, as would a side of white beans fragrant with olive oil. Equally

delicious warm or cold, this can be a quick supper or lunch made a

day ahead.

–Walnuts can replace the pine nuts, and olive oil can substitute for the walnut

oil, which is sometimes difficult to find.

–To make fresh breadcrumbs, it’s preferable to use a loaf of bread that is at

least a day old. Slice off the crusts and cut the bread in to large pieces. Using

a food processor or blender, break the bread into large crumbs, taking care

to not overcrowd the processor, which could cause the bread to clump instead

of breaking down. Put the breadcrumbs on a baking sheet and toast in the oven

at 350 degrees for about 12 minutes until light golden brown.

1 large Romanesco, cut into approx.. 5 irregular pieces

3 large 10-minute eggs, peeled, halved, or quartered

¾ cup/30g coarse breadcrumbs, toasted

¼ cup/30g pine nuts,lightly toasted

1 cup/35g salt-packed capers, rinsed, chopped

2 Tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley

1/2 tsp fresh thyme leaves

1 Tbsp walnut oil, plus more for garnish

1 Tbsp olive oil, plus more for garnish

1 Tbsp sherry vinegar,plus more for garnish

Sea salt

Ground black pepper

In a large pot fitted with a steamer basket and enough water to steam, add the Romanesco and steam until just tender, 4-6 minutes.

Arrange the cooked Romanesco and eggs on a serving platter.

Combine the breadcrumbs, pine nuts, capers, parsley, thyme, walnut oil, olive oil, and vinegar in a medium bowl, season with salt and pepper, and mix well. Scatter over the Romanesco and eggs. Drizzle a little more walnut oil, olive oil, and/or vinegar over the top and serve.


 
Oct
17
    
Posted (Lori) in News

ROASTING

CREAMY CAULIFLOWER PUREE WITH TOASTED FENNEL SEEDS

https://andreabeaman.com/silky-cauliflower-puree-with-toasted-fennel-seeds/

Andrea write: Besides all the nutritional blah blah blah about cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower being good for our health, when prepared correctly, it’s totally delicious.

Apparently, cauliflower is all the rage in the Paleo and Keto communities as well – I’ve seen this veggie prepared like rice, mashed potatoes, casseroles and soups.

I really LOVE it when it’s roasted, or pureed into a smooth and silky treat. So, that’s what we’ve got… cauliflower two ways; roasted AND pureed.

Prep time: 15 mins; Cook time: 35 mins; Total time: 50 mins

Author: Andrea Beaman

Recipe type: Local and seasonal

Cuisine: Delicious

Serves: 4 servings

Ingredients

1 small head Romanesco broccoli florets, plus ¼ cup cauliflower florets

Olive oil

Black pepper

1 large head cauliflower (or 4 cups of florets)

4-5 large garlic cloves, peeled

2 & ½ cups vegetable stock (water or milk of your choice)

3-4 tbsp. grass-fed butter

1 tsp. sea salt

1 tbsp. fennel seeds

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375.

Chop romanesco and ¼ cup cauliflower into small florets.

Put florets into a mixing bowl and lightly coat with olive oil, sea salt and black pepper.

Place onto a baking tray and bake 30-35 minutes.

While romanesco and florets are baking, bring remaining cauliflower (4 cups), garlic, stock, butter and 1 tsp. sea salt to a boil in a soup pot.

Reduce heat to simmer, cover and cook 15 minutes.

Pour soup ingredients into a food processor or Vitamix.

Puree until smooth and creamy.

Ladle puree into a soup bowl and top with roasted romanesco and cauliflower florets.

In a small frying pan, lightly toast fennel seeds on a low heat for 5-7 minutes (or until lightly toasted and fragrant).

Top with toasted fennel seeds.

BUTTER-GLAZED ROASTED RADISHES WITH FRESH HERBS RECIPE

Daniel Gritzer, Serious Eats

Radishes are usually thought of as a raw-only vegetable, but they’re delicious roasted, too, which tames their spicy flavor considerably. Here, they’re roasted until tender and bursting with juice, then tossed with melted butter and fresh herbs.

Serves 4 as a side dish

ACTIVE TIME: 10 minutes   TOTAL TIME: 45 minutes

Ingredients:

About 1 pound  radishes, without greens larger radishes halved or quartered so that all pieces are roughly the same size

Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

Kosher salt

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Minced fresh tarragon and parsley leaves, for garnish

Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C) and line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.

In a medium mixing bowl, toss radishes with just enough olive oil to coat and season with salt. Arrange in an even layer on the prepared baking sheet and roast in oven, stirring occasionally, until radishes are tender and very lightly browned, about 40 minutes.

In a medium skillet, melt butter. Add radishes and toss to coat. Remove from heat and stir in just enough minced herbs to lightly coat radishes. Season with salt, if needed. Serve.

STIR-FRYING
STIR-FRIED BOK CHOY WITH GINGER AND GARLIC

Recipe courtesy of Robin Miller, The Food Network

Total:10 minPrep: 5 min Cook: 5 min

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

8 cups chopped fresh bok choy

2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

Salt and ground black pepper

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and cook 1 minute. Add bok choy and soy sauce cook 3 to 5 minutes, until greens are wilted and stalks are crisp-tender. Season, to taste, with salt and black pepper.

MAPLE ROOT-VEGETABLE STIR-FRY WITH SESAME

Adapted from David Chang, Food & Wine

In Korea, cooks typically create stir-fries with just one kind of vegetable—lotus root, say, or potatoes. David Chang decided to break with tradition and stir-fry an assortment of vegetables, including Jerusalem artichokes and parsnips. Also unconventional is the maple syrup he adds to the dish; there are maple trees all around South Korea but not much maple syrup.

Note—any root vegetables can be used in ths recipe, including turnips and radishes

1/4 cup canola oil

3/4 pound Jerusalem artichokes, scrubbed and sliced 1/3 inch thick

2 carrots, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

2 parsnips, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

1/2 pound potatoes, slices

1 cup fresh lotus root, peeled and sliced (about 5 ounces), optional

1/4 cup pure maple syrup

1/4 cup soy sauce

A few drops of toasted sesame oil

1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

2 scallions, thinly sliced

Preheat the oven to 375°. In a large ovenproof skillet, heat the canola oil until shimmering. Add the Jerusalem artichokes, carrots, parsnips and potatoes and cook over moderately high heat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 8 minutes. Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast for about 20 minutes, until all the vegetables are tender.

Add the sliced lotus root to the skillet along with the maple syrup and soy sauce. Cook the vegetables over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until the sauce becomes syrupy and the vegetables are glazed, about 8 minutes. Stir the sesame oil, sesame seeds and sliced scallions into the vegetables and serve immediately.

BOILED

MULTI-ROOT MASH

Root vegetables stand up to boiling; mixing several of them together and then blending their flavors by mashing or pureeing them produces a dish that’s more interesting and nutritious than plain mashed potatoes. I find that my favorite results include sweet potatoes and parsnips, but I also use white potatoes, radishes, turnips, kohlrabi, onions, and beets.

1-2 onions or leeks, slices

1-2 tablespoons butter

For each serving: 4-6 ounces of peeled root vegetables, cut into even-sized pieces

Milk (almond or soy are fine), cream, sour cream, butter to taste

Salt, pepper, herbs, spices to taste

Melt the butter in a heavy pot; sauté the onions/leeks until soft. Add the root vegetables and toss to coat. Add water so that everything is covered by about 3 inches and bring to a boil. Then reduce heat, cover and simmer until all the vegetables are very soft (they may soften at different times, but it’s ok to keep simmering until your last vegetable is softened, even if some of them become mushy.

When everything is soft, drain any leftover water into a jar—DON’T THROW IT AWAY, it makes a great stock. Using a potato masher, mash everything together (or if you prefer, puree with a stick blender). Add a bit of milk, cream or butter and season to taste.

You can also thin this with stock, water, or any kind of milk or cram and serve it as a soup.