Jun
20
    
Posted (Lori) in News

FROM AMERICAN MUSEUM ON NATURAL HISTORY “Global Kitchen”:

Today, Muslims mark the end of the holy month of Ramadan with the holiday of Eid al-Fitr. In many homes, a fabulous feast is prepared, celebrating the end of Ramadan’s dawn-to-sunset fasting.
For the previous month, Muslims have abstained from food during the day in order to reflect on self-restraint and generosity, to be mindful of those less fortunate who may not always have food on the table, and to purify their bodies and minds.
The Islamic calendar is based on lunar cycles and the beginning of Eid al-Fitr is signaled by the first sighting of the new moon. During the day, families will celebrate with a special meal—the first they’ve had during daylight hours in a month.
Traditional foods made for Eid vary from country to country: Egyptians may enjoy a holiday treat of kahk—cookies filled with honey and nuts and covered in powdered sugar; Pakistanis shop for vermicelli to make a sweet pudding called seviyan; and Indonesian kitchens are cooking up ketupat—rice dumplings wrapped in palm leaves.
This Saturday, Muslims mark the end of the holy month of Ramadan with the holiday of Eid al-Fitr. In many homes, a fabulous feast is prepared, celebrating the end of Ramadan’s dawn-to-sunset fasting.
For the previous month, Muslims have abstained from food during the day in order to reflect on self-restraint and generosity, to be mindful of those less fortunate who may not always have food on the table, and to purify their bodies and minds.
The Islamic calendar is based on lunar cycles and the beginning of Eid al-Fitr is signaled by the first sighting of the new moon. During the day, families will celebrate with a special meal—the first they’ve had during daylight hours in a month.
Traditional foods made for Eid vary from country to country: Egyptians may enjoy a holiday treat of kahk—cookies filled with honey and nuts and covered in powdered sugar; Pakistanis shop for vermicelli to make a sweet pudding called seviyan; and Indonesian kitchens are cooking up ketupat—rice dumplings wrapped in palm leaves.
FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES COLLECTION OF EID-AL-FITR recipes
Moroccan Chickpeas With Chard
INGREDIENTS
4 tablespoons olive oil
2 Spanish onions, chopped
1 large jalapeño pepper, seeded if desired, chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
2 ½ teaspoons kosher salt, more to taste
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Pinch of cayenne
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 fennel bulb, diced (save fronds for garnish)
1 very large bunch chard, stems sliced 1/2-inch thick, leaves torn into bite-size pieces
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 large turnip, peeled and diced
1 pound dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in water to cover or quick-soaked (see note)
? cup diced dried apricots
2 tablespoons chopped preserved lemon, more to taste
½ cup chopped cilantro, more for garnish
PREPARATION
Heat oil in a large pot over high heat. Add onion and jalapeño and sauté until limp, 3 minutes. Add garlic, ginger, salt, turmeric, paprika, cinnamon, cumin, black pepper and cayenne and sauté until they release their fragrance, about 2 minutes. Add tomato paste and sauté for another minute, until darkened but not burned. (If tomato paste looks too dark too quickly, lower heat.)
Add fennel, chard stems, carrot and turnip and continue to sauté until vegetables start to soften, about 10 minutes. Add chickpeas and water to barely cover.
Return heat to high if you lowered it and bring to a simmer. Partly cover pot, lower heat to medium low, and simmer for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until chickpeas are softened. Add more water if needed (this should be like a stew).
Add chard leaves, apricots and preserved lemon to pot and continue simmering until chard is tender, about 5 minutes longer. Season with more salt if desired, and serve garnished with cilantro and reserved fennel fronds.

 
Jun
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News

PURSLANE

I was planning a major article on purslane. But then Dick Sandhaus (of the Better, Cheaper, Slower blog) sent me a killer recipe. And I found an article that covers every aspect of purslane better than I could hope to. I’m pasting the article and the link below; if you check out the link, you’ll find links to all the recipes mentioned. Dick Sandhaus’ recipe precedes the article.

http://chocolateandzucchini.com/ingredients-fine-foods/45-things-to-do-with-purslane/

FROM DICK SANDHAUS’ BETTER CHEAPER SLOWER BLOG—an ancient Greek salad

Andrakla Salad

I made two medium-size salads with:

1 cup of purslane

1 clove of garlic

1 cup of cherry tomatoes

1/2-cup of feta cheese, crumbled

2 teaspoons of olive oil

1 small wedge of lemon, juiced

3 sprigs of fresh oregano (optional)

1/2-cup of cucumber slices (optional)

Fry the purslane and garlic in 1 teaspoon of olive oil over low heat for 8 minutes. Stir in the optional oregano for 30 seconds, then remove the pan from heat. While your weeds are frying, slice the cherry tomatoes in half, crumble the feta and toss them with 1 teaspoon of olive oil and a squeeze of lemon.

Slice the optional cucumber if you want a traditional Greek diner touch. Toss the fried purslane with everything else and serve with or on the cucumber slices.

45 WAYS TO USE PURSLANE, from Zucchini and Chocolate blog

Have you ever cooked with purslane, or Portulaca oleracea as it is known to botanists? It is a succulent plant whose edible, delicious leaves are crunchy and slightly mucilaginous, with a tangy lemony and peppery flavor.

It is generally harvested from early June till the end of summer, and can either be foraged or purchased, usually from a farmers market or through a CSA share. The wild variety, which is actually considered a weed by many gardeners, is rampant and has pinkish stems (see picture above), while cultivated varieties tend to grow vertically and display greenish stems.

Purslane has been consumed since ancient times, and because it grows easily in hot and not too dry climates, it is represented in many cuisines of the world, from Greece to Mexico, and from Turkey to India by way of South Africa. (Here’s a handy list of its aliases in different languages.)

It is a bit of a nutritional powerhouse, offering remarkable amounts of minerals (most notably calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium), omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins (A, B, C), and antioxydants. It is thought to be an important component of the Cretan high-life-expectancy diet, and Michael Pollan has called it one of the two most nutritious plants on the planet in his In Defense of Food manifesto (the other is lamb’s quarters if you want to hunt for that too).

Although the stems are edible when still young (and can be pickled), cooks usually keep only the leaves and thin, spindly stems at the top, which are simply plucked from the central stem. The process is slow-going, but rewarding in the end. Because purslane grows so close to the earth, and especially if it is foraged*, it should be rinsed very well, in several baths of fresh water (I usually do three), with a bit of vinegar.

And once you have your bowlful of squeaky clean and vibrant little leaves, what do you do with them? Purslane is mostly eaten raw, but can also be cooked for a change of pace. I’ve gathered 45 purslane recipes for you — and hope you’ll add your own favorites in the comments section!

* Some people report that they find it growing from sidewalk cracks or in city parks, but I wouldn’t recommend foraging it from there.

Best Pairings for Purslane Recipes

– Purslane + cucumber

– Purslane + tomato

– Purslane + avocado

– Purslane + nuts (esp. almonds and walnuts)

– Purslane + garlic

– Purslane + lemon

– Purslane + vinegar

– Purslane + marjoram

– Purslane + chili pepper

– Purslane + eggs

– Purslane + cream

– Purslane + fresh cheese (esp. feta)

– Purslane + hard cheese (esp. parmesan)

– Purslane + fish

– Purslane + shellfish

– Purslane + duck

– Purslane + lamb

– Purslane + legumes (esp. black beans, lentils, and chickpeas)

– Purslane + stone fruits (esp. peaches, nectarines, and plums)

Purslane in salads

– Purslane salad with sesame oil, rice vinegar, gomasio, and strips of nori

– Purslane and potato salad with capers or anchovies

– Purslane salad with chunks of peaches and fresh goat cheese, or with a peach dressing

– Fattouche salad with toasted chips of pita bread

– Purslane salad with a white dressing (i.e. a classic vinaigrette with cream or buttermilk in place of oil)

– Purslane salad with black barley and watermelon

– Purslane salad with diced red bell peppers, lemon juice, and olive oil (the vitamin C in the bell peppers and lemon juice helps with the iron absorbency)

– Purslane salad with grilled corn and a creamy avocado dressing

– Purslane salad with walnuts, crispy bacon, and finely diced red onion

– Purslane salad with quinoa, peas, and radishes

– Purslane salad with diced tomatoes and cucumbers in a pomegranate molasses dressing

– Purslane salad with fregola sarda or Israeli couscous

– Purslane salad with chickpeas and a zaatar dressing

– Purslane salad with walnuts, sumac, and “grated” tomatoes

Purslane with meat

– Serve as a side salad with duck magret

– Stew with pork in a tomatillo sauce, Mexican-style (puerco con verdolagas)

– Stew with lamb and lentils

Purslane with fish

– Use purslane in a stuffing for baked fish

– Process purslane with a little cream or yogurt and make a green sauce to drizzle over fish

– Serve as a side salad with wild salmon, lobster, or crab

Purslane soups

– No-cook cucumber and purslane soup

– Portuguese purslane soup with potatoes

– Purslane and almond soup, adapted from this green bean and almond soup

Cooked purslane

– A Moroccan-style cooked salad

– Purslane spanakopita

– Purslane borek

– Sauté briefly (2-5 min) in olive oil

– Steam briefly (2-5 min) and dress with olive oil and lemon juice

– Make tempura with the tender tops

– Add to dal

Purslane in beverages

– Make green smoothies (purslane will make them creamier) with blueberries, kiwis, peaches, or tropical fruit (it’s okay to freeze purslane for use in smoothies)

– Make a cucumber and purslane slushie

– Make tea with the leaves; it is said to help ease headaches, bring down a fever, soothe sore throats, and combat inflammation.

Other purslane uses

– Pickled purslane

– Purslane vinegar

– Purslane pesto

– Purslane tzatziki (use purslane instead of, or in addition to the cucumber)

– Add to scrambled eggs and omelets

– Make green pancakes (recipe from my book!)

– Toss with pasta as in this pasta with tetragon

– Sprinkle over pizza just before serving

– Use as a garnish for gazpacho, chilled zucchini soup, or asparagus soup

– Add to sandwiches for crunch; it would be great in a lobster roll or  a BLT.

– Add to salsa and salsa verde


 
Jun
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News
GARLICSCAPES

Twenty years ago, when I first joined CSA, I threw away my garlicscapes. They didn’t fit anywhere in the refrigerator and sprang out every time I opened the door. I had no idea what to do with them. When I learned how to use them, I became a fan, as did many other members; scapes are now are an eagerly-awaited favorite.

I’ve included a list of “things to do with garlic scapes” but basically—just chop them up and use them like garlic. I find that they’re easier to use—no paper to peel—and give a milder, though still deep, garlic taste. A long scape goes a long way once it’s chopped and scapes last for a long time. Just roll them up and put them in the crisper drawer in a plastic bag to keep them all together. They can frozen, but I find that they last so long that I use them up before they go bad.

THINGS TO DO WITH GARLIC SCAPES

SCAPEY WHITE SAUCE

3 tablespoons butter

3 tablespoons chopped garlic scape (about 1 long scape)

3 tablespoons flour

3 cups milk, heated until almost—but not—boiling; 3 minutes in microwave

Salt, pepper to taste; grated nutmeg if you have it.

Melt the butter in a saucepan; add the garlicscape and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes. Add the flour and whisk until combine; it should be thick. Whisk for another two minutes. Then pour in the hot milk—carefully—and whisk stir until fully combined. Keep stirring until the sauce thickens, about 3-5 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, nutmeg and any other herbs. This is great with greens, turnips, potatoes, pasta.

GARLIC MAYONNAISE

Add a teaspoon to a tablespoon of finely chopped garlicscape to 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise, or mayonnaise/horseradish sauce combination. Makes a super sandwich spread.

SAUTED SCAPES

When we have a lot scapes—not this week—saute them, cut into manageable lengths—in butter and/or olive oil until they are browned and soft. I don’t think they work as a side dish on their own, but mixed with other broiled, roasted, or sautéed vegetables, they add a great taste. And layering a length of sautéed scape into a sandwich adds a wonderful texture and flavor.

GARLIC BREAD

Chop a scape into small pieces—or whirl it a food processor—and combine with soft butter; add some chopped herbs. Spread it on bread and warm the bread in the oven for a minute or two.

GARLIC SCAPE SOUP

From Super Natural Cooking, by Heidi Swanson

1 tablespoon clarified butter or extra-virgin olive oil

12 garlic scapes, flower buds discarded and green shoots chopped

2 medium russet potatoes, unpeeled and cut into ½ inch dice

2 to 3 cups vegetable stock or water

1 large handful spinach leaves (or other greens), stemmed

Juice of 1/4 lemon

1/4 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

2 tbs heavy cream (optional)

Heat the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat, then add the scapes and sauté for 2 minutes.

Add the potatoes and stock, cover, and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are cooked through and beginning to break down.

Remove from the heat, add the spinach, and puree using a hand blender. (If you must use a conventional blender, be careful; the hot liquid can burst out the top and make a huge, potentially painful mess. Try leaving the lid slightly ajar to allow steam to escape. Cover the top with a kitchen towel and blend in batches at low speed.)

Season with the lemon juice, salt, and a few grinds of pepper.

Whisk in the cream for a silkier texture.

If the soup tastes flat, add salt a few big pinches at a time until the flavors really pop.

Serves 2 to 3.

GARLICSCAPE PESTO

10 large garlic scapes

1/3 cup unsalted pistachios

1/3 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Kosher salt and black pepper

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Puree the garlic scapes, pistachios, Parmesan, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a food processor until very finely chopped. With the motor running, slowly pour the oil through the opening. Season the pesto with salt and pepper to taste. (The pesto keeps in the fridge, covered, for 1 week or frozen for a month.)

Serve over pasta; Serves 8-10

KATELYN’S GARLICSCAPE DIP

Katelyn writes:

I was in the Catskills over the holiday and I wanted to pass along this incredible garlic scape recipe that a friend gave me! We used it to spread on meat, but it would be an excellent dip, sandwich spread, or french fry sauce!

I believe she created this, so if you want to credit Susan Jaffe from Snowdance Farm, but I am not 90% certain, so either way is fine with me!

Creamy Garlic Scape Dip & Bread Spread

Ingredients

4-5 garlic scapes

2 tbs almonds

1 tbs sunflower seeds

1 tbs olive oil

2 tbs freshly grated parmesan cheese

salt and pepper

1/4 c Greek yogurt

~1-2 tbs sour cream and/or mayonnaise

Instructions

1. Wash the garlic scapes and cut off the ends so you are left with just the tender fragrant spirally part. Chop them into small pieces. (For a milder flavor, blanch your scapes first.)

2. Add everything to the food processor except Greek yogurt and sour cream/mayonnaise. Pulse until you have a pesto-like consistency.

3. Put the “pesto” into a small bowl and add the Greek yogurt. Take half of the mixture and put it back in the food processor. Puree until almost smooth. Add back into the small bowl.

4. Finally, mix in about 1-2 tbs sour cream or mayonnaise to taste.

*Serve as a dip with veggies or chips of your choice or as a garlic bread spread–it’s a perfect partner for kohlrabi


 
Jun
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News

KOHLRABI

We’re getting kohlrabi in our shares this week; it’s a lesser-known vegetable and one that looks like it  came from another planet. I find that its best role is as a crudite. Just peel, slice and then dip, dunk, or spread. It’s crisp, holds its shape, and doesn’t have a strong taste of its own. It can also be added to salads and slaws, sliced, chopped, or grated.  Any mashed potato dish can be enhanced with kohlrabi—it’s lower in calories and carbs than potatoes. And try the kohlrabi einbrenn recipe in Recipes from America’s Small Farms.

ROASTED: Toss with a little oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and herbs, and roast or broil; it’s great when roasted with other vegetables.

STEAMED: Slice and steam for a couple of minutes, over water or in a microwave. Then use in soups, frittatas, or spice it up and use as a side dish.

FRITTERS: Grate, mix with egg and breadcrumbs or flour; add salt, pepper, herbs, spices. Heat oil on a griddle, drop the batter in small mounds then flatten. Fry until crispy, then flip.

If you want more elaborate recipes, there is a bunch of them here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/15/kohlrabi-recipes_n_1597114.html

and one that combines kohlrabi with blueberries and fennel here:

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/kohlrabi-fennel-and-blueberry-salad:

More:

CRUNCHY RED DEVILS recipe by A. Doncsecz, Vegetarian Gourmet

2 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar

2 shallots, minced

1/4 cup hot red pepper sauce

1 teaspoon grainy mustard

½ teaspoon sugar

2 medium kohlrabi bulbs

Whisk together all ingredients except kohlrabi with ½ cup water. Peel and thinly slice kohlrabi; stir into marinade, coating evenly. Cover and refrigerate 2-3 days, stirring occasionally. Serve cold or at room temperature.

STIR-FRIED KOHLRABI from The Goodness of Potatoes and Root Vegetables by John Midgley

2 kohlrabi, peeled

2 medium carrots

3 tablespoons peanut or safflower oil

3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced

1 inch piece gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced

2 green onions, sliced

1 fresh chili pepper, sliced, optional

salt

3 tablespoons oyster sauce (optional)

2 teaspoons sesame oil & soy sauce, each

Slice kohlrabi and carrots into thin ovals. Heat oil in large heavy skillet; when it begins to smoke, toss in garlic and ginger. Stir once then add kohlrabi and carrots; toss and cook 2 minutes. Add green onions and chilies; stir-fry 1 minute, then pour in ½ cup water. Cover, reduce heat and cook 5 minutes. Remove cover and toss in a little salt and the sesame and soy, and oyster if using. Serve with rice.

ROASTED KOHLRABI WITH CRUNCHY SEEDS

Adapted from Perfect Vegetables by the Cook’s Illustrated Team

3 medium kohlrabi bulbs, peeled and cut into ¾ inch cubes

2 Tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons sesame seeds

1 teaspoon poppy seeds

½ teaspoon fennel seeds, coarsely chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Toss the kohlrabi, oil, seeds, and S & P together in a large bowl until combined. In a single layer spread the mixture onto a rimmed baking sheet. Roast (with rack in middle position), shaking pan occasionally, until the kohlrabi is browned and tender, about 30 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and adjust seasonings to taste, serve immediately.

Baked Kohlrabi Fries with Chili powder (serves about 2)

2 kohlrabi roots (stems and leaves removed, if they came with them attached – you can sautee those parts, if you want)

2 Tbs. melted coconut oil, ghee, or olive oil

salt

chili powder and ground cumin

Preheat your oven to 425F.  Wash the kohlrabi, then use a sharp paring knife or good vegetable peeler to peel them.  Cut them into matchsticks.

On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the kohlrabi sticks with the oil and sprinkle very generously with salt and chili powder, and sprinkle on a smaller amount of cumin.  Spread the kohlrabi in a single layer.

Bake in the oven, flipping once, until they are soft and getting blistered and dark on the outside, about 30 minutes.

Remove and eat warm with ketchup or with yogurt dipping sauce (see below).

Cilantro Lime Yogurt Sauce

1/2 cup plain yogurt (or sour cream)

1 Tbs. lime juice, plus a pinch of lime zest

2 Tbs. chopped fresh cilantro

salt and pepper to taste

Stir all ingredients together.  It’s that simple!

Baked Kohlrabi Fries with Chili powder (serves about 2)
2 kohlrabi roots (stems and leaves removed, if they came with them attached – you can sautee those parts, if you want)
2 Tbs. melted coconut oil, ghee, or olive oil
salt
chili powder and ground cumin
Preheat your oven to 425F.  Wash the kohlrabi, then use a sharp paring knife or good vegetable peeler to peel them.  Cut them into matchsticks.
On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the kohlrabi sticks with the oil and sprinkle very generously with salt and chili powder, and sprinkle on a smaller amount of cumin.  Spread the kohlrabi in a single layer.
Bake in the oven, flipping once, until they are soft and getting blistered and dark on the outside, about 30 minutes.
Remove and eat warm with ketchup or with yogurt dipping sauce (see below).
Cilantro Lime Yogurt Sauce
1/2 cup plain yogurt (or sour cream)
1 Tbs. lime juice, plus a pinch of lime zest
2 Tbs. chopped fresh cilantro
salt and pepper to taste
Stir all ingredients together.  It’s that simple!

 
Jun
19
    
Posted (Lori) in News

STORING

Most of the “hard” vegetables in our spring shares—kohlrabi, turnips, radishes—will last a few weeks in the vegetable crisper without any special attention. Cut off the greens and stems and use them separately within a few days. Wrap the bulbs loosely in plastic bags and keep them in the refrigerator.

Some people say that radishes stay crisper if they’re kept submersed in water; wash them, trim them, and place them in a container filled with water, then stored in the refrigerator.

FREEZING

HOW TO FREEZE ROOT VEGETABLES—this will work for turnips and kohlrabi. For radishes, don’t peel, and cut into discs instead of dice.

From: http://www.weedemandreap.com/freeze-root-vegetables-winter/

When it comes to preserving vegetables, there are a couple different ways to go about it. You can freeze them, can them, or dehydrate them. Some people have success with storing their root vegetables in a cool, dry place. This usually involves building a small root cellar.

While all of these methods are great, freezing your root vegetables is definitely the fastest method. It’s really simple. Here’s how to get started.

Step 1: You must first wash and peel your root vegetable.

Step 2: Dice your root vegetables into 1-inch cubes

Step 3: You need to bring a pot of water to a boil. The reason we’re doing this is because we’re going to blanch the root vegetables to prepare them for freezing. Don’t skip this step!

Blanching (scalding vegetables in boiling water or steam for a short time) is a must for almost all vegetables to be frozen. It stops enzyme actions which can cause loss of flavor, color and texture. Blanching cleanses the surface of dirt and organisms, brightens the color and helps retard loss of vitamins. It also wilts or softens vegetables and makes them easier to pack.

Blanching time is crucial and varies with the vegetable and size. Underblanching stimulates the activity of enzymes and is worse than no blanching. Overblanching causes loss of flavor, color, vitamins and minerals. Use one gallon water per pound of prepared vegetables. Put the vegetable in a blanching basket and lower into vigorously boiling water. Place a lid on the blancher. The water should return to boiling within 1 minute, or you are using too much vegetable for the amount of boiling water. Start counting blanching time as soon as the water returns to a boil. Keep heat high for the time given in the directions for the vegetable you are freezing.

Turnips, kohlrabi, and radishes should be blanched for 2 minutes.

Step 4: After blanching, remove from the boiling water and place them right into a bowl of ice water.

Step 5: After a few minutes in the ice water, transfer your root vegetables to a towel to dry.

Step 6: Lightly pat the root vegetables dry, then transfer to a freezer ready plastic bag or a vacuum packed bag.

That’s it! Now your root vegetables should be able to be stored in your freezer for up to 9 months in a regular freezer bag, and up to 14 months in a vacuum packed freezer bag!

TIP – To avoid rubbery root vegetables make sure to start with fresh root vegetables and be sure to not over cook them while blanching!

PICKLING

Pickled Turnips, from David Lebovits, http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2012/09/pickled-turnips-turnip-recipe/

(check out the link for more info)

You can dial down the amount of garlic, but I like the slightly aggressive flavor of the slices in the brine. Use whatever white salt is available where you are, but avoid fine table salt as it’s quite unpleasant and bitter. Gray salt will discolor the brine.

For those who like to tinker, although these are usually served as they are, a few sprigs of fresh dill, or dill flowers, in the brine will take them in a different direction. A hot pepper will add some zip.

3 cups (750 ml) water

1/3 cup (70 g) coarse white salt, such as kosher salt or sea salt

1 bay leaf

1 cup (250 ml) white vinegar (distilled)

2-pounds (1 kg) turnips, peeled

1 small beet, or a few slices from a regular-size beet, peeled

3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced

1. In a saucepan, heat about one-third of the water. Add the salt and bay leaf, stirring until the salt is dissolved.

2. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Once cool, add the vinegar and the rest of the water.

3. Cut the turnips and the beet into batons, about the size of French fries. Put the turnips, beets, and garlic slices into a large, clean jar, then pour the salted brine over them in the jar, including the bay leaf.

4. Cover and let sit at room temperature, in a relatively cool place, for one week. Once done, they can be refrigerated until ready to serve.

Storage: The pickles will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. They’ll be rather strong at first, but will mellow after a few days. They should be enjoyed within a six weeks after they’re made, as they tend to get less-interesting if they sit too long. If you are interested in canning, check here for tips on canning pickles.

PICKLED SHREDDED KOHLRABI

From Serious Eats, by Marissa McClellan

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/11/shredded-kohlrabi-quick-pickle-recipe.html

2 pounds kohlrabi

2 cups red wine vinegar

2 cups water

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons pickling salt

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1 garlic clove, grated

1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns

1/4 red chili flakes

1.

Wash and dry two quart jars. Set aside.

2.

Clean and trim kohlrabi bulbs. Using a mandoline slicer or a food processor, slice kohlrabi into thin sticks.

3.

Divide the shreds evenly between the two jars.

4.

Combine vinegar, water, honey, pickling salt, ginger, garlic, black peppercorns and red chili flakes in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil.

5.

Once brine is boiling vigorously, remove it from the heat and carefully pour the brine over the kohlrabi.

6.

Place lids on the jars and let them sit until cool.

7.

Once jars are cool to the touch, refrigerate the pickles and eat with salads, sandwiches or meat dishes.

Spicy Quick Pickled Radishes

Source: http://cookieandkate.com/2014/spicy-quick-pickled-radishes/

Super simple, spicy pickled radishes that are ready to eat immediately! These pickled radishes are amazing on tacos, burgers, salads and more. Recipe as listed below yields about 1¼ cup pickles.

1 bunch radishes

¾ cup white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar

¾ cup water

3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (this yields very spicy pickles, so use ½ teaspoon for medium spicy pickles or none at all)

½ teaspoon whole mustard seeds (optional)

Optional add-ins: garlic cloves, black peppercorns, fennel seeds, coriander seeds

1      Use a sharp chef’s knife or mandoline to slice the radishes into very thin rounds. Pack the rounds into a pint-sized canning jar. Top the rounds with red pepper flakes and mustard seeds.

2      To prepare the brine: In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, water, honey or maple syrup and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally, then pour the mixture over the radishes.

3      Let the mixture cool to room temperature. You can serve the pickles immediately or cover and refrigerate for later consumption. The pickles will keep well in the refrigerator for several weeks, although they are in their most fresh and crisp state for about 5 days after pickling.

NOTES

Recipe adapted from The First Mess and Bon Appetit.

MAKE IT VEGAN: Substitute maple syrup or agave nectar for the honey.

CHANGE IT UP: To the best of my knowledge, you can pickle any thinly sliced vegetables in this manner. Try carrot ribbons, cucumbers, red onions, cabbage and/or fennel! The thinner you slice the vegetables, the faster they absorb the vinegar solution and taste like pickles.