Dec
14
    
Posted (Lori) in News

FAQs

What is CSA?

Community Supported Agriculture is a relationship of support and commitment between a farm and a community. CSA members purchase shares of the farm’s entire growing season before the harvest begins. They then receive a share of the harvest throughout the season, grown and delivered by a farm they know and trust to a site in their neighborhood.

Payments from members enable the farm to cover yearly costs, almost all of which are incurred before the crops are ready for harvest. Because the farmers know that their crop is sold, they can concentrate on farming the best way they can rather than on marketing, sales, and accounting.

What is Stoneledge Farm?

Stoneledge Farm is a USDA-certified organic farm in South Cairo, NY about two hours north of the city. We’ve been working with farmers Deborah and Pete Kavakos for over 20 years; their son Peter and his wife Candice are now in the process of taking over. The Kavakoses grow more than 50 different crops and deliver to over 20 sites in New York City, Westchester, and Connecticut. To learn more about the farm, visit their website

www.stoneledge.farm

What is Yorkville CSA?

Yorkville CSA is a group of about 150 families and individuals that purchase shares in Stoneledge Farm; we’ve been doing it since 1998. Our group is 100% volunteer-run; no one is paid, though some of us receive all or part of shares for free.

The Stoneledge truck delivers vegetables to our site; volunteers help unload and arrange the vegetables on tables. We post signs that list what’s in the share and members pack their own shares.

We’re a laid-back group and there are not a lot of regulations. We generally follow the Golden Rule: Do onto other people’s vegetables as you would have them do onto yours. If you come at the right time, avoid squeezing the tomatoes, and keep your dogs away from the food, you’ll be fine. There are always experienced volunteers around to help and answer questions.

How much does it cost?

VEGETABLE SHARES come in three versions:

Full shares: $550 for 24 weeks ($535 if you buy before January 1)

Half shares: $305 for 24 weeks ($297.50 until January 1). We sell out of half shares very quickly; they’ve been sold out since January. Many members buy shares with friends and split each week; we provide a place to leave half the share for the second member of a split share to pick up a share that’s been packed by the first member.

Alternate week shares: $285 for 12 deliveries ($277.50 until January 1). Alternate seekers pick up full shares every other week. We’ll assign you to “odd” or “even” weeks.

Once you purchase a vegetable share, you can add optional shares:

FRUIT SHARES: 20 weeks of fruit—local, low-spray BUT NOT ORGANIC: $245

MUSHROOM SHARES: 24 weeks, mushrooms from a local farm: $130

COFFEE SHARES: 6 deliveries of fair-trade coffee, from Central America; $126

Where do we pick up?

Church of the Epiphany, corner of 74th and York; we set up outside the church garden on the 74th Street side. On rare occasions, we move to the York Avenue side and if it rains we go inside, in the church vestibule on 74th.  We’re not part of the church; they generously allow us to use their facility and store our supplies in their courtyard.

When do we pick up?

Official time is Tuesday, 4-7 pm. Our volunteers arrive at around 2:30 to set up tables, post signs, etc. The truck arrives at around 3 and we unload and organize the tables. We’re almost always ready by 3:30, sometimes earlier, and we’re happy to allow people to pick up as soon as the food is on the table—we use the 4 pm starting time in case the truck is delayed by traffic. The 7 pm closing time is strict; the church has to be locked by 7:15 and we have to get the site broken down by then. We do try to pack some extra shares for latecomers so that they can pick up until we leave.

When is the first week?

The first delivery is scheduled for June 7. A few weeks before the first delivery, we’ll email you and ask you to confirm that you know the opening date; if you don’t respond to the email, we’ll call you.

The season runs for 24 weeks and ends the week before Thanksgiving.

Are we required to help run the site?

No volunteering is required; we have a group of amazing volunteers, most of them grad students from Rockefeller, Cornell-Weil, and Sloan-Kettering. They’re smart, experienced, dedicated, and truly nice. They run the site so well that I usually feel superfluous. But if you want to volunteer—some of it is a lot of fun—there is always work to do. Let me know and we’ll set it up. There are also volunteer activities outside the site—writing recipe sheets, setting up farm trips and potlucks, informing members of the start date. If you want to be involved, we can use whatever time you can give us.

This year, we’re asking each member to contribute one or more recipes. A few of us have been compiling recipes sheets each week, but they’re getting old and we’re repeating ourselves. With 150 members, there are probably lots of great ideas out there. So even though I have no clue how to enforce it, we’re making a recipe contribution part of the deal.

What’s in a share?

There are usually 8-10 items in the share every week. We eat with the seasons; we don’t get tomatoes in June or broccoli in August, but the tomatoes of August and the broccoli of October are delicious. The farm website has a list of the crops they grow. Our website has lists of what was in the share each week in 2014.

How do we communicate?

We keep communication to a minimum, usually one email per month in the off-season, one per week during delivery season. Our weekly email during the season includes lists of what’s in the share, recipes and tips. We try to include some community information and news from members as well.

You will have phone numbers to call if you really need to, including a phone number for the farm. Remember, everyone in the city is a volunteer; and everyone at the farm is really busy.

When do we find out what’s in the share each week?

Our vegetables are harvested very close to the time they’re delivered. Even the farmers don’t know exactly what they’ll be picking until they pick it. Sometimes, a vegetable spurts up at the last minute; sometimes it slows down. We know it’s hard to plan without knowing what we’ll be getting though, so we try. On Sunday night or Monday morning, the farmers send a list to the site coordinators and we send them to members—but things still change. Sometimes an item will be taken off the list. More often, something is added.

What if I can’t make it one week? Can I send someone to take my share for me? Can I pick up extra the following week?

You can send anyone to pick up your share. Our security system is simple: if someone asks for your share and gives us your name, we let him/her have it. We’ve never had a problem. We’ll give you an info sheet for surrogate picker-uppers.

But no, we can’t promise to hold your share and you definitely can’t pick up extra the following week. Shares that are not picked up are donated to the church’s meal program or to a food pantry. Volunteers are allowed to take a bit extra. The farm can’t replace food that has already been sent and we can’t hold it. That said, on weeks when I’m at the site (I’m sometimes out of town), I usually take home an extra vegetable share; the first person who asks for it, gets it. And if you let me know by 3 pm, if I’m around, I will leave your share with my doorman for pickup later in the evening or the next morning—on a best-effort basis, no promises.

What if I don’t like or am allergic to something in the share? Can I take more of something else?

We do have a swap box; you can leave something you don’t want in the swap box and take something that someone else has left. But you can’t count on finding what you want. In some cases, you will just get one item less or take it for a friend. If you can’t use most of the vegetables that we get, this probably isn’t a good idea for you.

I can’t pick up my share until right before closing time. Will I get the dregs?

We don’t put all the vegetables out at the beginning of the evening; we keep some covered and replenish every half hour or so, so there is fresh stuff right up to the end. We do occasionally run out of an item. There’s usually extra of something else that’s acceptable as a replacement; if not, we replace with that item or something of equal value the next week.

But please remember: we are strict about closing time. If you arrive at 6:59:59, you’ll get your share—but you have to pick it very quickly or take a pre-packed bag. If you get there at 7:01, all bets are off. We have to lock the church by 7:15 at the latest and it takes time to break down in a way that lets us open properly the next week.

What are “CSA extras?”

We can order additional products in two ways:

Stoneledge Farm Marketplace offers local honey and maple syrup, fair trade coffee and chocolate, and bulk produce when available. Order by Friday of each week for delivery the following Tuesday. For more information:

www.stoneledge.farm (click on Marketplace; ordering will begin right before the first delivery)

Lewis Waite Farms: We can also order meat, dairy, grains, and other sustainably-raised products from a consortium of local farms. The products are delivered every second week to the site; you place your order the previous week.  For more info

www.csalewiswaitefarm.com

How many people does a full share feed?

That’s a very tricky question; it depends how hungry you are. I’m single and take a full share. I usually finish it before the weekend—but I cook for other people and I freeze/preserve some. There are families of five that take a half share and say they have too much.

How many members are in the group?

We sell about 100 full shares; some of these are divided into half shares, split shares, and alternate-week shares. There are about 150 separate families and individuals on our roster. We usually sell out months before the season starts and could sell many more shares–we’re limited by space in the truck.

What if bad weather or another disaster makes it impossible to deliver or harms the crop?

We all sign up with the knowledge that we are accepting the ups and downs of nature, along with the farmer. When nature cooperates (which is usually the case) crops are bountiful. Sometimes, bad weather harms a crop, but there are plenty of others that make up for it. On balance, most of us feel that we get a great deal—over 60% of our members return each year (many do not return because they leave the neighborhood). Over the past twenty years, there were two weeks when the farm could not deliver (once on 9/11/2001 and once right after Hurricane Sandy) and we lost several weeks of deliveries during Hurricane Irene. It’s important for members to know and understand this—even though the vast majority of the time, we get beautiful, delicious shares every week.

How do I sign up? Do I have to pay for it all at once?

Just go to the farm website and click on the “new members” button. You will be given prompts to set up an account and then to purchase shares. Once you’ve purchased a vegetable share, you will be able to add fruit, mushroom, and/or coffee shares—you can’t buy the extra shares without first buying a vegetable share. You can pay by credit, either all at once or in three installments. Or, you can click “pay by check” and mail a check to the farm.

By the way–I’m Lori Stein. I’ve been volunteer site coordinator for the past four years; I was also site coordinator for the first five years when she started. I hope to meet you on June 7.

Lori


 
Dec
14
    
Posted (Lori) in News
1. Finish and post share lists
2. Finish and post FAQs
3. Write to Candice
4. Finish contact list
5. Write contact letter
WEEK 1
1 Head- Mirlo Butter Crunch Lettuce
1 Head- Panisse Oak Leaf Lettuce
2 Heads- Boc Choi
1 Bunch- Rhubarb
1 Head- Red Tide Lettuce
1 Head- Chinese Cabbage
1 Bunch- Cherriette Radishes
1 Head- Tropicana Lettuce
1 Green Genovese Basil Transplant.  (You can eat now)
Optional Shares:
Mushrooms- Crimini
WEEK 2
1 Head- Romaine Lettuce
1 Head- Green Butter Crunch Lettuce
1 Bunch- Arugula
1 Bunch- Mizuna
1 Head- Red Butter Crunch Lettuce
1 Head- Tropicana Lettuce
1 Bunch-Radish
1 Bunch- Spinach
1 Rosemany Transplant
Optional Shares:
Mushrooms- Oyster
WEEK 3
1 Head- Romaine Lettuce
1 Head- Red Leaf Lettuce
1 Bunch- Purple Kohlrabi
4- Garlic Scapes
1 Head- Green Leaf Lettuce
1 Bunch- Mustard Greens
1 Bunch- Arugula
1 Bunch- Swiss Chard
1 Bunch- Purslane
1 Basket-Sugar Snap Peas
1 Head- Romaine Lettuce
1 Head- Red Leaf Lettuce
1 Bunch- Purple Kohlrabi
4- Garlic Scapes
1 Head- Green Leaf Lettuce
1 Bunch- Mustard Greens
1 Bunch- Arugula
1 Bunch- Swiss Chard
1 Bunch- Purslane
Optional Shares:
Mushrooms- White Button
WEEK 4
4 Garlic Scapes
1 Head Red Oak Leaf Lettuce
1 Bunch Mustard Greens
1 Head Red Buttercrunch Lettuce
1 Bunch Green Swiss Chard
1 Bunch Green Kohlrabi
1 Bunch Mizuna
1 Bunch Red Ace Beets
1 Basket Sugar Snap Peas
1 Head Frisee
1 Bunch Lacinato Kale (AKA Dinosaur Kale)
WEEK 5
1 Bunch- Red Ace Beets
Purple Top White Globe Turnips
1 Head- Red Butter Head Lettuce
1 Head- Red Oak Lettuce
7- Garlic Scapes
1 Bunch- White Scallions
1 Head- Frissee
1 Head- Napa Cabbage
1 Bunch- Summer Savory (herb)
Mixed Summer Squash (quantity to come)
Optional shares
MUSHROOM SHARE: Portobellos
FRUIT SHARE: 1 Basket- White Sweet Cherries
-1 Basket- Red Sweet Cherries
-1 Basket- Strawberries
WEEK 6
Cucumber
1 bunch-Mint
Eggplant
1 bunch-Red Scallions
Fennel
1 bunch- Swiss Chard
1 head- Escarole
1 head- Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage (Heirloom)  Specialty Arrow Shared Cabbage
Summer Squash
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: White Button
Fruit Share:
1 basket- Red Sweet Cherries
1 basket- Blueberries
WEEK 7
Summer Squash
Eggplant
1 head- Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage (Heirloom)  Specialty Arrow Shared Cabbage
1- Head Red Oak Leaf Lettuce
1- Head Green Oak Leaf Lettuce
1- Bunch White Scallions
1- Bunch Thyme
Cucumbers
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: Portobello
Fruit Share: 1- Basket Red Sweet Cherries; 1-Blueberries
WEEK 8
Summer Squash
Eggplant
1 basket- Cherry Tomatoes
1 bunch-Basil
1 bunch- Spinach
Lettuce
1 bunch- Red Ace Beets
Cucumbers
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share:  OYSTERS
Fruit Share: Grown by Klein’s Kill Fruit Farm
1 basket -Yellow Shiro Plums
1 bag- White Nectarines
1 bag- Yellow Peaches
WEEK 9
1 bunch- Celery
Cucumber
Sweet Pepper
Tomatoes
Eggplant
1 bunch- White Onions
1 bunch- Amethyst Basil
Lettuce
Optional Shares:
Mushroom Share: Shiitake
Fruit Share:
1- Bag Shiro Plums
1- Bag Peaches
1- Bag Nectarines
WEEK 10
1 bunch- Red Onion
1 bunch- Rosemary
1- Black Bell Eggplant
3- Fennel
2- Sunkist Slicing Tomatoes
1 basket- Sungold Cherry Tomatoes
4- Sweet Bell Peppers
1 bunch-Starbor Kale
3- Plum Tomatoes
1 LB. – Green Beans
Optional Shares:
Mushroom Share: Oyster
Fruit Share:
1- Bag Yellow Peaches
1- Bag Donut Peaches
WEEK 11
2- Sunkist Tomatoes
1 basket- Cherry Tomatoes
1 bunch- Celery
1 bunch- Parsley
2-Sweet Peppers
1 buch- Leeks
2 lbs. Potatoes
1 bunch- Rainbow Carrots
1 head- Broccoli
1 bunch- Green Basil
2- Red Slicing Tomatoes
Optional Shares:
Mushroom Share”Crimini
Fruit Share:
1 Bag- Donut Peaches
1 Bag- Yellow Peaches
WEEK 12
4 – Plum Tomatoes
1 basket- Cherry Tomatoes
1 bunch- Cilantro
Sweet Peppers
Eggplant
2- Garlic
1 bunch- Lacinato Kale
1 Lb. – Tomatillos
2- Jalapeño Pepper (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)
1- Fennel
Optional Shares:
Mushroom Share: Portobello
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Yellow Nectarines
1 bag- Peaches
WEEK 13
2 Sunkist Tomatoes
2 Hot Peppers (EXTREMELY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)
2 Sweet Bell Peppers
1 White Bell Eggplant
1 bunch Swiss Chard
1 bunch Edamame Beans
1 bunch Gold Beets (Use the Greens!)
2 Red Onions
1 bunch Cilantro
2 Red Slicing Tomatoes
Optional Shares:
Mushroom Share: Jumbo Shiitake
Fruit Share:
1 bag White Donut Peaches
1 bag Green Clapp Pears
WEEK 14
1 lb.- Green Beans
1 bunch- Dill
2 lbs.- Potaotes
2 – Red Onions
15  Tomatillos
1 – White Eggplant
2- Sweet Bell Peppers
1 bunch- Collard Greens
2 – Serrano Peppers (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)
3- Sunkist Tomatoes
1- Red Slicing Tomato
Optional Shares:
Mushroom Share: Portobello
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Long John Plums
1 bag- Zestar Apples
WEEK 15
1 head  Celery
1 bunch  Vermont Cranberry Beans (Heirloom Variety)
1 bunch Carrots
2 Shallots
1 bunch Red Russian Kale
1 bunch Red Ace Beets
Sweet Peppers
Tomatoes
Hot Peppers
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: Crimini
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Gala Apples
1 bag- Bartlett Pears
WEEK 16
Butternut Winter Squash- 1
1 bunch- Spinach
1 bunch- Leeks
1 Lb.- Purple Carrots
1 bunch- Mint
2 lbs.- White Potatoes
1- Celeriac
2-Ancho Peppers (Mild Hot Pepper)
1 head- Romanesco Cauliflower
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: Oyster
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Prune Plums
1 bag- Fuji Apples
WEEK 17
Broccoli
1 bunch- Lacinato Kale
2- Jalapeño Peppers (VERY HOT use with CAUTION)
1 bunch- Swiss Chard
1 bunch- Chioggia Beets
1 bunch- Scallions
1 bunch- Specialty Radish
1 bunch- Sage
Will Send Update
Optional Shares this week
Mushroom Share
White Button
Fruit Share: (Grown by Tousey Farm & Fix Brother Orchard)
1 basket- of Concord Grapes
1 bag – Seckel Pears & Cortland Apples
WEEK 18
2- Broccoli
1 bunch- Bella Luna White Turnips
1 lb. – Carrots
1 bunch- Collard Greens
2- White Onions
1 bunch- Mizuna
1 bunch- Red Mustard
1 bunch- French Breakfast Radishes
2- Jalapeño Hot Peppers (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)
1 bunch- Arugula
Optional shares
Mushroom Share: Shiitake
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Empire Apples and Bartlett Pears
WEEK 19
1-Celeriac
2- Sweet Potatoes
1 bunch- Curly Kale
1 bunch- Red Ace Beets
4 – Shallots
1 bunch- Cherry Radishes
1 bunch- Arugula
1 bunch- Mizuna
1 bunch- Mustard Greens
1 – Butternut Winter Squash
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share:  Crimini
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Anjou Pears and Golden Delicious Apples
WEEK 20
2lbs. – Potaotes
1 lb. – Carrots
1 head – Cauliflower
1 bunch – Bella Luna White Turnips
2 – Garlic
1 bunch – Lacinato Kale
1 head – Bok Choy
1 bunch – Radishes
2 – Ancho Peppers (Mildly Hot)
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: Portobello
Fruit Share:
1 bag – Bosc Pears & Mutsu Apples
WEEK 21
4- Shallots
2- Garlic
Sweet Potatoes
1lb.- Carrots
1 bunch- Lacinato Kale
1 head- Lettuce
1 bunch- Arugula
1 bunch- Mustard Greens
1 bunch- Radishes
1 bunch- Mizuna
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: White Button
Fruit Share:
1 bag – Winesap Stayman Apples & Bosc Pears
WEEK 22
Kohlrabi
1 bunch- Red Russian Kale
1 bunch- Collard Greens
2 lbs. – Potatoes
1- Diakon Radish
1 lb. – Carrots
4- Shallots
2- Pop Corn
2- Onions
Beets
Winter Squash
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: Shiitake
Fruit Share:
1- Bag Jonagold Apples and Bosc Pears
WEEK 23
1- Celeriac
Lettuce
1 bunch- Italian Parsley
2- White Onions
2 Lbs- Potatoes
1 Lb.- Carrots
1 bunch- Lacinato Kale
Purple Globe Turnips
1 stalk- Brussels Sprouts
1 head- Cabbage
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: White Button
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Evercrisp Apples & Bosc Pears
WEEK 24
1-Celeriac
4 – Garlic
1 stalk – Brussels Sprouts
1 bunch – Sage
2 – Onions
2 lbs. – Potatoes
1 lb. – Carrots
1 bunch- Kale
2-Pop Corn
1 bunch- Collard Greens
1- Delicata Winter Squash
Optional Shares
Mushroom Share: Shiitake
Fruit Share:
1 bag- Fuji, G1. Finish and post share lists

Here are lists of what we received each week in the 2017 season. These lists are the ones sent by the farmers a few days before delivery; there were sometimes slight changes. In a few cases, items were dropped from the list, but on most weeks, something was added.

WEEK 1

1 Head- Mirlo Butter Crunch Lettuce

1 Head- Panisse Oak Leaf Lettuce

2 Heads- Boc Choi

1 Bunch- Rhubarb

1 Head- Red Tide Lettuce

1 Head- Chinese Cabbage

1 Bunch- Cherriette Radishes

1 Head- Tropicana Lettuce

1 Green Genovese Basil Transplant.  (You can eat now)

Optional Shares:

Mushrooms- Crimini

WEEK 2

1 Head- Romaine Lettuce

1 Head- Green Butter Crunch Lettuce

1 Bunch- Arugula

1 Bunch- Mizuna

1 Head- Red Butter Crunch Lettuce

1 Head- Tropicana Lettuce

1 Bunch-Radish

1 Bunch- Spinach

1 Rosemany Transplant

Optional Shares:

Mushrooms- Oyster

WEEK 3

1 Head- Romaine Lettuce

1 Head- Red Leaf Lettuce

1 Bunch- Purple Kohlrabi

4- Garlic Scapes

1 Head- Green Leaf Lettuce

1 Bunch- Mustard Greens

1 Bunch- Arugula

1 Bunch- Swiss Chard

1 Bunch- Purslane

1 Basket-Sugar Snap Peas

1 Head- Romaine Lettuce

1 Head- Red Leaf Lettuce

1 Bunch- Purple Kohlrabi

4- Garlic Scapes

1 Head- Green Leaf Lettuce

1 Bunch- Mustard Greens

1 Bunch- Arugula

1 Bunch- Swiss Chard

1 Bunch- Purslane

Optional Shares:

Mushrooms- White Button

WEEK 4

4 Garlic Scapes

1 Head Red Oak Leaf Lettuce

1 Bunch Mustard Greens

1 Head Red Buttercrunch Lettuce

1 Bunch Green Swiss Chard

1 Bunch Green Kohlrabi

1 Bunch Mizuna

1 Bunch Red Ace Beets

1 Basket Sugar Snap Peas

1 Head Frisee

1 Bunch Lacinato Kale (AKA Dinosaur Kale)

WEEK 5

1 Bunch- Red Ace Beets

Purple Top White Globe Turnips

1 Head- Red Butter Head Lettuce

1 Head- Red Oak Lettuce

7- Garlic Scapes

1 Bunch- White Scallions

1 Head- Frissee

1 Head- Napa Cabbage

1 Bunch- Summer Savory (herb)

Mixed Summer Squash (quantity to come)

Optional shares

MUSHROOM SHARE: Portobellos

FRUIT SHARE: 1 Basket- White Sweet Cherries

-1 Basket- Red Sweet Cherries

-1 Basket- Strawberries

WEEK 6

Cucumber

1 bunch-Mint

Eggplant

1 bunch-Red Scallions

Fennel

1 bunch- Swiss Chard

1 head- Escarole

1 head- Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage (Heirloom)  Specialty Arrow Shared Cabbage

Summer Squash

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: White Button

Fruit Share:

1 basket- Red Sweet Cherries

1 basket- Blueberries

WEEK 7

Summer Squash

Eggplant

1 head- Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage (Heirloom)  Specialty Arrow Shared Cabbage

1- Head Red Oak Leaf Lettuce

1- Head Green Oak Leaf Lettuce

1- Bunch White Scallions

1- Bunch Thyme

Cucumbers

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: Portobello

Fruit Share: 1- Basket Red Sweet Cherries; 1-Blueberries

WEEK 8

Summer Squash

Eggplant

1 basket- Cherry Tomatoes

1 bunch-Basil

1 bunch- Spinach

Lettuce

1 bunch- Red Ace Beets

Cucumbers

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share:  OYSTERS

Fruit Share: Grown by Klein’s Kill Fruit Farm

1 basket -Yellow Shiro Plums

1 bag- White Nectarines

1 bag- Yellow Peaches

WEEK 9

1 bunch- Celery

Cucumber

Sweet Pepper

Tomatoes

Eggplant

1 bunch- White Onions

1 bunch- Amethyst Basil

Lettuce

Optional Shares:

Mushroom Share: Shiitake

Fruit Share:

1- Bag Shiro Plums

1- Bag Peaches

1- Bag Nectarines

WEEK 10

1 bunch- Red Onion

1 bunch- Rosemary

1- Black Bell Eggplant

3- Fennel

2- Sunkist Slicing Tomatoes

1 basket- Sungold Cherry Tomatoes

4- Sweet Bell Peppers

1 bunch-Starbor Kale

3- Plum Tomatoes

1 LB. – Green Beans

Optional Shares:

Mushroom Share: Oyster

Fruit Share:

1- Bag Yellow Peaches

1- Bag Donut Peaches

WEEK 11

2- Sunkist Tomatoes

1 basket- Cherry Tomatoes

1 bunch- Celery

1 bunch- Parsley

2-Sweet Peppers

1 buch- Leeks

2 lbs. Potatoes

1 bunch- Rainbow Carrots

1 head- Broccoli

1 bunch- Green Basil

2- Red Slicing Tomatoes

Optional Shares:

Mushroom Share”Crimini

Fruit Share:

1 Bag- Donut Peaches

1 Bag- Yellow Peaches

WEEK 12

4 – Plum Tomatoes

1 basket- Cherry Tomatoes

1 bunch- Cilantro

Sweet Peppers

Eggplant

2- Garlic

1 bunch- Lacinato Kale

1 Lb. – Tomatillos

2- Jalapeño Pepper (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)

1- Fennel

Optional Shares:

Mushroom Share: Portobello

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Yellow Nectarines

1 bag- Peaches

WEEK 13

2 Sunkist Tomatoes

2 Hot Peppers (EXTREMELY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)

2 Sweet Bell Peppers

1 White Bell Eggplant

1 bunch Swiss Chard

1 bunch Edamame Beans

1 bunch Gold Beets (Use the Greens!)

2 Red Onions

1 bunch Cilantro

2 Red Slicing Tomatoes

Optional Shares:

Mushroom Share: Jumbo Shiitake

Fruit Share:

1 bag White Donut Peaches

1 bag Green Clapp Pears

WEEK 14

1 lb.- Green Beans

1 bunch- Dill

2 lbs.- Potaotes

2 – Red Onions

15  Tomatillos

1 – White Eggplant

2- Sweet Bell Peppers

1 bunch- Collard Greens

2 – Serrano Peppers (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)

3- Sunkist Tomatoes

1- Red Slicing Tomato

Optional Shares:

Mushroom Share: Portobello

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Long John Plums

1 bag- Zestar Apples

WEEK 15

1 head  Celery

1 bunch  Vermont Cranberry Beans (Heirloom Variety)

1 bunch Carrots

2 Shallots

1 bunch Red Russian Kale

1 bunch Red Ace Beets

Sweet Peppers

Tomatoes

Hot Peppers

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: Crimini

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Gala Apples

1 bag- Bartlett Pears

WEEK 16

Butternut Winter Squash- 1

1 bunch- Spinach

1 bunch- Leeks

1 Lb.- Purple Carrots

1 bunch- Mint

2 lbs.- White Potatoes

1- Celeriac

2-Ancho Peppers (Mild Hot Pepper)

1 head- Romanesco Cauliflower

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: Oyster

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Prune Plums

1 bag- Fuji Apples

WEEK 17

Broccoli

1 bunch- Lacinato Kale

2- Jalapeño Peppers (VERY HOT use with CAUTION)

1 bunch- Swiss Chard

1 bunch- Chioggia Beets

1 bunch- Scallions

1 bunch- Specialty Radish

1 bunch- Sage

Will Send Update

Optional Shares this week

Mushroom Share

White Button

Fruit Share: (Grown by Tousey Farm & Fix Brother Orchard)

1 basket- of Concord Grapes

1 bag – Seckel Pears & Cortland Apples

WEEK 18

2- Broccoli

1 bunch- Bella Luna White Turnips

1 lb. – Carrots

1 bunch- Collard Greens

2- White Onions

1 bunch- Mizuna

1 bunch- Red Mustard

1 bunch- French Breakfast Radishes

2- Jalapeño Hot Peppers (VERY HOT USE WITH CAUTION)

1 bunch- Arugula

Optional shares

Mushroom Share: Shiitake

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Empire Apples and Bartlett Pears

WEEK 19

1-Celeriac

2- Sweet Potatoes

1 bunch- Curly Kale

1 bunch- Red Ace Beets

4 – Shallots

1 bunch- Cherry Radishes

1 bunch- Arugula

1 bunch- Mizuna

1 bunch- Mustard Greens

1 – Butternut Winter Squash

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share:  Crimini

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Anjou Pears and Golden Delicious Apples

WEEK 20

2lbs. – Potaotes

1 lb. – Carrots

1 head – Cauliflower

1 bunch – Bella Luna White Turnips

2 – Garlic

1 bunch – Lacinato Kale

1 head – Bok Choy

1 bunch – Radishes

2 – Ancho Peppers (Mildly Hot)

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: Portobello

Fruit Share:

1 bag – Bosc Pears & Mutsu Apples

WEEK 21

4- Shallots

2- Garlic

Sweet Potatoes

1lb.- Carrots

1 bunch- Lacinato Kale

1 head- Lettuce

1 bunch- Arugula

1 bunch- Mustard Greens

1 bunch- Radishes

1 bunch- Mizuna

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: White Button

Fruit Share:

1 bag – Winesap Stayman Apples & Bosc Pears

WEEK 22

Kohlrabi

1 bunch- Red Russian Kale

1 bunch- Collard Greens

2 lbs. – Potatoes

1- Diakon Radish

1 lb. – Carrots

4- Shallots

2- Pop Corn

2- Onions

Beets

Winter Squash

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: Shiitake

Fruit Share:

1- Bag Jonagold Apples and Bosc Pears

WEEK 23

1- Celeriac

Lettuce

1 bunch- Italian Parsley

2- White Onions

2 Lbs- Potatoes

1 Lb.- Carrots

1 bunch- Lacinato Kale

Purple Globe Turnips

1 stalk- Brussels Sprouts

1 head- Cabbage

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: White Button

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Evercrisp Apples & Bosc Pears

WEEK 24

1-Celeriac

4 – Garlic

1 stalk – Brussels Sprouts

1 bunch – Sage

2 – Onions

2 lbs. – Potatoes

1 lb. – Carrots

1 bunch- Kale

2-Pop Corn

1 bunch- Collard Greens

1- Delicata Winter Squash

Optional Shares

Mushroom Share: Shiitake

Fruit Share:

1 bag- Fuji, Golden Delicious Apples and Bosc Pears

olden Delicious Apples and Bosc Pears

 
Nov
13
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Cabbage and Apple Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing
Sometimes nothing else will satisfy me but a fresh, raw, crunchy and delicious salad. But, at the end of winter and in the beginning of spring there’s not too much produce being harvested.
The ground, in most places, is still hard as a rock, and the new spring sprouts have yet to burst up and start growing.
That means, it’s a great time of year to enjoy the hardy wintry-type foods that are still abundantly available, but prepare them in a much lighter way.
As a salad!
I’m using Chinese cabbage in this recipe, but you can use any type. There are so many to choose from. Purple cabbage, for example, would make this dish really stand out with a burst of bright color if you’re craving some eye candy.
Cabbage has a mildly sweet flavor and is rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), choline, beta carotene, folate, and fiber. It also contains sulphur compounds that help with digestive health, liver health and bodily detoxification.
So, if you’re craving a crunchy and delicious salad like I am, get yourself a beautiful head of cabbage and start chopping! Your whole body will thank you for it.
Cabbage and Apple Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing
Print
Prep time
10 mins
Total time
10 mins
Author: Andrea Beaman
Recipe type: Salad
Cuisine: Healthy and Delcious
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
½ head Chinese cabbage (or other cabbage)
1 apple, seeded and sliced into thick matchsticks
¼ cup parsley, chopped
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. ginger juice
2 tsp. raw local honey
¼ tsp. sea salt
¼ cup crushed roasted almonds
Instructions
Shred the cabbage or slice it thin
Place into a large mixing bowl
Add apple and parsley
Whisk the oil, vinegar, ginger juice, honey and salt
Pour over the sale and toss to coat
Garnish with crushed toasted almonds

CREAMY CAULIFLOWER PUREE WITH TOASTED SESAME SEEDS

Author: Andrea Beaman

Prep time: 15 mins Cook time: 35 mins Total time: 50 mins

Serves: 4 servings

Ingredients

1 small head Romanesco broccoli florets, plus ¼ cup cauliflower florets

Olive oil

Black pepper

1 large head cauliflower (or 4 cups of florets)

4-5 large garlic cloves, peeled

2 & ½ cups vegetable stock (water or milk of your choice)

3-4 tbsp. grass-fed butter

1 tsp. sea salt

1 tbsp. fennel seeds

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375.

Chop romanesco and ¼ cup cauliflower into small florets.

Put florets into a mixing bowl and lightly coat with olive oil, sea salt and black pepper.

Place onto a baking tray and bake 30-35 minutes.

While romanesco and florets are baking, bring remaining cauliflower (4 cups), garlic, stock, butter and 1 tsp. sea salt to a boil in a soup pot.

Reduce heat to simmer, cover and cook 15 minutes.

Pour soup ingredients into a food processor or Vitamix.

Puree until smooth and creamy.

Ladle puree into a soup bowl and top with roasted romanesco and cauliflower florets.

In a small frying pan, lightly toast fennel seeds on a low heat for 5-7 minutes (or until lightly toasted and fragrant).

Top with toasted fennel seeds.

CINNAMON AND NUTMEG SPICED SQUASH SOUP

As the season’s shift and the weather cools, it’s a wise idea to incorporate more warming and nourishing foods into your diet.

Winter squash is definitely one of those prized ingredients that I love during the fall and winter months. It is not only warming, sweet and delicious, it contains quite a few carotenoids that support good health: alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin.[1]

According to studies, dietary carotenoids provide health benefits by decreasing the risk of disease, particularly certain cancers and eye disease.  “The carotenoids that have been most studied in this regard are beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. In part, the beneficial effects of carotenoids are thought to be due to their role as antioxidants. Beta-Carotene may have added benefits due its ability to be converted to vitamin A. Furthermore, lutein and zeaxanthin may be protective in eye disease because they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye.”[2]

But, besides the scientific mumbo jumbo, squash has a sweet flavor that helps support the stomach/spleen/pancreas. This is the system in the body that thrives on the naturally sweet flavor of good starches and carbohydrates.

I’ve also included some savory and warming spices into this recipe. Both cinnamon and nutmeg bring heat into the digestive system, helping you digest your food better.

Try it yourself and see how you feel. I bet on a cold blustery day, your body will thank you for this delicious meal.

2-3 tbsp. grass-fed butter

1 onion, peeled and diced

4-5 cups butternut squash, peeled and cubed (1 large butternut squash)

1 & 1/2 tsp. Real sea salt

2-3 inches, ginger peeled and chopped

1 tsp. organic ground nutmeg

1 tsp. ground cinnamon

4 cups duck stock, water, veggie stock or milk

In a soup pot on medium high heat, saute onion and squash in butter for 3-4 minutes. Add sea salt, ginger, nutmeg and cinnamon. Add stock and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to simmer for 15 minutes. Put all ingredients into a food processor or blender and puree. Add soup back to the pot and season with more salt if needed. Enjoy!

Cabbage and Apple Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing

Sometimes nothing else will satisfy me but a fresh, raw, crunchy and delicious salad. But, at the end of winter and in the beginning of spring there’s not too much produce being harvested.

The ground, in most places, is still hard as a rock, and the new spring sprouts have yet to burst up and start growing.

That means, it’s a great time of year to enjoy the hardy wintry-type foods that are still abundantly available, but prepare them in a much lighter way.

As a salad!

I’m using Chinese cabbage in this recipe, but you can use any type. There are so many to choose from. Purple cabbage, for example, would make this dish really stand out with a burst of bright color if you’re craving some eye candy.

Cabbage has a mildly sweet flavor and is rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), choline, beta carotene, folate, and fiber. It also contains sulphur compounds that help with digestive health, liver health and bodily detoxification.

So, if you’re craving a crunchy and delicious salad like I am, get yourself a beautiful head of cabbage and start chopping! Your whole body will thank you for it.

CABBAGE AND APPLE SALAD WITH HONEY GINGER DRESSING

Prep time: 10 mins Total time: 10 mins

Author: Andrea Beaman

Recipe type: Salad

Serves: 4 servings

Ingredients

½ head Chinese cabbage (or other cabbage)

1 apple, seeded and sliced into thick matchsticks

¼ cup parsley, chopped

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar

1 tsp. ginger juice

2 tsp. raw local honey

¼ tsp. sea salt

¼ cup crushed roasted almonds

Instructions

Shred the cabbage or slice it thin

Place into a large mixing bowl

Add apple and parsley

Whisk the oil, vinegar, ginger juice, honey and salt

Pour over the sale and toss to coat

Garnish with crushed toasted almonds


 
Nov
13
    
Posted (Lori) in News

ALL ARE FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

SMASHED CARROTS WITH FETA AND MINT

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 pounds large carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks

Salt and pepper

2 cloves garlic, minced

6 ounces feta cheese, crumbled

2 tablespoons freshly chopped mint leaves

Pinch of crushed red pepper (optional)

In a large, heavy pot with a lid, warm olive oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add carrots and stir to coat. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Add garlic, stir, and let sizzle just until golden; do not let it brown. Then add 1 cup water and cover pot.

Reduce heat to low, and simmer until tender, about 10 minutes. Remove lid, and turn heat to high. Simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated.

With a potato masher, crush carrots roughly, right in the pot, leaving mixture a bit chunky. Set aside until ready to serve.

To serve, reheat carrots over low heat. Fold most of the feta and mint into the hot carrot mixture, reserving enough for garnish. Transfer to a serving dish. Sprinkle with crushed red pepper, if using. Top with remaining feta and mint.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CHORIZO

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

8 ounces fresh, soft Spanish chorizo, chopped in 1/2-inch pieces

1 ½ pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed and sliced 1/4-inch thick

Salt and pepper

3 garlic cloves, minced

½ teaspoon pimentón (Spanish smoked paprika), picante (hot) or dulce (sweet)

2 tablespoons roughly chopped parsley

In a wide skillet, warm olive oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add chorizo and let sizzle for a minute or so, until it releases some of its fat.

Mash chorizo with a wooden spoon, encouraging it to crumble. Cook, stirring, until slightly browned, about 2 minutes more. Use a slotted spoon to remove chorizo and set aside. Leave oil bubbling in skillet.

Add brussels sprouts to the skillet, and season generously with salt and pepper. Raise heat to high and cook, stirring, until sprouts are tender and lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Reduce heat if needed to prevent scorching.

Add garlic and pimentón and stir to coat. Return chorizo to pan and cook, stirring, 2 minutes more. Sprinkle with parsley and transfer to a serving dish. Serve hot.

SPICY STIR-FRIED CABBAGE

4 garlic cloves, minced

2 teaspoons minced ginger

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 star anise, broken in half

2 teaspoons soy sauce (more to taste)

2 tablespoons Shao Hsing rice wine or dry sherry

2 tablespoons peanut or canola oil

1 small cabbage, 1 to 1 1/2 pounds, quartered, cored and cut crosswise into 1/8-inch shreds

1 medium carrot, cut into julienne

Salt to taste

2 tablespoons minced chives, Chinese chives or cilantro

Combine the garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes and star anise in a small bowl. Combine the soy sauce and wine or sherry in another small bowl.

Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or a 12-inch skillet over high heat until a drop of water evaporates within a second or two when added to the pan. Swirl in the oil by adding it to the sides of the pan and tilting it back and forth. Add the garlic, ginger, pepper flakes and star anise. Stir-fry for a few seconds, just until fragrant, then add the cabbage and carrots. Stir-fry for one to two minutes until the cabbage begins to wilt, then add the salt and wine/soy sauce mixture. Cover and cook over high heat for one minute until just wilted. Uncover and stir-fry for another 30 seconds, then stir in the chives or cilantro and remove from the heat. The cabbage should be crisp-tender. Serve with rice or noodles.

CARAMELIZED TURNIPS WITH CAPERS, LEMON AND PARSLEY

3 pounds small turnips or daikon radish

3 tablespoons olive oil

Salt

pepper

2 small garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and roughly chopped

Zest of 1/2 lemon

3 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Juice of 1/2 lemon, or to taste

Peel turnips, halve lengthwise and slice into half-moons 1/4-inch thick.

Heat olive oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches if needed, add turnips. Sauté, turning often and lowering the heat if necessary, until nicely browned and cooked through, about 8 to 10 minutes.

Season with salt and pepper, then transfer to an oven-proof serving dish. If not serving immediately, leave at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, or refrigerate and bring to room temperature, before reheating in a 400-degree oven for 10 minutes.

To serve, mix garlic, capers, lemon zest and parsley; sprinkle over turnips. Drizzle with lemon juice.


 
Nov
10
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Help Kids Ban Toxic Pesticides in NYC Parks,

Playgrounds, and Other Public Spaces!

In 2014, kindergarteners from PS 290 asked their Councilmember to introduce a bill to ban toxic pesticides. In 2015, INTRO 0800 was introduced. In 2017, the children, area residents, and environmental activists testified at a hearing of the City Council Committee on Health.

Now, let’s help the children fulfill their dream – please!

Letter Writing and Phone Call Campaign

We need 18 more Councilmembers to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.

The 8 co-sponsors of INTRO 0800 – 2015 are listed in bold.

Help turn at least 18 City Council from red to green. Ask them to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.

Call or e-mail (https://council.nyc.gov/districts/) or send a snail mail letter to: 250 Broadway. NYC, NY. 10007.


1. Margaret S. Chin.

2. Rosie Mendez.

3. Corey Johnson. (co-sponsor).

4. Daniel R. Garodnick.

5. Ben Kallos. (sponsor)

6. Helen Rosenthal (co-sponsor)

7. Mark Levine.

8. Melissa Mark-Viverito.

9. Bill Perkins.

10. Ydanis Rodriguez.

11. Andrew Cohen.

12. Andy King.

13. James Vacca.

14. Zerega Fernando Cabrera.

15. Ritchie J. Torres.

16. Vanessa L. Gibson.

17. Rafael Salamanca Jr.

18. Annabel Palma.

19. Paul Vallone.

20. Peter Koo (co-sponsor).

21. Julissa Ferreras-Copeland.

22. Costa Constantinides (co-sponsor).

23. Barry Grodenchik.

24. Rory I. Lancman.

25. Daniel Dromm.

Daniel Garodnick:

250 Broadway Suite 1762

212-788-7393 phone

26. Jimmy Van Bramer.

27. I. Daneek Miller.

28. Vacant.

29. Karen Koslowitz.

30. Elizabeth S. Crowley.

31. Donovan J. Richards.

32. Eric A. Ulrich.

33. Stephen T. Levin. (co-sponsor)

34. Antonio Reynoso.

35. Robert E. Cornegy Jr.

36. Rafael L. Espinal Jr.

37. Carlos Menchaca (co-sponsor).

38. Brad Lander.

39. Mathieu Eugene (co-sponsor).

40. Darlene Mealy (co-sponsor).

41. Inez Barron.

42. Vincent Gentile.

43. David G. Greenfield.

44. Jumaane D. Williams.

45. Alan N. Maisel.

46. Mark Treyger.

47. Chaim M. Deutsch.

48. Deborah Rose.

49. Steven Matteo.

50. Joseph C. Borelli.


Sample letters.

Feel free to use these or write your own letter. Send to 250 Broadway. NYC, NY 10007

Your name

Address

New York City, New York (zipcode)

Dear City Council Member __________,

I call on you to support INTRO 800 which would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City properties, including parks. This important legislation is so important in protecting our health. Eliminating toxic pesticides in parks and other public spaces will also protect our water waterways from toxic runoff.

I urge you to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.

Sincerely,

__________________________

For children

Your name

Address

New York City, New York (zipcode)

Dear City Council Member ________,

I am a student at ______________________________. I am _____ years old. Please support INTRO 0800 which will ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks, playgrounds, and public spaces. Toxic pesticides are really bad for children. Please co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.

Sincerely,

___________________

Talking Points for phone calls

Hello. My name is ________________. I’m calling about INTRO 0800, a bill that would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks and public spaces.

I would like Council member _____________ to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 because:

Pesticides like Roundup have glyphosate which is so dangerous for children, adults, and animals.

Pesticides can get into the water supply.

Add any other points you want to make.

Do you think that Council member __________________ will co-sponsor INTRO 0800?

Thank you very much. (If they are not sure yet, ask them to call you back, or you can agree to call them back.)

If a Council member says, yes, they will co-sponsor INTRO 0800, please let us know at www.intro0800.com.

November 2017

Mitchell Silver

Commissioner, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

The Arsenal

Central Park

830 Fifth Ave

New York, NY 10065

Dear Commissioner Silver,

We ask you with a great sense of urgency to thoughtfully consider supporting New York City Legislation INTRO 0800, which would ban the use of toxic pesticides on New York City parks and properties.

There are a growing number of parents throughout the city who are very concerned about the many toxic chemicals used throughout the city and we are looking to you to help make a positive change for the sake of our children.

This important legislation has long been needed to protect the health of all New Yorkers

who regularly utilize the parks and live in nearby apartments, especially our children.  City children already bear an unusually high chemical burden, and eliminating this unnecessary use of pesticides will have a positive impact on their health.

Non-toxic lawn and landscape products, which are widely available and have proven to be effective alternatives to toxic chemical pesticides, have been used very successfully in several of our city parks.

We very much appreciate your support of this effort by concerned citizens of this great city and need your help to convince our council members to pass INTRO 0800-2015.

Sincerely,

Help Kids Ban Toxic Pesticides in NYC Parks,               Playgrounds, and Other Public Spaces!
In 2014, kindergarteners from PS 290 asked their Councilmember to introduce a bill to ban toxic pesticides. In 2015, INTRO 0800 was introduced. In 2017, the children, area residents, and environmental activists testified at a hearing of the City Council Committee on Health.
Now, let’s help the children fulfill their dream – please!
Letter Writing and Phone Call Campaign
We need 18 more Councilmembers to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.  The 8 co-sponsors of INTRO 0800 – 2015 are listed in bold.  Help turn at least 18 City Council from red to green. Ask them to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.  Call or e-mail (https://council.nyc.gov/districts/) or send a snail mail letter to: 250 Broadway. NYC, NY. 10007.
1. Margaret S. Chin.
2. Rosie Mendez.
3. Corey Johnson. (co-sponsor).
4. Daniel R. Garodnick.
5. Ben Kallos. (sponsor)
6. Helen Rosenthal (co-sponsor)
7. Mark Levine.
8. Melissa Mark-Viverito.
9. Bill Perkins.
10. Ydanis Rodriguez.
11. Andrew Cohen.
12. Andy King.
13. James Vacca.
14. Zerega Fernando Cabrera.
15. Ritchie J. Torres.
16. Vanessa L. Gibson.
17. Rafael Salamanca Jr.
18. Annabel Palma.
19. Paul Vallone.
20. Peter Koo (co-sponsor).
21. Julissa Ferreras-Copeland.
22. Costa Constantinides (co-sponsor).
23. Barry Grodenchik.
24. Rory I. Lancman.
25. Daniel Dromm.
Daniel Garodnick:
250 Broadway Suite 1762
212-788-7393 phone
26. Jimmy Van Bramer.
27. I. Daneek Miller.
28. Vacant.
29. Karen Koslowitz.
30. Elizabeth S. Crowley.
31. Donovan J. Richards.
32. Eric A. Ulrich.
33. Stephen T. Levin. (co-sponsor)
34. Antonio Reynoso.
35. Robert E. Cornegy Jr.
36. Rafael L. Espinal Jr.
37. Carlos Menchaca (co-sponsor).
38. Brad Lander.
39. Mathieu Eugene (co-sponsor).
40. Darlene Mealy (co-sponsor).
41. Inez Barron.
42. Vincent Gentile.
43. David G. Greenfield.
44. Jumaane D. Williams.
45. Alan N. Maisel.
46. Mark Treyger.
47. Chaim M. Deutsch.
48. Deborah Rose.
49. Steven Matteo.
50. Joseph C. Borelli.
Sample letters.   Feel free to use these or write your own letter. Send to 250 Broadway. NYC, NY 10007
Your name
Address
New York City, New York (zipcode)
Dear City Council Member __________,
I call on you to support INTRO 800 which would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City properties, including parks. This important legislation is so important in protecting our health. Eliminating toxic pesticides in parks and other public spaces will also protect our water waterways from toxic runoff.
I urge you to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.
Sincerely,       __________________________
For children
Your name
Address
New York City, New York (zipcode)
Dear City Council Member ________,
I am a student at ______________________________. I am _____ years old. Please support INTRO 0800 which will ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks, playgrounds, and public spaces. Toxic pesticides are really bad for children. Please co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.
Sincerely,
___________________
Talking Points for phone calls
Hello. My name is ________________. I’m calling about INTRO 0800, a bill that would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks and public spaces.
I would like Council member _____________ to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 because:
Pesticides like Roundup have glyphosate which is so dangerous for children, adults, and animals.
Pesticides can get into the water supply.
Add any other points you want to make.
Do you think that Council member __________________ will co-sponsor INTRO 0800?
Thank you very much. (If they are not sure yet, ask them to call you back, or you can agree to call them back.)
If a Council member says, yes, they will co-sponsor INTRO 0800, please let us know at www.intro0800.com.