Jun
12
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Hi, All:

I hope you all enjoyed your lettuce last week. I had eaten only two heads by Friday—but then I served lunch and dinner to four people over the weekend, and the rest of the lettuce was gone after a side salad with an incredible blue cheese dressing and a big main-dish lunch salad with tofu, cannellini beans, and olives. I’m ready for more. There are only three heads this week, but we’re also getting arugula.

OUR NEWEST MEMBERS:

There’s a new crop of members, all born since the last pickup in November:

Fiona, born to Lauren and Tim

Kingston born to Katelyn and Max

Gracie, born to Jackie and Alex

And Grace Lynn, born to our farmers Candice and Peter

Congratulations to all the new parents and their families.

While we’re talking about our younger members—congratulations to Rosewho completed her first ballet recital last Tuesday. Three-year-old Rose is a champion twirler.

FRUIT SHARES:
The deadline for optional fruit shares is Friday, June 29. If you want more info about fruits, it’s on the farm’s website:

https://www.stoneledge.farm/csa-program/Fruit-2.htm

Fruit shares run for 20 weeks, starting July 3.

NOTE: Fruit shares are locally grown but NOT CERTIFIED ORGANIC.

CSA EXTRAS

As CSA members, we have the opportunity to buy additional products through two sources:

STONELEDGE MARKETPLACE:https://store.stoneledge.farm/index.php/store/catalog

Honey, maple syrup, coffee, mushrooms, hot sauces, seed oil, Stoneledge apparel and tote bags, cookbooks, and bulk vegetables, herbs, and fruit when available

Order by Monday at noon for Tuesday delivery of most items; mushrooms must be ordered by the previous Friday at noon. Order early for best availability.

LEWIS WAITE FARMS

http://www.csalewiswaitefarm.com

Alan and Nancy Brown have organized a consortium of farms on the Vermont-NY border that delivery a vast array of responsibly-raised products, including meat (many kinds including beef, buffalo, goat, lamb, pork), poultry (chicken, turkey, goose, duck, emu), fish, dairy and eggs (including incredible cheeses), grains and flours, bread, jams, jellies, and condiments, teas, spices, and prepared foods. They deliver every second week (on odd weeks). THE NEXT DELIVERY IS JUNE 19, NEXT TUESDAY.Orders received by Monday, June 18 will be accepted but order early for best availability. Some products, including bread and milk, have earlier deadlines—see the website for more info,

THREE HOLIDAYS

There were three holidays celebrated this week:

Puerto Rico Day, (June 10) which this year focused not only on its famous parade that displays Puerto Rican culture but also on helping the victims of Hurricane Maria

Eid al Fitr, which marks the end of the month of Ramadan,  during which Muslims immerse themselves in reading the Quranand fasting to teach themselves the true meaning of perseverance and tolerance while being empathetic towards the poor and needy. The day is spent with friends and family as they get together indulging in eating and handing out Eidi (gifts given to kids on Eid). Everyone gets new clothes made for the special occasion as every single person wants to look his/her best. The festival revolves around the theme of togetherness and happiness. In essence, Muslims celebrate the blessings bestowed upon them by Allah (SWT). (from https://www.islamicfinder.org/special-islamic-days/eid-al-fitr-2018/

This year, the holiday falls on Saturday, June 18. Eid Mubarak(Blessed Eid) to all who celebrate.

And let’s not forget Flag Day(Thursday, June 14), which commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United Stateson June 14, 1777, by resolutionof the Second Continental Congress. There’s not much going on in NY to celebrate it, but there are big parades in Appleton (WI), Fairfield (WA), Quincy (MA) and sections of Washington, DC.

FREEZING IN PLASTIC

Our member Karen asks: Quick question, which I thought you or other CSA members might have some suggestions on. I’m trying to move away from using zip loc bags (especially for food storage in the freezer – I tend to make big batches of pancakes for the kids’ breakfast) and plastic straws, and have been looking to replace them with reusable versions that are relatively easy to clean and good quality. If you have any thoughts on this, I would appreciate it!

I asked Google; there was info on several sites, such as this one:

https://www.treehugger.com/green-food/how-freeze-food-without-plastic.html

but their main suggestion is glass. I’m not comfortable with glass in the freezer (things always fall out of my freezer). Any other ideas?

RECIPES

I just posted recipes and tips on Greens (including Mizuna, Kale and others), Chinese Cabbage, and Sage on our website: www.chycsa.org

We ask every member to contribute at least one recipe during the season—something you’ve tried and recommend. If you have an old family recipe that you never give to anyone or a recipe that you’ve found that makes your whole life better and easier—that’s the one we want. We prefer, but do not require, recipes that use in-season produce. It does not have to be original, but if you’re taking it from a published source, please provide the source.

ROASTED CHICKPEAS. FROM A MEMBER

Linda, one of our members is the founder of Pulse, a local business that is based in the Bronx. Pulse sells their products at Whole Foods and Fresh Direct. Linda would like to offer us the opportunity to buy roasted chickpea snacks as an add on item. They are vegan and free from major allergens. She’ll bring some samples for us to try at the next pickup; anyone who is interested can order them either tomorrow or as a recurring purchase.

You can check out her website at http://www.pulseroastedchickpeas.com

GREENS/MIZUNA/KALE

All of the greens we get– Swiss chard kale, collards, mizuna and other mustard greens, tatsoi, arugula, sorrel, bok choi, chinese cabbage–can be used interchangeably in the following recipes. Each type of green has its own taste and texture—kale is thicker than Swiss chard or spinach and has a much stronger taste, for example—so the taste of the final dishes will be different depending on which green you use, but most recipes will work no matter which green you use.

The light, wispy greens of spring and early summer will cook very quickly, in about a minute or two. When the greens get thicker  and heavier, do the same thing, just do for longer, for five or more minutes.

You’ll find lots of information about how to prepare, store and preserve greens on Stoneledge’s website, and in Recipes from America’s Small Farms (pages 42-43). But I want to remind you—greens freeze very well. I usually have about a dozen small baggies of frozen greens in my freezer when the CSA season is over, and I take them out one by one over the winter. Just chop, throw them in boiling water and drain completely. Press out all the water, flatten them out and put them in a ziplock. They don’t take up much room—my freezer is tiny—but they are much appreciated when I turn them into quiches, frittatas, and spinach dips in the winter.

SPICY, NUTTY, CREAMY GREENS

Butter &/or olive oil about 3 tbs total

1 tbs chopped garlic or garlicscape

1 small onion, chopped

1 small chili pepper, diced—remove most of the seeds unless you like it very hot– or ¼ tsp ground cayenne pepper

¼ lb sliced mushrooms (optional)

About 6 cups (2 bunches) mixed greens

2 tbs toasted chopped nuts—blanched almonds, pecans, peanuts, or any other nuts; pine nuts are best, but are just too expensive. Sunflower seeds are good, too.

¼ cup sour cream

¼ cup grated cheese

Salt to taste

Heat the butter/oil in a large, heavy frying pan. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until soft. Add the chili pepper and mushrooms and sauté until they are softened; toss over high heat until most of the liquid evaporates. Add the greens; toss until totally wilted. Add the nuts and toss again. Fold in the cream and cheese and stir until combined. Add salt to taste. Serve as a side dish or over pasta or rice.

GREENS AND BEANS

5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced, or one chopped garlicscape

1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper

1 large bunch greens (such as spinach, turnip greens, frisse, chard; about 1 pound), thick stems removed, spinach left whole, other greens cut into 1-inch strips (about 10 cups packed)

1 cup (or more) vegetable broth or low-salt chicken broth

1 15-ounce can cannellini (white kidney beans), rinsed, drained1 teaspoon (or more)

Sherry wine vinegar

Heat 4 tablespoons oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and dried crushed pepper; stir until garlic is pale golden, about 1 minute. Add greens by large handfuls; stir just until beginning to wilt before adding more, tossing with tongs to coat with oil.

Add 1 cup broth, cover, and simmer until greens are just tender, adding more broth by tablespoonfuls if dry, 1 to 10 minutes, depending on type of greens. Add beans; simmer uncovered until beans are heated through and liquid is almost absorbed, about 2 minutes. Stir in 1 teaspoon vinegar. Season with salt and pepper, and more vinegar if desired; drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon oil and serve.

BRAISED MIZUNA WITH SPRING TURNIPS

FROM: http://www.food.comthis recipe is from The Culinary School of the Rockies.

1 bunch baby turnip

1 lb leafy greens (such as Chard, Mizuna, spinach, tatsoi)

2 teaspoons oil, divided

1/2 cup water or 1/2 cup apple juice or 1/2 cup white wine

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Cut the greens from the turnips. Wash and tear all the greens into large pieces and remove the stems. Cut the turnips into bite sized pieces.

Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Sautee the turnips stirring or tossing occasionally until they are crispy outside and tender inside. Season with salt and pepper and remove to a warm plate.

In the same pan, heat the remaining oil over medium heat. Add the washed and wet greens, and add to pan in batches. Stir and mix as they wilt.

Add the wine or other liquid and cook until it is mostly evaporated.

Plate greens and arrange the warm turnips on top.

SWISS CHARD WITH BUTTER, GARLIC AND LEMON

From Cooks.com

1 1/2 tablespoons butter

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 pinch dry crushed red pepper

1 bunch swiss chard, stems trimmed, leaves cut into 1/2-inch-wide pieces

1?2 lemon, juice of

salt

Melt butter and oil in heavy large pan over medium-low heat. Add garlic and crushed red pepper. Sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute.

Add swiss chard; stir to coat. Cover and cook until tender (stirring occasionally); this will take a few minutes if the greens are light, about 8 minutes of they are are heavy—more if you like them very soft.

Squeeze juice from 1/2 lemon onto chard. Season to taste with salt.

DEB’S KALE SALAD WITH APPLE, CRANBERRIES AND PECANS

Author: Cookieandkate.com

The recipe came from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman

Prep Time: 20 minsTotal Time: 20 mins Yield: 4Category: Salad

INGREDIENTS

Salad

½ cup pecans

8 ounces kale (I used regular curly green kale, but Deb recommends Cavolo Nero or Lacinato, Dinosaur or Tuscan Kale)

4 to 5 medium radishes

½ cup dried cranberries (or dried cherries)

1 medium Granny Smith apple

2 ounces soft goat cheese, chilled

Dressing

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 ½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or white wine vinegar)

1 tablespoon smooth Dijon mustard

1 ½ teaspoons honey

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spread the pecans on a baking tray. Toast them until lightly golden and fragrant, about 5 to 10 minutes, tossing them once or twice to make sure they bake evenly. Remove the tray from the oven and set them aside to cool.

Pull the kale leaves off from the tough stems and discard the stems. Use a chef’s knife to chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Transfer the kale to a big salad bowl. Sprinkle a small pinch of sea salt over the kale and massage the leaves with your hands by lightly scrunching big handfuls at a time, until the leaves are darker in color and fragrant.

Thinly slice the radishes (this is easier to do if you first chop off the root end so you can place the base of the radish flat against your cutting board). Add them to the bowl.

Coarsely chop the pecans and cranberries (or cherries) and add them to the bowl. Chop the apple into small, bite-sized pieces and add it to the bowl as well. Crumble the goat cheese over the top.

In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour the dressing over the salad. Toss until the salad is evenly coated with dressing. Serve immediately, or for even better flavor, let the salad marinate in the dressing for 10 to 20 minutes beforehand.

FROM JILL:

DEB’S KALE SALAD WITH APPLE, CRANBERRIES AND PECANS

Author: Cookieandkate.com

The recipe came from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman

Prep Time: 20 mins Total Time: 20 mins Yield:

Salad

½ cup pecans

8 ounces kale (I used regular curly green kale, but Deb recommends Cavolo Nero or Lacinato, Dinosaur or Tuscan Kale)

4 to 5 medium radishes

½ cup dried cranberries (or dried cherries)

1 medium Granny Smith apple

2 ounces soft goat cheese, chilled

Dressing

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 ½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or white wine vinegar)

1 tablespoon smooth Dijon mustard

1 ½ teaspoons honey

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

–Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spread the pecans on a baking tray. Toast them until lightly golden and fragrant, about 5 to 10 minutes, tossing them once or twice to make sure they bake evenly. Remove the tray from the oven and set them aside to cool.

–Pull the kale leaves off from the tough stems and discard the stems. Use a chef’s knife to chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Transfer the kale to a big salad bowl. Sprinkle a small pinch of sea salt over the kale and massage the leaves with your hands by lightly scrunching big handfuls at a time, until the leaves are darker in color and fragrant.

–Thinly slice the radishes (this is easier to do if you first chop off the root end so you can place the base of the radish flat against your cutting board). Add them to the bowl.

–Coarsely chop the pecans and cranberries (or cherries) and add them to the bowl. —–Chop the apple into small, bite-sized pieces and add it to the bowl as well. Crumble the goat cheese over the top.

–In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour the dressing over the salad. Toss until the salad is evenly coated with dressing. Serve immediately, or for even better flavor, let the salad marinate in the dressing for 10 to 20 minutes beforehand.

FROM LIZ:

PURPLE KALE & BLACKBERRY SALAD WITH ROASTED HONEY FETA–from Green Kitchen Stories, an incredible site that’s full of vegetarian recipes. It pays to check this one out of the web–the picture of the Kale Salad made me want to run out and get the ingredients immediately.

http://www.greenkitchenstories.com/purple-kale-aubergine-blackberry-salad/

Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup.

Baked vegetables

1 aubergine /eggplant

4 spring onions or 2 red onions

2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

¼ tsp ground cumin

1 pinch ground cayenne

1/2 tsp sea salt

1 handful hazelnuts

Cooked lentils

½ cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils)

1 ½ cup water

1 pinch sea salt

Dressing

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 lemon, juice

2 tsp honey or more to taste

sea salt & pepper

1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint

Other salad ingredients

4 stalks curly kale, green or purple

4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach

2 avocadoes

1 small handful snap peas

1 punnet (small basket) fresh blackberries, halved

Roasted feta with honey (from NYT)

1 block feta cheese, patted dry

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp honey

Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F / 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through.

Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool.

Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking.

Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below.

Keep the oven at 400°F / 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

According to online sources, steaming is the best way of preserving the healthy nutrients in kale. So here are a few steamed kale recipes

WINE-STEAMED KALE

(from https://www.healthaliciousness.com/recipes/wine-steamed-kale.php)

1 onion,

1 cup of cooking wine

1-2 good sized bunches of kale, washed well.

Serves 2-4 people.

Total Preparation and/or Cooking Time: 9 Minutes

–Add 1 cup of cooking wine to a sauté pan and set it to high heat.

–While the pan is pre-heating slice the onion into thin strips

–Add the onions to the pan and let them start cooking.

–While the onions are simmering cut the kale into good sized pieces.

–Add the kale to the onions and keep stirring it while it steams in the wine for 3 to 5 minutes. After that time you are done and have beautifully steamed crisp kale that would be perfect with brown rice, a squeeze of lemon, and glass of red wine.

Steamed Kale with Walnut “Cream” Sauce

FROM: http://www.motherearthliving.com/food-matters/steamed-kale-recipe-with-walnut-cream-sauce

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Greens:

1 large bunch kale, washed and very thinly sliced

]Sauce:

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup water, plus more as needed

1/2 teaspoon Italian style seasoning

1 teaspoon tamari

1 clove garlic, halved (r 1 tbs chopped garlicscape

1. Steam the kale until wilted and quite soft but still bright green, for 8 to 12 minutes, depending on the thickness of the leaf. Transfer the kale to a medium bowl.

2. Put the walnuts, water, Italian seasoning, tamari and garlic into a blender and process until creamy in texture, adding more water if needed, two tablespoons at a time, to achieve desired consistency. Pour the sauce over the steamed kale and toss until the kale leaves are evenly coated. Serve immediately.

Wine Steamed Kale

Kale is a very healthy vegetable and a good source of vitamins A and C, and calcium.

1 onion,

1 cup of cooking wine

1-2 good sized bunches of kale, washed well.

Serves 2-4 people.

Total Preparation and/or Cooking Time: 9 Minutes

–Add 1 cup of cooking wine to a sauté pan and set it to high heat.

–While the pan is pre-heating slice the onion into thin strips

–Add the onions to the pan and let them start cooking.

–While the onions are simmering cut the kale into good sized pieces.

–Add the kale to the onions and keep stirring it while it steams in the wine for 3 to 5 minutes. After that time you are done and have beautifully steamed crisp kale that would be perfect with brown rice, a squeeze of lemon, and glass of red wine.

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Jun

26

TWO GREAT KALE SALADS, FROM JILL AND LIZ

Posted (Lori) in News

I thought we had a good selection of kale salads last year–but new members Jill and Liz each sent a new recipe that shows how much further you can go. Jill’s is fairly simple–20 minutes total time–but includes several layers of flavor. Liz’s salad takes longer to make, but it’s a full meal that sounds delicious, and looks incredible (see the recipe on the original site, URL below).

DEB’S KALE SALAD WITH APPLE, CRANBERRIES AND PECANS

Author: Cookieandkate.com

The recipe came from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman

Prep Time: 20 minsTotal Time: 20 mins Yield: 4Category: Salad

INGREDIENTS

Salad

½ cup pecans

8 ounces kale (I used regular curly green kale, but Deb recommends Cavolo Nero or Lacinato, Dinosaur or Tuscan Kale)

4 to 5 medium radishes

½ cup dried cranberries (or dried cherries)

1 medium Granny Smith apple

2 ounces soft goat cheese, chilled

Dressing

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 ½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or white wine vinegar)

1 tablespoon smooth Dijon mustard

1 ½ teaspoons honey

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spread the pecans on a baking tray. Toast them until lightly golden and fragrant, about 5 to 10 minutes, tossing them once or twice to make sure they bake evenly. Remove the tray from the oven and set them aside to cool.

Pull the kale leaves off from the tough stems and discard the stems. Use a chef’s knife to chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Transfer the kale to a big salad bowl. Sprinkle a small pinch of sea salt over the kale and massage the leaves with your hands by lightly scrunching big handfuls at a time, until the leaves are darker in color and fragrant.

Thinly slice the radishes (this is easier to do if you first chop off the root end so you can place the base of the radish flat against your cutting board). Add them to the bowl.

Coarsely chop the pecans and cranberries (or cherries) and add them to the bowl. Chop the apple into small, bite-sized pieces and add it to the bowl as well. Crumble the goat cheese over the top.

In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour the dressing over the salad. Toss until the salad is evenly coated with dressing. Serve immediately, or for even better flavor, let the salad marinate in the dressing for 10 to 20 minutes beforehand.

FROM JILL:

DEB’S KALE SALAD WITH APPLE, CRANBERRIES AND PECANS

Author: Cookieandkate.com

The recipe came from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman

Prep Time: 20 mins Total Time: 20 mins Yield:

Salad

½ cup pecans

8 ounces kale (I used regular curly green kale, but Deb recommends Cavolo Nero or Lacinato, Dinosaur or Tuscan Kale)

4 to 5 medium radishes

½ cup dried cranberries (or dried cherries)

1 medium Granny Smith apple

2 ounces soft goat cheese, chilled

Dressing

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 ½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or white wine vinegar)

1 tablespoon smooth Dijon mustard

1 ½ teaspoons honey

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

–Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spread the pecans on a baking tray. Toast them until lightly golden and fragrant, about 5 to 10 minutes, tossing them once or twice to make sure they bake evenly. Remove the tray from the oven and set them aside to cool.

–Pull the kale leaves off from the tough stems and discard the stems. Use a chef’s knife to chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Transfer the kale to a big salad bowl. Sprinkle a small pinch of sea salt over the kale and massage the leaves with your hands by lightly scrunching big handfuls at a time, until the leaves are darker in color and fragrant.

–Thinly slice the radishes (this is easier to do if you first chop off the root end so you can place the base of the radish flat against your cutting board). Add them to the bowl.

–Coarsely chop the pecans and cranberries (or cherries) and add them to the bowl. —–Chop the apple into small, bite-sized pieces and add it to the bowl as well. Crumble the goat cheese over the top.

–In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour the dressing over the salad. Toss until the salad is evenly coated with dressing. Serve immediately, or for even better flavor, let the salad marinate in the dressing for 10 to 20 minutes beforehand.

FROM LIZ:

PURPLE KALE & BLACKBERRY SALAD WITH ROASTED HONEY FETA–from Green Kitchen Stories, an incredible site that’s full of vegetarian recipes. It pays to check this one out of the web–the picture of the Kale Salad made me want to run out and get the ingredients immediately.

http://www.greenkitchenstories.com/purple-kale-aubergine-blackberry-salad/

Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup.

Baked vegetables

1 aubergine /eggplant

4 spring onions or 2 red onions

2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

¼ tsp ground cumin

1 pinch ground cayenne

1/2 tsp sea salt

1 handful hazelnuts

Cooked lentils

½ cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils)

1 ½ cup water

1 pinch sea salt

Dressing

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 lemon, juice

2 tsp honey or more to taste

sea salt & pepper

1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint

Other salad ingredients

4 stalks curly kale, green or purple

4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach

2 avocadoes

1 small handful snap peas

1 punnet (small basket) fresh blackberries, halved

Roasted feta with honey (from NYT)

1 block feta cheese, patted dry

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp honey

Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F / 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through.

Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool.

Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking.

Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below.

Keep the oven at 400°F / 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

CHINESE CABBAGE

Chinese cabbage—Also called Napa cabbage–can be cooked like any leafy green, but it works particularly well in Asian salads and spring rolls. Another way to use it is to roast it—tear it into large piece, toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and spread it in a pan or on a cookie sheet. Roast in 400 degree oven for about five minutes until it begins to brown; then remove from the oven—it will become browner and crisper as it rests. If you leave it in the oven longer, the ribs will become softer and tastier, but the leaves will burn (I know, I just tried it). If you want, you can separate the leaves and ribs and roast them separately. You can intensify the flavor by seasoning the olive oil before tossing with the cabbage; slowly sauté a few cloves of garlic or garlicscape, an onion, and your favorite herbs in the oil, letting the flavor develop over 10-15 minutes.

SPICY CHINESE CABBAGE STIR FRY

Adapted from Martha Rose Shulman, New Yotk Time

4 garlic cloves, minced

2 teaspoons minced ginger

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 star anise, broken in half (optional)

2 teaspoons soy sauce (more to taste)

2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar or dry sherry

2 tablespoons peanut or canola oil

1 small Chinese cabbage, 1 to 1 1/2 pounds, shredded

1 medium carrot, cut into julienne

Salt to taste

2 tablespoons minced chives, Chinese chives or cilantro

Combine the garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes and star anise in a small bowl. Combine the soy sauce and wine or sherry in another small bowl.

Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or a 12-inch skillet over high heat until a drop of water evaporates within a second or two when added to the pan. Swirl in the oil by adding it to the sides of the pan and tilting it back and forth. Add the garlic, ginger, pepper flakes and star anise. Stir-fry for a few seconds, just until fragrant, then add the cabbage and carrots. Stir-fry for one to two minutes until the cabbage begins to wilt, then add the salt and wine/soy sauce mixture. Cover and cook over high heat for one minute until just wilted. Uncover and stir-fry for another 30 seconds, then stir in the chives or cilantro and remove from the heat. The cabbage should be crisp-tender. Serve with rice or noodles.

SPRING ROLLS

Chinese cabbage is a favorite ingredient in spring rolls. Shred the cabbage and mix two cups of shredded cabbage with a cup of rice or cellophane noodles, a tablespoon or soy sauce, other vegetables such as sautéed mushrooms, strings beans, or squash. Add diced shrimp or other meat if you like. Mix in a tablespoon on Szechuan or Hoison sauce, or your favorite seasoning and mix until everything is blended and sticks together. Wrap in wonton wrappers (there are pictures on the package showing you how) and bake or fry per the package directions. Or—you can can use the cabbage leaves as a simpler wrapper. Save some large leaves; fold them in half lengthwise, so that the thick rib is in the center. Place the filling on the rib and fold the leafy part around the rib to make a little packet. I’ve found that some kids (not all of them) like these packets and will eat things inside them that they would not otherwise consider.

CHINESE CABBAGE SALADS

NAPA with NOODLES and ALMONDS

1 head napa cabbage

1 bunch minced green onions

1/3 cup butter

1 (3 ounce) package ramen noodles, broken

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

1 cup slivered almonds

1/4 cup cider vinegar

3/4 cup vegetable oil

½ cup white sugar

2 tablespoons soy sauce

Finely shred the head of cabbage; do not chop. Combine the green onions and cabbage in a large bowl, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Make the crunchies: Melt the butter in a pot. Mix the ramen noodles, sesame seeds and almonds into the pot with the melted butter. Spoon the mixture onto a baking sheet and bake the crunchies in the preheated 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) oven, turning often to make sure they do not burn. When they are browned remove them from the oven.

Make the dressing: In a small saucepan, heat vinegar, oil, sugar, and soy sauce. Bring the mixture to a boil, let boil for 1 minute. Remove the pan from heat and let cool.

Combine dressing, crunchies, and cabbage immediately before serving. Serve right away or the crunchies will get soggy.

CHINESE CABBAGE AND TOFU SALAD WITH SESAME DRESSING

From: Deborah Madison

Dressing

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

1 large garlic clove, coarsely chopped

1/2 large jalapeño, seeded and chopped

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon tahini (sesame paste)

1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

Salad

Salt

1 pound soft tofu, drained and cut into 1-inch cubes

4 cups finely shredded Chinese or Napa cabbage (about 1/2 large head)

2 cups spinach leaves, finely shredded (see Note)

1 cup finely shredded red cabbage

1 medium kohlrabi or small jicama, peeled and cut into matchsticks

5 large radishes, cut into matchsticks

1 large carrot, shaved into thin curls with a vegetable peeler

Freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon black sesame seeds or toasted white sesame seeds, for garnish

Combine all of the dressing ingredients in a mini food processor and puree until smooth. Transfer to a bowl. Season with salt and pepper.

Bring a medium saucepan of water to a gentle simmer. Add salt. Put half of the tofu in a small strainer and ease it into the water. Simmer over moderate heat for 2 minutes, then transfer to paper towels to drain. Repeat with the remaining tofu.

On a large platter or individual plates, arrange the tofu, Napa cabbage, spinach, red cabbage, kohlrabi, radishes and carrot strips. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon the dressing over the tofu or pass it separately. Garnish with the sesame seeds and serve.

Make Ahead The dressing can be refrigerated for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Notes To finely shred spinach leaves (make a chiffonade), simply stack and roll the leaves, then cut them crosswise into thin strips with a sharp knife.

EASY KIMCHI RECIPE

Another great recipe from Viveca! She says, “When we get more cabbage or daikon this summer, kimchi is also a great use of all three! This makes a ton, but is easily halved if you want less! I like using other vegetables, like brussels sprouts or bok choi too if you have them on hand.”

1 napa cabbage

1/2 cup kosher salt

About 12 cups cold water

8 ounces daikon radish, peeled and cut into 2-inch matchsticks

4 medium scallions, ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces (use all parts)

1/3 cup Gochugaru (This is a sweet/hot Korean chili powder; you can substitute crushed red pepper (use about half or mix it with smoked paprika; or other chili powder mixes, such as ancho and aleppo. Kalustyan, and other Asian markets, have gochugaru in stock.)

1/4 cup fish sauce

1/4 cup peeled and minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon minced garlic cloves

2 teaspoons dried shrimp (optional)

1 1/2 teaspoons granulated sugar

Cut the cabbage in half lengthwise, then crosswise into 2-inch pieces, discarding the root end. Place in a large bowl, sprinkle with the salt, and toss with your hands until the cabbage is coated. Add enough cold water to just cover, making sure the cabbage is mostly submerged. Cover with plastic wrap or a baking sheet and let sit at room temperature at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours.

Place a colander in the sink, drain the cabbage, and rinse with cold water. Gently squeeze out the excess liquid and transfer to a medium bowl; set aside.

Place the remaining ingredients in a large bowl and stir to combine. Add the cabbage and toss with your hands until evenly combined and the cabbage is thoroughly coated with the mixture. (Highly recommended to use gloves for this portion!)

Pack the mixture tightly into a clean 2-quart or 2-liter glass jar with a tight-fitting lid and seal the jar. Let sit in a cool, dark place for 24 hours (the mixture may bubble). Open the jar to let the gases escape, then reseal and refrigerate at least 48 hours before eating (kimchi is best after fermenting about 1 week). Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

NOTE: An essential ingredient in Korean cuisine, gochugaru (or kochukaru) is a coarsely ground red pepper with a texture between flakes and powder. Traditionally, gochugaru is made from sun-dried chile peppers, and versions that are prepared in this manner are still considered the best tasting. The flavor is hot, sweet, and slightly smoky. Substitutes like crushed red pepper or cayenne just don’t compare!

SAGE

Sage has strong medicinal qualities—it’s anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-bacterial. It’s also an anti-coagulant—one website said that people who are taking other anti-coagulants should be warned. It’s also full of antioxidants and vitamin K. And it tastes good.

I’m not including ways to use sage in stuffings, potpourri, sachets—because it’s still spring and there’s no reason to make the house smell like Thanksgiving. I’m fairly certain that we’ll get sage again in November.

1. Sage butter. Chop fresh sage; mash 2 tablespoons into a stick of softened butter and reform the butter.  Use it on bread or muffins or over pasta. You can also add a teaspoon of lemon zest for lemon sage butter—great with fish.

2.  Sage-infused butter. Heat ½ stick butter in a pan. Add 10 to 12 sage leaves and toss for about five minutes; the sage leaves should darken. Remove the sage leaves with a slotted spoon and discard; use the butter over vegetables, meat, poultry, or fish.

3. Sage cream. Melt a stick of butter in a skillet and add 2 tbs chopped sage; sauté for about a minute. Add ¼ cup of light or heavy cream and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Pour over ravioli or other pasta; also good with any seafood.

4. Sage chicken. Before roasting a chicken, stuff its cavity with whole sage leaves, as many as you can fit. Slide a few leaves under the skin. Dress roasted chicken with sage cream.

5. Sage tea. Dry the sage (see below) and crumble it. Put about two tablespoons in a teacup, and pour boiling water over it. Steep for a few minutes, then strain. Add honey, lemon, and/or ginger. Very soothing for a sore throat.

6. Sage omelette. Add 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage to an omelette; Crumble in goat, feta, or other cheese if you wish.

7. Sage-infused vinegar. Add a sprig of sage to a bottle of vinegar and leave overnight. Use the vinegar in salad dressings. There are many sites that suggest infusing oils with sage as well—but there are also reports of botulism in oils that are combined with other ingredients, so I’m staying far away from the subject.

8. Fried sage leaves. Strip the leaves from the stems. Dip them in beaten egg white and then in flour (season the flour with salt and pepper). Heat vegetable oil in a small frying pan; when it’s hot but not smoking, drop the coated leaves into the pan. Fry for about a minute, until they become crispy, then turn and fry the other side. Serve with fish, chicken, or pork, or add to salad, pasta, rice, or other grain dishes.

9. Tomato Sage Sauce—fromGood Housekeeping

2 pounds ripe tomatoes

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 small onion, finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons butter

1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage

Peel and coarsely chop tomatoes.

In 10-inch skillet over medium heat 1 tablespoon olive oil; cook onion until golden. Add salt and tomatoes with their juice; over high heat, heat to boiling.

Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes, stirring and mashing tomatoes with spoon occasionally. Stir in butter and sage.

9. Sage and pork. Rub pork chops or roasts with a rub made of chopped sage leaves, salt, and pepper before pan-frying or roasting. The leaves should stick to the meat; if they don’t add a little oil before rubbing them on.

10. Apollo cocktail

1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger. sliced

7 fresh sage leaves

1.5 oz gin

1 egg white

0.75 oz simple syrup

0.5 oz lemon juice

Garnish: 1 dash Angostura bitters, fresh sage leaf

Muddle ginger and 7 sage leaves in mixing glass. Add remaining ingredients and shake without ice. Add ice and shake again. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Top with bitters and single sage leaf.

11. Make Sage Tincture(from https://andhereweare.net/what-to-do-with-sage/

Wash and thoroughly dry your sage leaves. Roughly chop them and put them in a glass jar that can be tightly sealed.

Pour vodka or another pure spirit over to cover.

Cover tightly and put it in a dark place (like your cupboard) for three weeks

or so. Shake daily.

Strain out the leaves and put in a dark glass containers.

Uses for Sage Tincture: it’s a great thing to have on hand in your first-aid kit and for making personal care items such as antibacterial mouthwash, and to help heal sore throats and tonsilitis

In a spray bottle as a deodorant (it is a treatment for hyperhydrosis)

As a toner for oily skin

Applied topically to treat eczema and skin rashes, and to relieve bugbites

Applied externally to treat bruises, sprains, and swelling

Used in hair care products for healthier hair and to decrease hair loss (It can also darken hair color for some.)

12. Sage salt.

Mince about 1/4 cup of sage, then tossed it with about a cup of sea salt. To keep the fresh leaves from making the the salt too moist, put the jar in warm, dry spot from a few days.

DRYING SAGEis so simple. Just band together the sprigs you want to dry and hang them upside in a dry place. It will take a few days before they are completely dry and crumbly. Crumble them and store in a tightly-lidded glass jar (if you store in plastic, you’ll have to use the plastic container for sage forever, because the scent is absorbed). Use for tea or in any recipe calling for dried sage.



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