Oct
03
    
Posted (Lori) in News

STORING

Most of the “hard” vegetables in our spring shares—kohlrabi, turnips, radishes—will last a few weeks in the vegetable crisper without any special attention. Cut off the greens and stems and use them separately within a few days. Wrap the bulbs loosely in plastic bags and keep them in the refrigerator.

Some people say that radishes stay crisper if they’re kept submersed in water; wash them, trim them, and place them in a container filled with water, then stored in the refrigerator.

FREEZING

HOW TO FREEZE ROOT VEGETABLES—this will work for turnips and kohlrabi. For radishes, don’t peel, and cut into discs instead of dice.

From: http://www.weedemandreap.com/freeze-root-vegetables-winter/

When it comes to preserving vegetables, there are a couple different ways to go about it. You can freeze them, can them, or dehydrate them. Some people have success with storing their root vegetables in a cool, dry place. This usually involves building a small root cellar.

While all of these methods are great, freezing your root vegetables is definitely the fastest method. It’s really simple. Here’s how to get started.

Step 1: You must first wash and peel your root vegetable.

Step 2: Dice your root vegetables into 1-inch cubes

Step 3: You need to bring a pot of water to a boil. The reason we’re doing this is because we’re going to blanch the root vegetables to prepare them for freezing. Don’t skip this step!

Blanching (scalding vegetables in boiling water or steam for a short time) is a must for almost all vegetables to be frozen. It stops enzyme actions which can cause loss of flavor, color and texture. Blanching cleanses the surface of dirt and organisms, brightens the color and helps retard loss of vitamins. It also wilts or softens vegetables and makes them easier to pack.

Blanching time is crucial and varies with the vegetable and size. Underblanching stimulates the activity of enzymes and is worse than no blanching. Overblanching causes loss of flavor, color, vitamins and minerals. Use one gallon water per pound of prepared vegetables. Put the vegetable in a blanching basket and lower into vigorously boiling water. Place a lid on the blancher. The water should return to boiling within 1 minute, or you are using too much vegetable for the amount of boiling water. Start counting blanching time as soon as the water returns to a boil. Keep heat high for the time given in the directions for the vegetable you are freezing.

Turnips, kohlrabi, and radishes should be blanched for 2 minutes.

Step 4: After blanching, remove from the boiling water and place them right into a bowl of ice water.

Step 5: After a few minutes in the ice water, transfer your root vegetables to a towel to dry.

Step 6: Lightly pat the root vegetables dry, then transfer to a freezer ready plastic bag or a vacuum packed bag.

That’s it! Now your root vegetables should be able to be stored in your freezer for up to 9 months in a regular freezer bag, and up to 14 months in a vacuum packed freezer bag!

TIP – To avoid rubbery root vegetables make sure to start with fresh root vegetables and be sure to not over cook them while blanching!

PICKLING

Pickled Turnips, from David Lebovits, http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2012/09/pickled-turnips-turnip-recipe/

(check out the link for more info)

You can dial down the amount of garlic, but I like the slightly aggressive flavor of the slices in the brine. Use whatever white salt is available where you are, but avoid fine table salt as it’s quite unpleasant and bitter. Gray salt will discolor the brine.

For those who like to tinker, although these are usually served as they are, a few sprigs of fresh dill, or dill flowers, in the brine will take them in a different direction. A hot pepper will add some zip.

3 cups (750 ml) water

1/3 cup (70 g) coarse white salt, such as kosher salt or sea salt

1 bay leaf

1 cup (250 ml) white vinegar (distilled)

2-pounds (1 kg) turnips, peeled

1 small beet, or a few slices from a regular-size beet, peeled

3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced

1. In a saucepan, heat about one-third of the water. Add the salt and bay leaf, stirring until the salt is dissolved.

2. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Once cool, add the vinegar and the rest of the water.

3. Cut the turnips and the beet into batons, about the size of French fries. Put the turnips, beets, and garlic slices into a large, clean jar, then pour the salted brine over them in the jar, including the bay leaf.

4. Cover and let sit at room temperature, in a relatively cool place, for one week. Once done, they can be refrigerated until ready to serve.

Storage: The pickles will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. They’ll be rather strong at first, but will mellow after a few days. They should be enjoyed within a six weeks after they’re made, as they tend to get less-interesting if they sit too long. If you are interested in canning, check here for tips on canning pickles.

PICKLED SHREDDED KOHLRABI

From Serious Eats, by Marissa McClellan

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/11/shredded-kohlrabi-quick-pickle-recipe.html

2 pounds kohlrabi

2 cups red wine vinegar

2 cups water

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons pickling salt

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1 garlic clove, grated

1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns

1/4 red chili flakes

1.

Wash and dry two quart jars. Set aside.

2.

Clean and trim kohlrabi bulbs. Using a mandoline slicer or a food processor, slice kohlrabi into thin sticks.

3.

Divide the shreds evenly between the two jars.

4.

Combine vinegar, water, honey, pickling salt, ginger, garlic, black peppercorns and red chili flakes in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil.

5.

Once brine is boiling vigorously, remove it from the heat and carefully pour the brine over the kohlrabi.

6.

Place lids on the jars and let them sit until cool.

7.

Once jars are cool to the touch, refrigerate the pickles and eat with salads, sandwiches or meat dishes.

Spicy Quick Pickled Radishes

Source: http://cookieandkate.com/2014/spicy-quick-pickled-radishes/

Super simple, spicy pickled radishes that are ready to eat immediately! These pickled radishes are amazing on tacos, burgers, salads and more. Recipe as listed below yields about 1¼ cup pickles.

1 bunch radishes

¾ cup white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar

¾ cup water

3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (this yields very spicy pickles, so use ½ teaspoon for medium spicy pickles or none at all)

½ teaspoon whole mustard seeds (optional)

Optional add-ins: garlic cloves, black peppercorns, fennel seeds, coriander seeds

1      Use a sharp chef’s knife or mandoline to slice the radishes into very thin rounds. Pack the rounds into a pint-sized canning jar. Top the rounds with red pepper flakes and mustard seeds.

2      To prepare the brine: In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, water, honey or maple syrup and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally, then pour the mixture over the radishes.

3      Let the mixture cool to room temperature. You can serve the pickles immediately or cover and refrigerate for later consumption. The pickles will keep well in the refrigerator for several weeks, although they are in their most fresh and crisp state for about 5 days after pickling.

NOTES

Recipe adapted from The First Mess and Bon Appetit.

MAKE IT VEGAN: Substitute maple syrup or agave nectar for the honey.

CHANGE IT UP: To the best of my knowledge, you can pickle any thinly sliced vegetables in this manner. Try carrot ribbons, cucumbers, red onions, cabbage and/or fennel! The thinner you slice the vegetables, the faster they absorb the vinegar solution and taste like pickles.



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