Jun
06
    
Posted (Lori) in News

SAUTEED BOK CHOY

From New York Times, Sam Sifton

1 tablespoons neutral cooking oil, like canola

1 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

1 ½-inch piece ginger root, peeled and minced

¼ teaspoon red-pepper flakes, or to taste

2 bunches of bok choy, approximately 1½ pounds, cleaned, with the ends trimmed

2 teaspoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon chicken stock or water

Toasted sesame oil for drizzling

–In a large sauté pan with a lid, heat oil over medium-high heat until it starts to shimmer. Add garlic, ginger and red-pepper flakes and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 45 seconds.

–Add bok choy and stir carefully to cover with oil, then cook for approximately 2 minutes. Add soy sauce, stock or water, then cover pan and cook for approximately 2 minutes more, until steam begins to escape from beneath the lid of the pan.

–Uncover and continue to cook until liquid is close to evaporated and stalks are sot to the touch, approximately 3 minutes more.

–Remove to a warmed platter and drizzle with sesame oil.

Braised Bok Choy (or Endive, Escarole or Radicchio)

Adapted from “How to Cook Everything” by Mark Bittman

Serves 4

1 tbsp. olive oil

4 bok choy, trimmed at base and cleaned

¼ C minced prosciutto or dry-cured ham (optional)

½ C chicken, beef or vegetable stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 tsp. lemon juice or white wine vinegar

–Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a medium or large non-stick skillet that can later be covered.

–Add the bok choy and cook, turning once or twice, until they begin to brown.

–Add the ham, stock, salt and pepper. Cover and cook over the lowest possible heat, turning occasionally, until very tender, about 20 minutes (or up to 45 for endive, escarole or radicchio).

–Drizzle with lemon juice or vinegar and serve.

Soba Noodle Salad with Bok Choy (from the Kitchn)

Serves 2-4

1 carrot, peeled and cut into thin matchsticks (a mandoline works great for this!)

2 bunches bok choy, sliced into ribbons

1/2 pound dried soba noodles

6 scallions, thinly sliced

1/2 cucumber, peeled and cut into matchsticks

1 tablespoon sesame oil

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 teaspoon hot sauce (optional)

2-4 eggs (optional)

–Fill a medium-sized sauce pan with water and bring it to a boil. Drop the carrots and one tablespoon of salt into the boiling water. Blanch the carrots for 30-60 seconds (depending on how cooked you like them) and then lift them out with a slotted spoon or small strainer. Run the carrots under cold water to stop the cooking and then empty them into a medium-sized bowl.

–Let the water come back to a boil and add the bok choy. Blanch for 30 seconds and then remove using a slotted spoon or small strainer. Run them under cool water and then add them to the carrots.

–Let the water come to a boil again and cook the soba noodles according to package instructions (usually 5-8 minutes, until al dente). Strain the noodles, cool them down, and add them to the bowl with the carrots and bok choy. Add the scallions and cucumbers to the bowl and toss everything gently together.

–Whisk together the sesame oil, rice vinegar, soy sauce, and hot sauce (if using). Pour this over the noodles and vegetables, and then toss until everything is evenly coated.

–If cooking eggs, empty all but 4 inches of the water and let it come back to a gentle simmer. Crack the eggs into individual measuring cups. Add a splash of white vinegar to the water and slip the cracked eggs in one at a time. Poach for 4 minutes for soft boiled eggs or 5 minutes for a firmer yolk. Strain and set aside until serving. –Divide salad into individual bowls and add a poached egg to each bowl. Salad can be served warm or cold, and it can keep refrigerated for about 3 days.

STIR-FRIED MUSHROOMS AND BOK CHOY (DONGGU PEI SHUCAI)

Bok choy undergoes a pleasing transformation when stir-fried: the crunchy white stem develops a caramelized flavor, and the leaves wilt slightly, acquiring a mild sweetness.

Todd Coleman, Saveur

My friend Pan Suefen refers to this kind of preparation as a “dry” stir-fry, because there’s no sauce. The focus here is on earthy mushrooms and brightly flavored bok choy, exploited to their fullest to produce a final result that is greater than the sum of its parts. I love how the dried mushrooms, reconstituted in water, take on a satisfying, slightly chewy texture and a deep umami flavor in the hot oil. The bok choy undergoes a pleasing transformation as well: the crunchy white stem develops a caramelized flavor as it’s left alone for a minute with its cut surface in direct contact with the wok, and the leaves wilt slightly, acquiring a mild sweetness as they cook.

SERVES 2-4 ingredients

Ingredients

6 large dried mushrooms, such as shiitake

1 tbsp. canola oil

1?2 lb. small bok choy, halved lengthwise

1?4 tsp. sugar

Kosher salt, to taste

–Put mushrooms into a medium bowl of water and soak for 2 hours. Drain; squeeze any excess water from the mushrooms and cut off stems. (note from LS: Or use fresh mushrooms) Cut mushrooms into ¼”-thick slices. Heat a 14″ wok (or stainless-steel skillet) over high heat until wok begins to smoke. Add oil around the edge of the wok and swirl to coat the bottom and sides. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer mushrooms to a plate; set aside.

–Return wok to high heat until it begins to smoke. Add bok choy cut side down, along with 2 tbsp. water, and cook, without stirring, until the water evaporates, about 1 minute.

–Add sugar and season with salt. Vigorously stir and toss bok choy until it’s bright green and wilted, about 1 more minute.

–Return mushrooms to wok, toss to combine, and cook until the flavors meld, about 30 seconds. Transfer mushrooms and bok choy to a serving platter and serve hot or at room temperature.



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