Nov
08
    
Posted (Lori) in News

POTATO LEEK SOUP WITH CELERIAC

FROM HELENE:  I just made a great soup with the celeriac and potatoes we just got!

Hopefully it’s useful! Tastes delish!

Ingredients:

2-3 medium leeks, chopped

1 sweet/vidalia onion, chopped

1 medium bulb of celeriac, peeled and diced into 1/4 in cubes

1 tbsp olive oil

8 tbsp butter, cut into 1 tbsp pieces

3 medium potatoes or 6-8 small potatoes, peeled & cut into chunks

6 cups chicken stock

4 sage leaves

salt & pepper

1/2 tsp dried thyme

1/2 tsp paprika (don’t add too much!)

1/2 cup heavy cream or half and half

Method:

1. Prep all ingredients.

2. Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil and 4 tbsp butter in a dutch oven/soup pot over medium heat.  Add celeriac, onions and leeks and sauté until the vegetables are soft and onion is translucent, about 5-10 minutes.

3. Add potatoes, chicken stock, sages and spices and bring to a boil.  Turn heat slightly down and simmer until potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork, about 20-25 minutes.

4. Turn off heat, let soup cool slightly and blend with a hand blender until smooth (alternatively transfer to a blender).  Return blended soup to the pot, add cream, rest of the butter and adjust season.  Simmer over low heat for another 10 minutes, garnish with chives, sour cream and olive oil, and serve hot.

DREAMY ROASTED BUTTER SQUASH AND CARROT SOUP

FROM ANJALI: My husband and kids claimed this to be the best soup they have ever had! So thought I would share :-)

Ingredients

1 butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1 lb carrots, cut into 1/2 inch circles

2 medium potatoes, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

2 tbs olive oil

1 large onion, cut into small dice

3 stalks celery cut into small pieces

3 cups vegetable stock

1 1/2 inch piece ginger cut into coins

5-7 sprigs thyme

2 tbs olive oil

Roasted sunflower seeds

1. Preheat oven to 400f.

2. Mix squash, carrots and potatoes with 2 tablespoons oil, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste

3. Roast in oven for 30-40 mins until soft and starting to brown

4. Meanwhile heat another 2 tablespoons oil in a medium sized saucepan

5. Sauté onion for a few mins.

6. Then add celery and sauté for a few more mins

7. Add stock, ginger and thyme and bring to a boil. Simmer for 10 mins.

8. Add veggies to onion/celery/stock mixture when roasted

9. Remove thyme sprigs.

10. Purée in blender and add water as necessary.

11. Add roasted sunflower seeds as a garnish

THANKSGIVING RECIPES

BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND CIDER BISQUE:

from Recipes from America’s Small Farms, p. 160. I always feel like I’m a better cook when I make this soup. It has a hint of curry, which adds more flavor than most squash soups. It can be made in advance and is a good way to start the Thanksgiving meal.

ROASTED GARLIC

Not a real recipe, but I don’t think I’ve used this great tip because we didn’t get garlic until this week. Just slice off the top of a whole, unpeeled garlic bulb, exposing the tops of the cloves. Wrap the whole thing loosely in aluminum foil and place on a  pan in a 400 degree oven. Roast for about 45 minutes, checking every 5 minutes after 30 minutes. You’ll know when it’s ready by poking the tops of the cloves with a toothpick; they will become totally soft. Take the garlic out and allow to cool completely. Garlic becomes stronger and easier to use when roasted. When cool, you can separate the cloves and squirt out the garlic like toothpaste, no need to mash or mince. I sometimes spread the garlic on toast, and add a slice of cheese.

BEETS WITH HORSERADISH CREME FRAICHE

From Christian Shaffer. Los Angeles Times

About 1 pound of beets, red, gold, or Chioggia, quartered if large

1 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar (or balsamic)

3 tbs good-quality olive oil

1/4 teaspoon toasted ground coriander seeds

1 small shallot, minced

1/2 cup creme fraiche—see note below on how to make creme fraiche

1 tablespoons prepared horseradish

1 tablespoons kosher salt, divided

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1 tablespoons fresh chervil or parsley, whole leaves or rough chopped

1. Boil the beets in enough water to cover, with 1 tablespoon salt, until tender, about an hour.

2. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, oil, coriander and shallot and set the mixture aside for 30 minutes. In another bowl, combine the creme fraiche, horseradish, one-quarter teaspoon salt and pepper and set aside.

3. Drain the beets and, while still warm, peel them. Slice them into wedges, about 8 to 10 per beet, and cool.

4. Pour the vinegar mixture over the beets and let stand, covered, at room temperature for an hour. Spoon the horseradish cream onto a platter, covering the bottom. Using a slotted spoon, mound the beets over the cream. Garnish the beets with the chervil and serve.

CREME FRAICHE is a lot like sour cream, but better. You can buy it in cartons, but it’s pricey; it’s easy to make and I think the homemade version is better.

Instructions from Epicurious: Combine 1 cup whipping cream and 2 tablespoons buttermilk in a glass container. Cover and let stand at room temperature (about 70°F) from 8 to 24 hours, or until very thick. Stir well before covering and refrigerate up to 10 days.

I know—leaving the cream outside the refrigerator for 8 to 24 hours sounds wrong. But it doesn’t go bad, it gets better.

MASHED POTATOES WITH FRIZZLED LEEKS

I don’t think we need a recipe for mashed potatoes, but in case some of you don’t know—one of the best ways to achieve fluffy mashed potatoes is with a ricer; they cost about $10 and it takes just a few minutes to turn boiled potatoes into the fluffiest, softest mashed potatoes ever.

I like my mashed potatoes plain, with just a bit of butter/cream/milk. But you can also add roasted garlic, olive oil, herbs and spices, or other vegetables. I sometimes boil peeled carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, turnips, winter squash, &/or parsnips (especially parnsips) with potatoes  and then rice them all together.

The frizzled leeks make this a little fancier, and they take just five minutes to make. Slice off the hairy top of the leek and then cut thin horizontal slices—just until after the leek turns from white to pale green. Divide the leek slices into rings Mix 2 tablespoons of flour with 1/4 tsp salt and a pinch of pepper in a shallow bowl or plate; add 1 tablespoon of flour. Mix and add more water,  a little at a time, until you get a thin paste.  Toss the leek rings in the flour paste. Pour a neutral oil into your smallest pot until it comes about 2 inches up the sides. Prepare a slotted spoon and a plate lined with paper towels. Put one leek ring in the pot over medium heat; when it begins to sizzle, toss in the rest of the leek rings. In less than 30 seconds, they will brown and frizzle. Remove the frizzled leeks with the slotted spoon immediately—or they will burn—and drain on the paper towels. Serve over mashed potatoes.

I usually do this right before I serve them, but it can also be done in advance.

CHEF JOHN’S COLCANNON (submitted by Lee’at)

3 large russet potatoes, peeled and quartered

2 tablespoons butter at room temperature

4 ounces kale, trimmed and chopped

1 leek, light parts only, rinsed and chopped

1 bunch green onions, chopped, white and green parts separated

2 tablespoons butter at room temperature

salt and ground black pepper to taste

1/4 cup heavy whipping cream

2 tablespoons butter, for serving

1/4 cup green onions to garnish

Boil potatoes in a large pot of salted water until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and transfer potatoes to a large bowl. Add 2 tablespoons butter and lightly mash the potatoes.

Boil kale and leeks in a large pot of water until tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Drain and transfer kale and leeks to a blender. Add white parts of the green onions and 2 more tablespoons butter; blend until smooth, scraping down sides as needed, 1 to 3 minutes.

Stir pureed kale mixture into the bowl of potatoes and continue to mash. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add cream and stir until desired texture. Top with 2 tablespoons butter and green parts of the green onions.

Chef’s Note: You can substitute kale with other leafy greens such as Swiss chard or cabbage.

PILAF WITH KALE

Adapted from ZAHAV, A World of Israeli Cooking, Michael Solomonov

2 cups jasmine rice

Kosher salt

¼ cup olive oil

½ cup sliced onion

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 cups (packed) finely minced kale

½ tsp. ground pepper

pinch ancho, urfa, or another smokey pepper

2 cups rich chicken stock

1 tbs finely ground lemon zest

Cover the rice by several inches in a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Let soak for at least one hour and up to overnight. Drain well.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. War the oil in a large ovenproof pot with a tight fitting lid over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables just barely begin to soften, about 4 minutes. Add the kale and peppers and cook until the kale is tender, another 5 minutes. Add the rice and cook, stirring until the rice is evenly cooked and begins to lightly toast, about 3 minute more.

Add the chicken stock and lemon zest, raise the heat to high and bring to a simmer. Stir with a fork once or twice, add 1 tsp salt, cover and transfer to the oven, Bake until the rice is cooked through, 15 to 20 minutes. Let stand off the heat, covered for 20 minutes before fluffing the rice with a fork.

PATCHWORK PIE

This one-crust, bottomless pie is great after a big meal; you won’t miss the bottom crust, especially if you’re using sweet local apples. Marc Bittman used stone fuit when he published this recipe in the NYT a few years ago, but I find it makes a great apple pie. I sometimes add cranberries or raisins to the fruit.

8 tablespoons (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into about 8 pieces, more for dish

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, more for rolling

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar

3 cups sliced apples and pears,about  1/4” thick

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 cup brown sugar

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice.

Heat oven to 400 degrees and butter a 9-by-13-inch or similar-size baking dish; set aside. In a food processor, combine 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour, the salt and 1 tablespoon sugar; pulse once or twice. Add butter and turn on machine; process until butter and flour are blended and mixture looks like coarse cornmeal, about 15 to 20 seconds. Slowly add 1/4 cup ice water through feed tube and process until just combined. Form dough into a flat disk, wrap in plastic and freeze for 10 minutes or refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. (You can refrigerate dough for up to a couple of days, or freeze it, tightly wrapped, for up to a couple of weeks.)

NOTE: I find that this is enough for two pie crusts. I divide the dough into two discs, and if I’m not making two pies, I freeze one).

2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl toss fruit with remaining flour, white and brown sugar, cinnamon. and lemon juice; place in baking dish.

3. Put dough on a floured board or countertop and sprinkle with more flour. Roll dough into a 12-inch round, adding flour and rotating and turning dough as needed. Cut dough into 3-inch-wide strips, then cut again crosswise into 4-inch-long pieces. Scatter pieces over fruit in an overlapping patchwork pattern.

4. Brush top of dough lightly with water and sprinkle with remaining tablespoon sugar. Transfer to oven and bake until top is golden brown and juices bubble, 35 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool; serve warm or at room temperature.

Yield: 6 to 8 servings.

I was looking for new recipes and realized I haven’t used two of my very favorites this year. Both of  these are perfect anytime, but I usually make them on Thanksgiving Day and we snack on them as we work on the big meal.

BAGNA CAUDA

The name means “hot bath” and the only challenging part of this incredibly flavorful recipe is keeping it warm. I sometimes serve it right off the stovetop; it’s a great snack for the cooks or for guests who hang around the kitchen. For later in the meal, I put a small oven-safe bowl on a tiny hotplate that’s used to keep coffee cups warm.

1 tbs butter

1/4 cup olive oil

4-5 cloves garlic, finely minced or crushed

2-3 anchovy filets, mashed or more to tate

splash of cream (optional)

vegetables and/or bread for dipping

Put the butter and oil in a very small saucepan over low heat. When the butter is melted add the garlic and let it cook, stirring occasionally and watching to make sure it doesn’t burn.It should simmer, but not come to a full boil It will be very fragrant and in about 5 minutes the garlic will be soft. Add the anchovies and keep stirring until they all but disappear. If you wish, add a bit a cream and stir again to combine. Serve hot, with crudités such as asparagus, celery sticks, carrots, turnips, and cauliflower, or bread (usually, people ignore the vegetables and go for the bread).

FOCACCIA

This is one of those Eureka recipes. Simple, fast, versatile, delicious. There’s no salt in the dough, which is why it rises so quickly. It’s finished in about an hour, start to ready-to-eat with only about 15 minutes of active prep time.

It’s fine plain—but toppings turn it into a delicious full meal. Try it with ratatouille; braised greens; anchovies and cheese; olives and capers; carmelized onions. The topping should be warm or hot when spread; after spreading the topping, you can put it back into a warm oven for a few minutes.  I sometimes split the focaccia horizontally and use it for sandwiches, such as egg salad with thinly sliced radish or broiled zucchini, eggplant, pepper, and onion. Focaccia is fine cold and day-old—but not as amazing as it is straight from the oven.

I found this recipe of Allrecipes, just sitting there among all the other recipes that are not as fantastic.

1 tsp white sugar

1 pkg (.25 ounce, 2 ¼ tsp) active dry yeast

1/3 cup warm water

2 cups flour

2 tbs. olive oil

1/2 tsp coarse salt

1. In a small bowl, dissolve sugar and yeast in warm water. Let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.

2. In a large bowl, combine the yeast mixture with flour; stir well to combine. Stir in additional water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until all of the flour is absorbed. When the dough has pulled together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly for about 1 minute.

3. Lightly oil a large bowl, place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 30 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 475 degrees F (245 degrees C).

5. Deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface; knead briefly. Pat or roll the dough into a sheet and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Brush the dough with oil and sprinkle with salt.

6. Bake focaccia in preheated oven for 10 to 20 minutes, depending on desired crispness. If you like it moist and fluffy, then you’ll have to wait just about 10 minutes. If you like it crunchier and darker in the outside, you may have to wait 20 minutes.



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