Oct
16
    
Posted (Lori) in News

DRESSING FOR FALL

Fall salads are different from the ones we make in summer. In summer, the goal, at least for me, is to keep the oven off and the dressing light. When cooler weather comes around, I use:

–heavier, spicier greens like mustard, kale, and cabbage in addition to fall lettuces, like the ones in our share this week;

–cooked ingredients—roasted carrots, butternut squash, and beets, boiled potatoes

–raw veggies like sliced radish, cauliflower and broccoli florets

–chunks of cheese

–nuts

–avocado

–grains, such as quinoa, farro, orzo

–fall fruit: fresh and dried apples, pears, and grapes; orange and grapefruit; pomegranate seeds; persimmons

And the dressings are heavier and spicier as well, often heated. Here are two of them:

WARM CIDER VINAIGRETTE (from the Food Network)

¾ cup apple cider or apple juice

2 tbs cider vinegar

2 tbs minced shallots

2 tsp Dijon mustard

½ cup olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Combine the apple cider, vinegar, and shallots in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook for 6 to 8 minutes, until the cider is reduced to about 1/4 cup. Off the heat, whisk in the mustard, olive oil, salt and pepper.

MAPLE BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE From Land o’ Lakes

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 cup maple syrup

2 teaspoons country-style Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh garlic

1/2 teaspoon salt

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until completely combined.

TAHINI-SOY SAUCE (based on a recipe from Terra Brockman)

¼ cup tahini paste

¼ cup soy sauce

1 tbs chopped garlic

1 tsp lemon juice

hot pepper to taste

Combine and mix well

LEMON DIJON BEET SALAD

From: http://www.poppiesandpapayas.com

Creamy Lemon Dijon Vinaigrette:

Makes about ½ cup dressing

1 ½ tablespoons Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons light coconut milk (using regular coconut milk makes it even creamier)

1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey

Zest of 1 organic lemon

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 organic lemon

¼ teaspoon sea salt

Fresh ground pepper

1. In a 1 cup volume measuring glass add the Dijon, the coconut milk, sweetener, and lemon zest. Stir until combined.

2. Slowly drizzle in the extra-virgin olive oil while stirring. Once combined, add the lemon juice a splash at a time, stirring in between.

3. Add sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste. Pour dressing into a sealable glass jar.

For the Lemon Dijon Beet Salad

Serves one, or two for appetizer

Handful mixed greens

Creamy Lemon Dijon Vinaigrette

3 roasted medium beets, peeled and sliced thin

Cilantro sprigs as garnish (or basil)

1. Roast beets. Place mixed greens onto a serving plate, and drizzle with a little bit of the dressing (you don’t need much because the dressing is very flavorful). Top the greens with the sliced beets. Drizzle with a little more of salad dressing, once again a little goes a long way and garnish with fresh cilantro or basil.

Optional: Top with fresh goat cheese and/or chopped roasted walnuts.

TURNIPS

You can use turnips pretty much like potatoes—boil them, steam them, roast them, mash them. One difference is that turnips can be eaten raw and make great crudités. Cut off the rough tops and greens, peel them and you’re set.

Debbie’s recipe for CREAMY TURNIP SOUP is in Recipes from America’s Small Farm, p. 189. It’s much better when made with vegetable or chicken stock instead of water—but the stock can be the water in which you cooked other root vegetables, such as the ones in multi-root mash, below.

MULTI-ROOT MASH

Mashed turnips are nice; just boil or steam them, add milk, butter, and your favorite herbs and spices and mash like potatoes. But even better: turnips mashed with other root vegetables.

2 tablespoons butter or olive oil

1 leek or onion, sliced thinly

4 cups of roughly chopped root vegetables—turnips, potatoes, beets, carrots, celeriac, parsnips; winter squash and sweet potatoes can also be added.

6 cups water

Salt and pepper to taste

Cheese or sour cream to taste

Chopped chives or other herbs

Melt the butter or oil in a large saucepot. Saute the leek/onion until very soft over medium heat. Then add the chopped vegetables and toss with the butter/oil and softened leek/onion for a minute or two. Add the water and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 30-40 minutes until all the vegetables are very soft. Allow to cool slightly, then pour off most of the water—don’t discard, save it to use as stock, leaving about 1 cup with the vegetables. Transfer to a blender/food processor or use a stick blender to puree until smooth. Or, if you prefer, mash the whole thing with a potato masher.

Add salt and pepper to taste. If you like, add cheese or sour cream and sprinkle with chives or other herbs.

SOUP: To turn this into a soup, add milk or cream until you achieve desired consistency; serve with croutons.

The Best Ever Turnips

Recipe Courtesy of Michelle Urvater, The Food Network

2 pounds white turnips, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch pieces

6 tablespoons butter

4 cloves garlic, peeled

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Bring a lot of salted water to a boil and parboil the turnips for 7 minutes; add the garlic and boil 1 minute longer; drain.

Melt 4-5 tablespoons of butter and cook the garlic and turnips, covered, over low heat for 5 minutes.

Transfer turnips and garlic to a food processor and puree until smooth, adding 4 more tablespoons butter with the machine turned on. Season well with salt and pepper and, if made in advance, reheat in a double boiler.

OVEN-BAKED TURNIP FRIES

1 pound turnips, (about 2 medium), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch wedges

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Coarse salt and ground pepper

1/4 cup grated Parmesan (1/2 ounce)

Preheat oven to 475 degrees. On a rimmed baking sheet, combine turnips, cayenne, nutmeg, and oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss well to coat. Sprinkle with Parmesan and toss gently to combine. Arrange turnips in a single layer and roast until golden on both sides, 25 to 30 minutes, flipping halfway through.

TURNIPS WITH PANCETTA AND SESAME SEEDS

From Dan Barber (Stone Barn and Blue Hill) and Bon Apetit

2 large turnips (each about 8 ounces); or, if you are using smaller ones, cut into halves or quarters instead of eighths.

1/2 cups white sesame seeds

1 large egg

16 very thin slices pancetta (about 1/4 pound)

Vegetable oil (for deep-frying)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Peel the turnips and each cut into 8 wedges. Place the sesame seeds in a medium bowl; whisk the egg in another medium bowl to blend.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Wrap 1 pancetta slice around each turnip wedge, covering most of turnip. Dip each pancetta-wrapped turnip wedge into beaten egg to coat, then dip into sesame seeds, coating generously on all sides. Set aside on wax paper.

Heat 2 inches of vegetable oil in a heavy medium saucepan. Attach a deep-fry thermometer to the side of the pan and heat the oil to 350°F. Working in batches, add sesame-coated turnip wedges to oil, and deep-fry until sesame seeds are golden, about 1 minute (turnips will be very crunchy).

Transfer turnips to paper towels to drain, then arrange on a rimmed baking sheet and bake just until they are beginning to soften, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and divide among 4 plates.

HOW TO FREEZE ROOT VEGETABLES—this will work for turnips and kohlrabi. For radishes, don’t peel, and cut into discs instead of dice.

From: http://www.weedemandreap.com/freeze-root-vegetables-winter/

When it comes to preserving vegetables, there are a couple different ways to go about it. You can freeze them, can them, or dehydrate them. Some people have success with storing their root vegetables in a cool, dry place. This usually involves building a small root cellar.

While all of these methods are great, freezing your root vegetables is definitely the fastest method. It’s really simple. Here’s how to get started.

Step 1: You must first wash and peel your root vegetable.

Step 2: Dice your root vegetables into 1-inch cubes

Step 3: You need to bring a pot of water to a boil. The reason we’re doing this is because we’re going to blanch the root vegetables to prepare them for freezing. Don’t skip this step!

Blanching (scalding vegetables in boiling water or steam for a short time) is a must for almost all vegetables to be frozen. It stops enzyme actions which can cause loss of flavor, color and texture. Blanching cleanses the surface of dirt and organisms, brightens the color and helps retard loss of vitamins. It also wilts or softens vegetables and makes them easier to pack.

Blanching time is crucial and varies with the vegetable and size. Underblanching stimulates the activity of enzymes and is worse than no blanching. Overblanching causes loss of flavor, color, vitamins and minerals. Use one gallon water per pound of prepared vegetables. Put the vegetable in a blanching basket and lower into vigorously boiling water. Place a lid on the blancher. The water should return to boiling within 1 minute, or you are using too much vegetable for the amount of boiling water. Start counting blanching time as soon as the water returns to a boil. Keep heat high for the time given in the directions for the vegetable you are freezing.

Turnips, kohlrabi, and radishes should be blanched for 2 minutes.

Step 4: After blanching, remove from the boiling water and place them right into a bowl of ice water.

Step 5: After a few minutes in the ice water, transfer your root vegetables to a towel to dry.

Step 6: Lightly pat the root vegetables dry, then transfer to a freezer ready plastic bag or a vacuum packed bag.

That’s it! Now your root vegetables should be able to be stored in your freezer for up to 9 months in a regular freezer bag, and up to 14 months in a vacuum packed freezer bag!

TIP – To avoid rubbery root vegetables make sure to start with fresh root vegetables and be sure to not over cook them while blanching!

SAUTEED TURNIPS AND GREENS

Cook peeled and cut-up turnips and sliced garlic in olive oil in a large skillet until tender. Add the turnip greens (or other greens) and cook until just wilted. Season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice.

ROASTED TURNIPS WITH GINGER

Peel and cut turnips into wedges. Toss with sliced fresh ginger, canola oil, salt, and pepper on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with honey and roast at 400° F until tender.

MASHED TURNIPS WITH CRISPY BACON

Simmer peeled and cut-up turnips in boiling salted water until tender. Drain and mash with butter, salt, and pepper. Fold in crumbled cooked bacon and chopped chives; top with shaved Parmesan.

CREAMY LEEK AND TURNIP SOUP

Cook thinly sliced leeks in butter in a large saucepan until soft. Add peeled and cut-up turnips and enough chicken broth to cover. Simmer until very tender. Puree until smooth, adding water or broth as necessary to adjust the consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

TURNIP PICKLES

Pickled Turnips, from David Lebovits, http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2012/09/pickled-turnips-turnip-recipe/

(check out the link for more info)

You can dial down the amount of garlic, but I like the slightly aggressive flavor of the slices in the brine. Use whatever white salt is available where you are, but avoid fine table salt as it’s quite unpleasant and bitter. Gray salt will discolor the brine.

For those who like to tinker, although these are usually served as they are, a few sprigs of fresh dill, or dill flowers, in the brine will take them in a different direction. A hot pepper will add some zip.

3 cups (750 ml) water

1/3 cup (70 g) coarse white salt, such as kosher salt or sea salt

1 bay leaf

1 cup (250 ml) white vinegar (distilled)

2-pounds (1 kg) turnips, peeled

1 small beet, or a few slices from a regular-size beet, peeled

3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced

1. In a saucepan, heat about one-third of the water. Add the salt and bay leaf, stirring until the salt is dissolved.

2. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Once cool, add the vinegar and the rest of the water.

3. Cut the turnips and the beet into batons, about the size of French fries. Put the turnips, beets, and garlic slices into a large, clean jar, then pour the salted brine over them in the jar, including the bay leaf.

4. Cover and let sit at room temperature, in a relatively cool place, for one week. Once done, they can be refrigerated until ready to serve.

Storage: The pickles will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. They’ll be rather strong at first, but will mellow after a few days. They should be enjoyed within a six weeks after they’re made, as they tend to get less-interesting if they sit too long. If you are interested in canning, check here for tips on canning pickles.

PICKLED TURNIP STEMS

From: KRCW Good Food

https://blogs.kcrw.com/goodfood/2014/04/recipe-pickled-turnip-stems/

This is the simplest way to use a bit of vegetable that usually ends up in the compost bin. It is great to have around for a garnish on a pulled pork sandwich or as a simple topping for a chilled summer soup. Try this technique with other greens as well. It’s a fun one.

4 cups small turnip stems

2 garlic cloves

1 sprig fresh thyme

3?4 tablespoon pickling salt

1 tablespoon white granulated sugar 1 tablespoon mustard seeds

3?4 cup cider vinegar 3?4 cup water

Cut the turnip stems into 1?4-inch lengths. Pack the stems, garlic, and thyme into the jars, leaving 1?2 inch of headspace at the top, and set aside.

Combine the salt, sugar, mustard seeds, vinegar, and water in a nonreactive saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes.

Carefully ladle the hot pickling liquid into the jars, leaving 1?2 inch of headspace in each. Cap with lids and bands, cool for 2 hours, and then either refrigerate or process according to the jar manufac- turer’s directions.

The pickles can be refrigerated for 7 to 10 days; if processed, they will keep for up to 10 months.



Comments:
Yorkville CSA» Blog Archive » FALL SALADS on October 3rd, 2017 at 11:53 am #

[...] WEEK 19: FALL SALAD DRESSINGS; TURNIPS Posted (Lori) in News [...]

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