Jun
28
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Dear CSA Member
June has been hot and dry but perfect for Sugar Snap Peas.  New this week is Sugar Snap Peas.  They are so delicious!  Sugar Snap Peas can be eaten raw (our favorite way to eat them) or cooked.  To string the pod pinch the stem and pull the string down toward the other end to remove the stem and the string.  Eat the whole pod.  The entire pea is edible.
Here is a simple and delicious way to cook the sugar snap pease. http://www.stoneledge.farm/csa-program/recipes/67-sugar-snap-peas
Early Caraflex Cabbage is an early, pointed cabbage variety that is also an Heirloom seed variety.  The Cabbage is sweet and makes delicious slaw.  For Cole Slaw recipes go to the farm website Recipe & Produce ID section.  http://www.stoneledge.farm/csa-program/recipes/cabbage
This week you will also be getting Natcha Escarole.  It is a slightly bitter green that is excellent with white beans.  The Lettuces are still abundant and glorious.  (Don’t put away the salad spinner!)  Romaine Lettuce, Red Leaf and Butter- Crunch will be in the share this week.
Summer Savory tastes great with almost anything.  It goes well with many vegetables and is great to make a dressing or marinade.  You can add Summer Savory to your slaw using the Caraflex Cabbage this week.
Marketplace items are available weekly.  Mushroom Share this week is Shiitake Mushrooms.
Enjoy the Harvest.
Everyone at Stoneledge Farm
Cabbage-1 head  Early Caraflex is a pointed, heirloom variety.
Sugar Snap Peas- 1lb
Summer Savory-1 bunch
Summer Squash- Mixed 1 each
White Scallions- 1 bunch
Natcha Escarole-1 head
Romaine Lettuce-1 head
Red Tide Lettuce-1 head
Butter-Crunch Lettuce-1 head
Mushroom Share-Shiitake Mushrooms

 
Jun
28
    
Posted (Lori) in News
SUMMER SAVORY
Though its flavor is somewhat like that of thyme, it’s stronger, so use just a little. It dries very well—just tie a few sprigs together and hang them upside down in a dry place. You can use the dried leaves in potpourri. Use fresh or dry leaves to flavor vinegars or salad dressings. It’s great in any vegetable dish that calls for thyme—just cut the quantity in half.
MORE THINGS TO DO WITH SUMMER SAVORY
–Mash into potatoes; add to tomato sauces; mix into omelettes.
–Sprinkle into any bean dishes; it’s known as the “bean herb”
–Use in any braised vegetable dish, such as braised kale and beans.
–Make herb butter: chop leaves into small pieces. Combine with softened butter; roll into a log and refrigerate until firm. Spread on bread or rolls.
–Mix with olive oil and mashed anchovies; drizzle over steak or bread. or two are dribbled over a good steak, or over toasted bread.
–Make into a rub by chopping the leaves, garlicscape, lemon zest and mixing with salt and pepper.  Rub into meat, chicken or fish, then broil.
–Three Onion-and-Summer Savory Vinaigrette, from The Cook and the Gardener, Amanda Hesser
Combine:
1/2 cup standard vinaigrette
1 shallot or small onion, minced
1 clove garlic, crushed and chopped (or garlicscape)
1 scallion, thinly sliced
1 T freshly chopped summer savory leaves
CABBAGE
To store fresh cabbage: in the fridge in a plastic bag with holes in it: it should keep for a week or even several weeks. If the outer leaves brown, just tear them off—the rest will still be fine.
Stephanie shared a favorite cabbage recipe.  She says, “I made it many times last year and everyone loved it.  I used the jersey cabbage, the red cabbage, and the green cabbage and all tasted great.  I make a vegetarian version without the pork and have sometimes substituted mayonnaise for sour cream.  It freezes well too.”
You can find the full recipe here, with step-by-step photos. Comments note that chicken can be substituted for the pork and that potatoes can be added in a vegetarian verions
http://natashaskitchen.com/2011/01/19/russian-stewed-cabbage
RUSSIAN BRAISED CABBAGE
Prep time: 20 mins Cook time: 50 mins
Total time: 1 hour 10 mins
Serving: 10
1 med – large cabbage head
½ lb or up to 1 lb of pork
1 medium onion
2 large carrots
2 Tbsp of sour cream
4 Tbsp of ketchup
1 Tbsp of brown sugar
2 bay leaves
2 tsp of salt
½ tsp of pepper
6 Tbsp of olive oil
Shred the cabbage into thin slices using mandolin or by cutting it in half or into quarters, then finely shredding each piece with the flat end of the cabbage against the counter. Place sliced cabbage into a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle 1 tsp of salt on the cabbage and scrunch the cabbage using both hands for 30 sec to soften it.
Dice the onion and grate both carrots.
Preheat a large skillet or dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add 2 Tbsp of olive oil. Saute onions and carrots for 5 min, mixing frequently. When almost done, mix in 2 Tbsp of sour cream. Empty contents of the skillet into mixing bowl with the cabbage.
Cut pork into small cubes.
Using the same skillet, add 2 Tbsp of olive oil and cook pork for 5 min over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. When cooked through, add it to the mixing bowl with cabbage, carrots and onion.
Add 1 Tbsp of brown sugar, 1 tsp of salt, ½ tsp of pepper, 4 Tbsp of ketchup and mix all contents of the bowl together.
Add 2 Tbsp of olive oil to large skillet or dutch oven. And cabbage mixture and set the heat to medium. Add 2 bay leaves.
Cover and cook cabbage for 35-40 min, stirring every 15 min. Reduce temperature to medium-low after 20 min. Add more ketchup or salt to taste, if desired. Remove bay leaves before serving.
Notes
Cooking time may vary – if not using a dutch oven, you may need to add an extra 5 minutes if cabbage is not soft enough.
SUSPICIOUSLY DELICIOUS CABBAGE
Serves 2-4
2 tbsp butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced (or 1 finely choppe garlicscape)
1 heaped tbsp grated fresh ginger
1 medium green cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
3/4 cup heavy cream (or less, half-and-half also works)
Salt and black pepper to taste
In a very large pan, heat the butter over a medium heat until it is melted and starting to bubble a little. Stir in the onion and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes, until softened.
Stir in the ginger and cook for about a minute. Then, add the cabbage, stirring well to coat it with the butter and other flavors. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 15-20 minutes, until the cabbage is soft and caramelised.
Turn the heat down to low and stir in the cream, making sure to scrape any browned bits up from the pan bottom. Cover and continue to cook over a low heat for about 10 minutes. Uncover, add salt and pepper to taste. Then cook for a few more minutes, stirring once or twice, to let some of the liquid evaporate. Adjust the seasonings as desired and serve.
OVEN-ROASTED GARLIC CABBAGE; from the PALEO COOKBOOK)
SERVES: 4
1 green cabbage, cut into 1” thick slices;
3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil or melted ghee;
5 large garlic cloves, minced; or 3 tbs minced garlicscape
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Preheat your oven to 400 F.
Brush both sides of each cabbage slice with the olive oil or ghee.
Spread the garlic evenly on each side of the cabbage slices, and season them to taste with salt and pepper.
Roast in your oven for 20 minutes; then turn the slices over and roast them again for another 20 minutes or until the edges are crispy.
CABBAGE AND TOFU
There’s a recipe below that requires about 8 minutes of stir-frying; but this simple, raw version is also fine. Cut the tofu into cubes, and tear the cabbage into bite-size pieces. Drizzle with olive oil and soy sauce; add whatever other vegetables (kohlrabi, greens, squash) that you have on hand, season with salt and pepper.
SPICY STIR-FRIED CABBAGE, TOFU AND RED PEPPER
12 ounces firm or extra firm organic tofu, cut into dominoes
1/2 cup vegetable broth
2 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce, divided
1 tablespoon seasoned rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons sesame oil, divided
5 cups shredded cabbage or about 1/2 cabbage (red, green or both)
1 red bell pepper, julienned (or squash, cut into matchsticks)
3 green onions, sliced (reserve one green onion for garnish)
1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced
2 large garlic cloves, minced (or a tablespoon of chopped scapes)
pinch or two red pepper flakes
himalayn salt & cracked pepper to taste
sesame seeds as garnish
soba or ramen noodles or quinoafor serving; cook while you stir-fry.
Start your quinoa or rice and set aside.
Cut the tofu into dominoes (mine are double domino size) and press between paper towels or dish cloth (there won’t be too much water so this will go quick). In a small bowl or measuring cup combine the stock, 1 tablespoon tamari and rice wine vinegar.
Heat a large wok or large skillet over med. high heat until a drop of water evaporates within a second or two when added to the pan. Add 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil and swirl to coat, add tofu and stir-fry until golden, about 3 – 4 minutes on each side. Add remaining tablespoon tamari/soy sauce, toss together for a few seconds and transfer to a plate.
Swirl in the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, add the garlic and ginger to the wok/skillet and stir-fry for a no longer than 10 seconds, you want to just start to smell the fragrance. Add red bell pepper and stir-fry for 1 – 2 minutes, or until it begins to soften. Add cabbage, stir-fry for 1 minute, add salt, pepper and red pepper flakes, stir-fry another 1 to 2 minutes, or until crisp-tender. Return the tofu and add 2/3 of the green onions to the vegetable mixture, stir in stock/tamari mixture and stir-fry for another minute or, until it has just about evaporated. Remove from heat and serve with quinoa, rice or noodles of choice. Garnish with sesame seeds, green onions and/or cilantro.
Serves 3 generously.
Notes: If you don’t have seasoned rice wine vinegar, simply add a pinch of sugar or teaspoon of maple syrup.
PEANUT, CARROT, AND CABBAGE SLAW
Serves 4
For the dressing:
3 tablespoons peanut butter
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly-squeezed lemon juice
For the salad:
3 cups cabbage, shredded (from one head of a cabbage)
4 large carrots, grated
4 green onions, sliced thinly
4 large radishes, sliced thinly
1 teaspoon sesame seeds, to top
1/4 cup chopped peanuts, to top
To make the dressing, combine all of the dressing ingredients in a small bowl and whisk vigorously to combine.
In a large salad bowl, combine cabbage, carrot, green onions and radishes. Toss with dressing. Top with sesame seeds and peanuts. Serve immediately or chill before serving. This salad is best the day it’s prepared although it’s just fine the next day if covered and refrigerated.
ANDY’S FAVORITE CABBAGE (from Mariquita Farms)
Sliced green cabbage
Sliced onion (red, green or white)
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper
White wine
Sauté the onion and cabbage in oil, then add wine, salt and pepper.  This is a magnificent dish.
ESCAROLE
WHITE BEAN AND ESCAROLE SOUP WITH GARLIC
YIELD: Serves 4
INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
1 large carrot, cut into small dice
5 large garlic cloves, peeled, flattened
3 cups (packed) 1-inch pieces escarole (about 1/2 large head)
4 cups (or more) canned vegetable broth or low-salt chicken broth
3 1/4 cups cooked Great Northern beans or two 15-ounce cans cannellini (white kidney beans), rinsed, drained
1 14 1/2- to 16-ounce can diced tomatoes, drained
2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
PREPARATION
Heat oil in heavy large Dutch over medium-low heat. Add onion, carrot and garlic and sauté until onion is golden and tender, about 7 minutes. Discard garlic. Add escarole; stir 3 minutes. Add 4 cups broth, beans and tomatoes and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until escarole is tender and flavors blend, about 20 minutes. Thin with more broth, if desired. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to simmer before continuing.)
Lade soup into bowls. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and serve.
Braised Bok Choy (or Endive, Escarole or Radicchio)
Adapted from “How to Cook Everything” by Mark Bittman
Serves 4
1 tbsp. olive oil
4 bok choy, trimmed at base and cleaned
¼ C minced prosciutto or dry-cured ham (optional)
½ C chicken, beef or vegetable stock
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp. lemon juice or white wine vinegar
Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a medium or large non-stick skillet that can later be covered.
Add the bok choy and cook, turning once or twice, until they begin to brown.
Add the ham, stock, salt and pepper. Cover and cook over the lowest possible heat, turning occasionally, until very tender, about 20 minutes (or up to 45 for endive, escarole or radicchio).
Drizzle with lemon juice or vinegar and serve.
BURNT ORANGE & ESCAROLE SALAD
From EatingWell:  November/December 2015
Makes: 6 servings
Serving Size: about 1 cup
Active Time: 25 minutes
1 sprigs fresh rosemary
2 tbs honey
4 tbs extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoon cider vinegar
1 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1 tablespoons minced sscallion
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 medium oranges, peeled and cut crosswise into 4 thick slices
8 cups torn escarole (1 head)
1/4 cup slivered almonds, toasted
Coarsely crush or chop rosemary and place in a small saucepan. Add honey and bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove from heat and let steep for 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, whisk oil, vinegar, orange juice, shallot and salt in a large bowl until combined.
Strain the rosemary from the honey and pour the honey into a large cast-iron or nonstick skillet. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add orange slices and cook until they just start to brown, about 3 minutes. Carefully turn the slices over and cook for another 3 minutes. Remove the orange slices to a plate. Whisk the honey and juice from the pan into the dressing in the large bowl.
Add escarole to the dressing and toss well to coat. Serve the salad topped with the oranges and sprinkled with almonds.
TIPS & NOTES
Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 3; refrigerate oranges and dressing separately for up to 1 day. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before finishing the salad.
N

SUMMER SAVORY

Though its flavor is somewhat like that of thyme, it’s stronger, so use just a little. It dries very well—just tie a few sprigs together and hang them upside down in a dry place. You can use the dried leaves in potpourri. Use fresh or dry leaves to flavor vinegars or salad dressings. It’s great in any vegetable dish that calls for thyme—just cut the quantity in half.

MORE THINGS TO DO WITH SUMMER SAVORY

–Mash into potatoes; add to tomato sauces; mix into omelettes.

–Sprinkle into any bean dishes; it’s known as the “bean herb”

–Use in any braised vegetable dish, such as braised kale and beans.

–Make herb butter: chop leaves into small pieces. Combine with softened butter; roll into a log and refrigerate until firm. Spread on bread or rolls.

–Mix with olive oil and mashed anchovies; drizzle over steak or bread. or two are dribbled over a good steak, or over toasted bread.

–Make into a rub by chopping the leaves, garlicscape, lemon zest and mixing with salt and pepper.  Rub into meat, chicken or fish, then broil.

Three Onion-and-Summer Savory Vinaigrette, from The Cook and the Gardener, Amanda Hesser

Combine:

1/2 cup standard vinaigrette

1 shallot or small onion, minced

1 clove garlic, crushed and chopped (or garlicscape)

1 scallion, thinly sliced

1 T freshly chopped summer savory leaves

CABBAGE

To store fresh cabbage: in the fridge in a plastic bag with holes in it: it should keep for a week or even several weeks. If the outer leaves brown, just tear them off—the rest will still be fine.

Stephanie shared a favorite cabbage recipe.  She says, “I made it many times last year and everyone loved it.  I used the jersey cabbage, the red cabbage, and the green cabbage and all tasted great.  I make a vegetarian version without the pork and have sometimes substituted mayonnaise for sour cream.  It freezes well too.”

You can find the full recipe here, with step-by-step photos. Comments note that chicken can be substituted for the pork and that potatoes can be added in a vegetarian verions

http://natashaskitchen.com/2011/01/19/russian-stewed-cabbage

RUSSIAN BRAISED CABBAGE

Prep time: 20 mins Cook time: 50 mins

Total time: 1 hour 10 mins

Serving: 10

1 med – large cabbage head

½ lb or up to 1 lb of pork

1 medium onion

2 large carrots

2 Tbsp of sour cream

4 Tbsp of ketchup

1 Tbsp of brown sugar

2 bay leaves

2 tsp of salt

½ tsp of pepper

6 Tbsp of olive oil

Shred the cabbage into thin slices using mandolin or by cutting it in half or into quarters, then finely shredding each piece with the flat end of the cabbage against the counter. Place sliced cabbage into a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle 1 tsp of salt on the cabbage and scrunch the cabbage using both hands for 30 sec to soften it.

Dice the onion and grate both carrots.

Preheat a large skillet or dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add 2 Tbsp of olive oil. Saute onions and carrots for 5 min, mixing frequently. When almost done, mix in 2 Tbsp of sour cream. Empty contents of the skillet into mixing bowl with the cabbage.

Cut pork into small cubes.

Using the same skillet, add 2 Tbsp of olive oil and cook pork for 5 min over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. When cooked through, add it to the mixing bowl with cabbage, carrots and onion.

Add 1 Tbsp of brown sugar, 1 tsp of salt, ½ tsp of pepper, 4 Tbsp of ketchup and mix all contents of the bowl together.

Add 2 Tbsp of olive oil to large skillet or dutch oven. And cabbage mixture and set the heat to medium. Add 2 bay leaves.

Cover and cook cabbage for 35-40 min, stirring every 15 min. Reduce temperature to medium-low after 20 min. Add more ketchup or salt to taste, if desired. Remove bay leaves before serving.

Notes

Cooking time may vary – if not using a dutch oven, you may need to add an extra 5 minutes if cabbage is not soft enough.

SUSPICIOUSLY DELICIOUS CABBAGE

Serves 2-4

2 tbsp butter

1 medium onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced (or 1 finely choppe garlicscape)

1 heaped tbsp grated fresh ginger

1 medium green cabbage, cored and thinly sliced

3/4 cup heavy cream (or less, half-and-half also works)

Salt and black pepper to taste

In a very large pan, heat the butter over a medium heat until it is melted and starting to bubble a little. Stir in the onion and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes, until softened.

Stir in the ginger and cook for about a minute. Then, add the cabbage, stirring well to coat it with the butter and other flavors. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 15-20 minutes, until the cabbage is soft and caramelised.

Turn the heat down to low and stir in the cream, making sure to scrape any browned bits up from the pan bottom. Cover and continue to cook over a low heat for about 10 minutes. Uncover, add salt and pepper to taste. Then cook for a few more minutes, stirring once or twice, to let some of the liquid evaporate. Adjust the seasonings as desired and serve.

OVEN-ROASTED GARLIC CABBAGE; from the PALEO COOKBOOK)

SERVES: 4

1 green cabbage, cut into 1” thick slices;

3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil or melted ghee;

5 large garlic cloves, minced; or 3 tbs minced garlicscape

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat your oven to 400 F.

Brush both sides of each cabbage slice with the olive oil or ghee.

Spread the garlic evenly on each side of the cabbage slices, and season them to taste with salt and pepper.

Roast in your oven for 20 minutes; then turn the slices over and roast them again for another 20 minutes or until the edges are crispy.

CABBAGE AND TOFU

There’s a recipe below that requires about 8 minutes of stir-frying; but this simple, raw version is also fine. Cut the tofu into cubes, and tear the cabbage into bite-size pieces. Drizzle with olive oil and soy sauce; add whatever other vegetables (kohlrabi, greens, squash) that you have on hand, season with salt and pepper.

SPICY STIR-FRIED CABBAGE, TOFU AND RED PEPPER

12 ounces firm or extra firm organic tofu, cut into dominoes

1/2 cup vegetable broth

2 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce, divided

1 tablespoon seasoned rice wine vinegar

2 tablespoons sesame oil, divided

5 cups shredded cabbage or about 1/2 cabbage (red, green or both)

1 red bell pepper, julienned (or squash, cut into matchsticks)

3 green onions, sliced (reserve one green onion for garnish)

1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced

2 large garlic cloves, minced (or a tablespoon of chopped scapes)

pinch or two red pepper flakes

himalayn salt & cracked pepper to taste

sesame seeds as garnish

soba or ramen noodles or quinoafor serving; cook while you stir-fry.

Start your quinoa or rice and set aside.

Cut the tofu into dominoes (mine are double domino size) and press between paper towels or dish cloth (there won’t be too much water so this will go quick). In a small bowl or measuring cup combine the stock, 1 tablespoon tamari and rice wine vinegar.

Heat a large wok or large skillet over med. high heat until a drop of water evaporates within a second or two when added to the pan. Add 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil and swirl to coat, add tofu and stir-fry until golden, about 3 – 4 minutes on each side. Add remaining tablespoon tamari/soy sauce, toss together for a few seconds and transfer to a plate.

Swirl in the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, add the garlic and ginger to the wok/skillet and stir-fry for a no longer than 10 seconds, you want to just start to smell the fragrance. Add red bell pepper and stir-fry for 1 – 2 minutes, or until it begins to soften. Add cabbage, stir-fry for 1 minute, add salt, pepper and red pepper flakes, stir-fry another 1 to 2 minutes, or until crisp-tender. Return the tofu and add 2/3 of the green onions to the vegetable mixture, stir in stock/tamari mixture and stir-fry for another minute or, until it has just about evaporated. Remove from heat and serve with quinoa, rice or noodles of choice. Garnish with sesame seeds, green onions and/or cilantro.

Serves 3 generously.

Notes: If you don’t have seasoned rice wine vinegar, simply add a pinch of sugar or teaspoon of maple syrup.

PEANUT, CARROT, AND CABBAGE SLAW

Serves 4

For the dressing:

3 tablespoons peanut butter

3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoons freshly-squeezed lemon juice

For the salad:

3 cups cabbage, shredded (from one head of a cabbage)

4 large carrots, grated

4 green onions, sliced thinly

4 large radishes, sliced thinly

1 teaspoon sesame seeds, to top

1/4 cup chopped peanuts, to top

To make the dressing, combine all of the dressing ingredients in a small bowl and whisk vigorously to combine.

In a large salad bowl, combine cabbage, carrot, green onions and radishes. Toss with dressing. Top with sesame seeds and peanuts. Serve immediately or chill before serving. This salad is best the day it’s prepared although it’s just fine the next day if covered and refrigerated.

ANDY’S FAVORITE CABBAGE (from Mariquita Farms)

Sliced green cabbage

Sliced onion (red, green or white)

Olive oil

Salt

Pepper

White wine

Sauté the onion and cabbage in oil, then add wine, salt and pepper.  This is a magnificent dish.

ESCAROLE

WHITE BEAN AND ESCAROLE SOUP WITH GARLIC

YIELD: Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

1 tablespoons olive oil

1 cup chopped onion

1 large carrot, cut into small dice

5 large garlic cloves, peeled, flattened

3 cups (packed) 1-inch pieces escarole (about 1/2 large head)

4 cups (or more) canned vegetable broth or low-salt chicken broth

3 1/4 cups cooked Great Northern beans or two 15-ounce cans cannellini (white kidney beans), rinsed, drained

1 14 1/2- to 16-ounce can diced tomatoes, drained

2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese

PREPARATION

Heat oil in heavy large Dutch over medium-low heat. Add onion, carrot and garlic and sauté until onion is golden and tender, about 7 minutes. Discard garlic. Add escarole; stir 3 minutes. Add 4 cups broth, beans and tomatoes and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until escarole is tender and flavors blend, about 20 minutes. Thin with more broth, if desired. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to simmer before continuing.)

Lade soup into bowls. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and serve.

Braised Bok Choy (or Endive, Escarole or Radicchio)

Adapted from “How to Cook Everything” by Mark Bittman

Serves 4

1 tbsp. olive oil

4 bok choy, trimmed at base and cleaned

¼ C minced prosciutto or dry-cured ham (optional)

½ C chicken, beef or vegetable stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 tsp. lemon juice or white wine vinegar

Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a medium or large non-stick skillet that can later be covered.

Add the bok choy and cook, turning once or twice, until they begin to brown.

Add the ham, stock, salt and pepper. Cover and cook over the lowest possible heat, turning occasionally, until very tender, about 20 minutes (or up to 45 for endive, escarole or radicchio).

Drizzle with lemon juice or vinegar and serve.

BURNT ORANGE & ESCAROLE SALAD

From EatingWell:  November/December 2015

Makes: 6 servings

Serving Size: about 1 cup

Active Time: 25 minutes

1 sprigs fresh rosemary

2 tbs honey

4 tbs extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoon cider vinegar

1 tablespoons fresh orange juice

1 tablespoons minced sscallion

1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

2 medium oranges, peeled and cut crosswise into 4 thick slices

8 cups torn escarole (1 head)

1/4 cup slivered almonds, toasted

Coarsely crush or chop rosemary and place in a small saucepan. Add honey and bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove from heat and let steep for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, whisk oil, vinegar, orange juice, shallot and salt in a large bowl until combined.

Strain the rosemary from the honey and pour the honey into a large cast-iron or nonstick skillet. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add orange slices and cook until they just start to brown, about 3 minutes. Carefully turn the slices over and cook for another 3 minutes. Remove the orange slices to a plate. Whisk the honey and juice from the pan into the dressing in the large bowl.

Add escarole to the dressing and toss well to coat. Serve the salad topped with the oranges and sprinkled with almonds.

TIPS & NOTES

Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 3; refrigerate oranges and dressing separately for up to 1 day. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before finishing the salad.


 
Jun
20
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Dear CSA Member
This is a very busy time on the farm.  The harvest is now well underway but there are greenhouses full of seedlings needing to be transplanted for fall. Weeds are trying to make a hold and there is constant cultivation to keep them under control. It is hard to keep up with all that needs to be done day to day.  It is also a wonderful time of year when months of work which was started in February is ready for harvest.
This is salad season.  It comes and goes quickly so enjoy the greens of spring.  The Romaine can be grilled, Lettuce Soup recipe is on the farm website and if you are invited to dinner or a party, volunteer to bring the salad!  This week the lettuces are beautiful.  The lettuce is mature but still sweet and tender.  Frisee Endive is new this week.  Finely serrated leaves are great in a salad.
Summer Spinach is a staple on the farm and the first delivery will come in your share this week.
It seems a bit early but you may like to make a note on your calendar that the Fall Farm Festival will be held September  3 this year.  It is a great day to share with family and other CSA members on the farm.
The CSA Marketplace is open and you can log into your CSA Member Account to order Honey, Maple Syrup, Coffee and Chocolate.   Mushrooms are also available weekly from the Marketplace.  Mushroom orders must be received by Friday 11 AM.  All of the products that we offer on the Marketplace are grown or produced on small family farms.  Support family farmers locally, in Central America and Grenada with your Marketplace order.  http://www.stoneledge.farm/marketplace
*Please note that the labels for the Maple Industry have changed.
Formally Grade A is now- Maple Syrup Grade A  Dark Color Robust Taste
Formally Grade B is now- Maple Syrup Grade A Very Dark Color Strong Taste
Same syrup, different labeling system
Enjoy the Harvest
Stoneledge Farm
-Romaine Lettuce-1 head
-Frisee Endive-1 head
-Garlic Scapes-4 each
-Summer Spinach-1 bunch
-Summer Daikon Radish- 2 each
-Buttercrunch Lettuce- 1 head
-Napa Cabbage-1 head
-Red Mustard- 1 bunch
-Red Tide lettuce- 1 head
Mushroom Shares-White Button
Any updates to the list will be sent out on Monday night.



 
Jun
20
    
Posted (Lori) in News

VIVECA’S KIMCHEE

Viveca sent a wonderful recipe that can be used with the Napa Cabbage or Daikon that we’re getting this week. She writes:

If we’re getting more cabbage or daikon this summer, kimchi is also a great use of all three! This makes a ton, but is easily halved if you want less! I like using other vegetables, like brussels sprouts or bok choi too if you have them on hand.

Easy Kimchi Recipe

1 napa cabbage

1/2 cup kosher salt

About 12 cups cold water

8 ounces daikon radish, peeled and cut into 2-inch matchsticks

4 medium scallions, ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces (use all parts)

1/3 cup Gochugaru – see note

1/4 cup fish sauce

1/4 cup peeled and minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon minced garlic cloves

2 teaspoons dried shrimp (optional)

1 1/2 teaspoons granulated sugar

Cut the cabbage in half lengthwise, then crosswise into 2-inch pieces, discarding the root end. Place in a large bowl, sprinkle with the salt, and toss with your hands until the cabbage is coated. Add enough cold water to just cover, making sure the cabbage is mostly submerged. Cover with plastic wrap or a baking sheet and let sit at room temperature at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours.

Place a colander in the sink, drain the cabbage, and rinse with cold water. Gently squeeze out the excess liquid and transfer to a medium bowl; set aside.

Place the remaining ingredients in a large bowl and stir to combine. Add the cabbage and toss with your hands until evenly combined and the cabbage is thoroughly coated with the mixture. (Highly recommended to use gloves for this portion!)

Pack the mixture tightly into a clean 2-quart or 2-liter glass jar with a tight-fitting lid and seal the jar.

Let sit in a cool, dark place for 24 hours (the mixture may bubble). Open the jar to let the gases escape, then reseal and refrigerate at least 48 hours before eating (kimchi is best after fermenting about 1 week). Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

NOTE: An essential ingredient in Korean cuisine, gochugaru (or kochukaru) is a coarsely ground red pepper with a texture between flakes and powder. Traditionally, gochugaru is made from sun-dried chile peppers, and versions that are prepared in this manner are still considered the best tasting. The flavor is hot, sweet, and slightly smoky. Substitutes like crushed red pepper or cayenne just don’t compare!

DAIKONS

I’m always happy to get daikons—there are so many ways to use them.

–Slice them thinly and layer into sandwiches; smoked turkey with daikon and egg salad with daikon are two possibilities.

–Make slices a bit thicker and use them as crudités; they are great with hummus and techina

–Shred them; peel, cut into chunks and put them in food processor. Whirl for just a few seconds. Throw them into salads or eat as a side dish. One of my favorite salads is bok choy, watercress, shredded daikon with tahini-soy sauce.

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Daikon with Crisp Tofu (Mark Bittman)

Makes: 4 servings

This has everything you want in a stir-fry: delicious bok choy, with its wonderfully creamy stems; sharp daikon radish; crusty pan-fried tofu; and a load of spice.

Tempeh, the nutty fermented soybean cake, also goes beautifully with bok choy. If you want to use it in place of the tofu, crumble it into the hot oil and stir until it’s crisp, 5 to 7 minutes.

1 head bok choy

4 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 block firm tofu (about 1 pound), cut into 1?4-inch slices and patted dry

1 onion, chopped

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon minced ginger

1 or 2 fresh hot chiles (like jalapeño or Thai), seeded and minced

8 ounces daikon radish, cut into 1?4-inch coins

2 tablespoons soy sauce, or to taste

Black pepper

1. Cut the leaves from the stems of the bok choy. Trim the stems as necessary, then cut them into 1-inch pieces. Cut the leaves into wide ribbons and keep them separate from the stems.

2. Put 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, slide in the tofu, working in batches if necessary to avoid overcrowding the pan. Cook until the bottoms are crisp and golden, 3 to 5 minutes; carefully  flip and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes on the other side. When the tofu slices are done, transfer them to paper towels to drain.

3. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons oil to the pan and raise the heat to medium-high. When it’s hot, add the onion, garlic, ginger, and chile and cook, stirring, for just 1 minute. Add the bok choy stems and daikon and cook, stirring occasionally, until they just lose their crunch, about 3 minutes.

4. Add the bok choy leaves and about 1?2 cup water. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid evaporates and the stems and radish are fully tender, 5 to 10 minutes; add a little more water if necessary. Return the tofu to the pan, stir in the soy sauce, and sprinkle with black pepper. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve hot or at room temperature.

CARROT & DAIKON PICKLES (SAVEUR)

MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

½ lb. carrots, peeled and cut into matchsticks

1½ lbs. daikon, peeled and cut into matchsticks

2 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. plus ¼ cup sugar

½ cup plus 2 tbsp. white vinegar

1. In a bowl, combine the carrots, daikon, salt, and 1 tsp. sugar. Let sit until the vegetables have wilted slightly and liquid pools at the bottom of the bowl, about 30 minutes. Drain vegetables; rinse and pat dry with paper towels. Transfer vegetables to a medium bowl.

2. Whisk together the remaining sugar, the vinegar, and ½ cup warm water and pour mixture over the vegetables. Stir to combine. Set mixture aside to let marinate for at least 1 hour or refrigerate, tightly covered, for up to 4 weeks.

SMITA CHANDRA’S DAIKON CURRY

Note from Lori: I left out the carom seeds and the dried mango; it’s delicious without them, maybe better if you can find them)

2 tbsp. canola oil

1/2 tsp. ajwain (carom) seeds

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped

1 lb. daikon with greens, peeled and cut into ½” pieces, greens trimmed and roughly chopped

1/2 tsp. ground coriander

1/2 tsp. ground cumin

1/2 tsp. ground turmeric

1/4 tsp. red chile powder, such as cayenne

1 tsp. amchur (green mango) powder

Kosher salt, to taste

Chapatis, for serving (optional)

Heat oil in a 12? skillet over medium-high heat. Cook carom seeds until they pop, 1-2 minutes. Add garlic and onion; cook until golden, 5–7 minutes. Stir in daikon and its leaves, the coriander, cumin, turmeric, and chile powder. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, covered, and stirring occasionally, until daikon is tender, about 20 minutes. Stir in amchur and salt; serve with chapatis, if you like.

FRISÉE

FRISÉE-LARDON SALAD

Buying slab bacon rather than sliced allows you to cut it into the perfect size and shape.

SERVINGS: 4

1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar

4 large eggs

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 ounces slab bacon, cut into 1x¼-inch pieces

1 medium shallot, finely chopped

Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

½ cup red wine vinegar

2 large heads of frisée, torn into bite-size pieces

Fleur de sel

2 tablespoons 1½-inch pieces fresh chives

Pour water into a large saucepan to a depth of 2″ and bring to a boil. Reduce heat so water is at a gentle simmer and add white vinegar (it helps the egg whites stay compact). Crack an egg into a small bowl, then gently slide it into the water. Repeat with remaining eggs, waiting until the whites are starting to set before adding the next one (about 30 seconds apart). Cook eggs until whites are just set but yolks are still runny, about 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer eggs to paper towels as they finish cooking.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Add bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, until most of the fat has rendered and bacon is starting to brown, 5–8 minutes. Add shallot, season with kosher salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until shallot is translucent and softened but hasn’t taken on any color, about 5 minutes. Add red wine vinegar. Bring to a boil and cook until reduced by three-quarters, 5–8 minutes. Taste bacon vinaigrette and adjust seasoning with kosher salt and pepper if needed.

Place frisée in a large bowl and drizzle warm bacon vinaigrette over top. Gently toss until frisée is evenly dressed and slightly wilted and season with fleur de sel and pepper.

Divide frisée salad among plates and carefully set an egg atop each. Season eggs with fleur de sel and pepper and scatter chives around.

Do Ahead: Eggs can be poached 4 hours ahead. Place in a bowl of ice water; cover and chill. Reheat in barely simmering water 1 minute before serving.


 
Jun
14
    
Posted (Lori) in News

STORING

Most of the “hard” vegetables in our spring shares—kohlrabi, turnips, radishes—will last a few weeks in the vegetable crisper without any special attention. Cut off the greens and stems and use them separately within a few days. Wrap the bulbs loosely in plastic bags and keep them in the refrigerator.

Some people say that radishes stay crisper if they’re kept submersed in water; wash them, trim them, and place them in a container filled with water, then stored in the refrigerator.

FREEZING

HOW TO FREEZE ROOT VEGETABLES—this will work for turnips and kohlrabi. For radishes, don’t peel, and cut into discs instead of dice.

From: http://www.weedemandreap.com/freeze-root-vegetables-winter/

When it comes to preserving vegetables, there are a couple different ways to go about it. You can freeze them, can them, or dehydrate them. Some people have success with storing their root vegetables in a cool, dry place. This usually involves building a small root cellar.

While all of these methods are great, freezing your root vegetables is definitely the fastest method. It’s really simple. Here’s how to get started.

Step 1: You must first wash and peel your root vegetable.

Step 2: Dice your root vegetables into 1-inch cubes

Step 3: You need to bring a pot of water to a boil. The reason we’re doing this is because we’re going to blanch the root vegetables to prepare them for freezing. Don’t skip this step!

Blanching (scalding vegetables in boiling water or steam for a short time) is a must for almost all vegetables to be frozen. It stops enzyme actions which can cause loss of flavor, color and texture. Blanching cleanses the surface of dirt and organisms, brightens the color and helps retard loss of vitamins. It also wilts or softens vegetables and makes them easier to pack.

Blanching time is crucial and varies with the vegetable and size. Underblanching stimulates the activity of enzymes and is worse than no blanching. Overblanching causes loss of flavor, color, vitamins and minerals. Use one gallon water per pound of prepared vegetables. Put the vegetable in a blanching basket and lower into vigorously boiling water. Place a lid on the blancher. The water should return to boiling within 1 minute, or you are using too much vegetable for the amount of boiling water. Start counting blanching time as soon as the water returns to a boil. Keep heat high for the time given in the directions for the vegetable you are freezing.

Turnips, kohlrabi, and radishes should be blanched for 2 minutes.

Step 4: After blanching, remove from the boiling water and place them right into a bowl of ice water.

Step 5: After a few minutes in the ice water, transfer your root vegetables to a towel to dry.

Step 6: Lightly pat the root vegetables dry, then transfer to a freezer ready plastic bag or a vacuum packed bag.

That’s it! Now your root vegetables should be able to be stored in your freezer for up to 9 months in a regular freezer bag, and up to 14 months in a vacuum packed freezer bag!

TIP – To avoid rubbery root vegetables make sure to start with fresh root vegetables and be sure to not over cook them while blanching!

PICKLING

see the Turnip Pickle recipe in the Week 2 recipes; it can be used for kohlrabi and radishes as well.

PICKLED SHREDDED KOHLRABI

From Serious Eats, by Marissa McClellan

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/11/shredded-kohlrabi-quick-pickle-recipe.html

2 pounds kohlrabi

2 cups red wine vinegar

2 cups water

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons pickling salt

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1 garlic clove, grated

1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns

1/4 red chili flakes

1.

Wash and dry two quart jars. Set aside.

2.

Clean and trim kohlrabi bulbs. Using a mandoline slicer or a food processor, slice kohlrabi into thin sticks.

3.

Divide the shreds evenly between the two jars.

4.

Combine vinegar, water, honey, pickling salt, ginger, garlic, black peppercorns and red chili flakes in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil.

5.

Once brine is boiling vigorously, remove it from the heat and carefully pour the brine over the kohlrabi.

6.

Place lids on the jars and let them sit until cool.

7.

Once jars are cool to the touch, refrigerate the pickles and eat with salads, sandwiches or meat dishes.

Spicy Quick Pickled Radishes

Source: http://cookieandkate.com/2014/spicy-quick-pickled-radishes/

Super simple, spicy pickled radishes that are ready to eat immediately! These pickled radishes are amazing on tacos, burgers, salads and more. Recipe as listed below yields about 1¼ cup pickles.

1 bunch radishes

¾ cup white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar

¾ cup water

3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (this yields very spicy pickles, so use ½ teaspoon for medium spicy pickles or none at all)

½ teaspoon whole mustard seeds (optional)

Optional add-ins: garlic cloves, black peppercorns, fennel seeds, coriander seeds

1      Use a sharp chef’s knife or mandoline to slice the radishes into very thin rounds. Pack the rounds into a pint-sized canning jar. Top the rounds with red pepper flakes and mustard seeds.

2      To prepare the brine: In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, water, honey or maple syrup and salt. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally, then pour the mixture over the radishes.

3      Let the mixture cool to room temperature. You can serve the pickles immediately or cover and refrigerate for later consumption. The pickles will keep well in the refrigerator for several weeks, although they are in their most fresh and crisp state for about 5 days after pickling.

NOTES

Recipe adapted from The First Mess and Bon Appetit.

MAKE IT VEGAN: Substitute maple syrup or agave nectar for the honey.

CHANGE IT UP: To the best of my knowledge, you can pickle any thinly sliced vegetables in this manner. Try carrot ribbons, cucumbers, red onions, cabbage and/or fennel! The thinner you slice the vegetables, the faster they absorb the vinegar solution and taste like pickles.