Nov
04
    
Posted (Lori) in News

I’ve been waiting anxiously for the celeriac to arrive. I have two main uses for this ugly but delicious vegetable: I add it to chicken soup, which makes it much better every time; and I make celeriac remoulade, one of my favorite winter salads. David Lebovitz’s Celeriac Remoulade, below, includes good instructions for preparing celeriac.

I’ve included a few other celeriac recipes—in case we get enough so that I don’t use it all on celeriac remoulade.

NEXT WEEK: I’m going to gather Thanksgiving recipes. If you have any to add, please send them to me.

Celery Remoulade (Céleri Rémoulade)

About six servings

Celery root is pretty easy to prepare, but does discolor a bit once sliced open and grated. So make the dressing before slicing and grating the celery root, for best results. I like mine really mustardy, so I use a fairly large amount. If you’re unsure, start with less; you can add more, to taste, when the salad is finished.

To peel celery root, lop off the root and opposite end with a chef’s knife. Then stand the round root on a flat end then take the knife and cut downward, working around the outside, to slice off the tough skin. In the states, celery root are often smaller, and have more complicated roots, and you’ll need to cut a bit deeper to remove them.

1 cup (240 g) mayonnaise, homemade or store-bought

2 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon of sea salt, plus more, to taste

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

freshly ground black pepper

2 1/4 pounds (1 kg) celery root

1. Mix together the mayonnaise, mustard, 1 teaspoon of salt, lemon juice, and a few grinds of black pepper.

2. Peel the celery root and grate it coarsely.

3. Mix the dressing with the celery root and taste, adding additional salt, pepper, mustard, and lemon juice, to taste.

Note: If the salad is too thick, you can add a few spoonfuls of whole or low-fat milk to thin it out.

Storage: The salad will keep for one to two days in the refrigerator.

SOME NOTES ON CELERIAC REMOULADE FROM NIGEL SLATER

The French can buy this classic winter salad from any corner shop, whereas we probably have to make it ourselves. It is the best use of the knobbly, ivory-coloured root yet devised.

THE RECIPE

Peel then shred a medium-sized (450g) celeriac. The shreds should not be too fine, nor should they be thicker than a matchstick. Toss them immediately in the juice of half a lemon. Mix together 4 heaped tbsp of good mayonnaise, 2 tbsp of smooth Dijon mustard, 2 tbsp of double cream or crème fraîche and 2 tbsp of chopped parsley. Season with salt and black pepper, then fold into the shredded celeriac. Set aside for 30 minutes then serve with thin slices of ham.

THE TRICK

Toss the shredded roots quickly in lemon juice to stop them discolouring and to tenderise them. The dressing should be just thick enough to cling to the roots – in other words creamy without being soupy. Thin the sauce down with lemon juice if it gets too thick. Cream or crème fraîche sounds extravagant, but is essential if the salad is to be more than just roots in mayo. Don’t attempt to keep it overnight. It will become soft and claggy as the celeriac soaks up the dressing. Chop the parsley finely – this is not the time for roughly chopped.

THE TWIST

Beetroot remoulade has a more vibrant colour and a mixture of celeriac and beets is good, but should be lightly mixed so as not to turn the dressing raspberry pink. Poppy seeds, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds make unorthodox but welcome additions, as do chopped toasted walnuts. A lighter dressing can be made using fromage frais instead of crème fraîche.

CELERY ROOT POTATO MASH

3/4 lb russet potato, peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 1/4 lbs celery root, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, peeled, chopped
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon brandy (optional)
1/4 cup sour cream (use lite if you wish)
1 tablespoon fresh dill, chopped (oruse another fresh herb)
salt & pepper

Directions:

1
Place the potatoes, celery root onion & vinegar in a saucepan, cover wi th water, bring to a boil and simmer until the vegetable are cooked and tender. (apprx.25 minutes).
2
Drain the veggies, stir in the brandy, mash the vegetables. Leave them slightly chunky.
3
Stir in the sour cream & dill. Season with salt & Pepper.

Celeriac, chicory and orange salad with toasted cashews

I love raw celeriac in a salad. Its flavour, both earthy and sweet, balances piquant, sharp or bitter ingredients beautifully. Serves four.

75g cashew nuts
2 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp English mustard
2 tsp cider vinegar
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
250g celeriac
1 head chicory
1 large orange

Put the nuts in a dry frying pan, toss over a medium heat for a few minutes until lightly toasted, then set aside to cool.

Combine the olive oil, mustard and vinegar with some salt and pepper, and tip into a mixing bowl. Peel the celeriac and cut it into matchsticks. Toss the julienned root immediately in the dressing to stop it from browning. Trim the chicory and separate the leaves, then add to the celeriac in the bowl. Spread the dressed celeriac and chicory on a plate.

Cut a slice off the base of the orange and stand it on a board. Use a sharp knife to cut through the peel and pith of the orange, slicing it away completely, in sections. Working over the plate of celeriac so any juice that escapes will fall on to it, cut out the individual orange segments, letting them drop on to the salad as you go. Squeeze any juice out of the remaining orange membrane over the salad. Add some more salt and pepper to taste, scatter over the cashews and serve.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Be Choosy

The best-tasting Brussels sprouts are small, firm, and bright green. The leaves should be tight and compact; otherwise, they’re past their prime. Buying them in a uniform size will help them cook more evenly.

Keep Fresh

Store Brussels sprouts in a plastic bag in your refrigerator’s crisper, where they’ll keep for at least one week, if not a little longer. Sprouts still on the stalk will stay fresh longer than those sold individually. If you don’t plan on using them right away, stick the stalk in water and put it in the fridge—as you would do with fresh herbs on the stem—then break sprouts off the stalk as needed.

Draw Out Flavors

Steaming or microwaving Brussels sprouts ensures you’ll get the most nutrients from the vegetable, but for many people, taste trumps nutrition. Brussels sprouts can be sliced or shaved thinly and eaten raw (just look at the raves for Kale & Brussels Sprout Salad), while roasting brings out a robust, sweet, almost nutty flavor. If you want to convert a Brussels sprouts hater, simply toss the sprouts with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and stick them in a 425°F oven for approximately 30 minutes. Alternatively, you can pan-fry sliced sprouts for crunch and texture.

Cook to Perfection

Memories of overcooked Brussels sprouts—mainly boiled—are probably to blame for most people’s dislike of the vegetable, so take care when cooking them. Start by removing any discolored outer leaves. You’ll want to discard any sprouts that are soft. If you’re boiling or steaming, cut an X in the stem so the heat can reach the thicker core. The sprouts should be tender in about five to eight minutes. To roast, cut them in half (or at least the same size) to ensure even cooking.

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH GINGER, RAISINS, AND PECANS

(apapted from Real Simple)

preparation 15 minutes cooking 40 minutes

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved

1/2 cup pecans, roughly chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1/4 cup golden raisins, plumped in 1/4 cup water and drained

kosher salt and black pepper

1. Heat oven to 400° F. On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the Brussels sprouts, pecans, oil, garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Turn the Brussels sprouts cut-side down.

2. Roast until golden and tender, 20 to 25 minutes.

3. Toss with the raisins and ginger; serve hot

Roasted Brussels sprouts and apples

1/2 cup diced apple

8 ounces Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered

2 tablespoons apple cider

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 375°.

2. Combine apple and Brussels sprouts in an 11 x 7–inch baking dish. Add apple cider, olive oil, minced fresh thyme, salt, and freshly ground black pepper; toss well. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until sprouts are tender.

Brussels sprout risotto

Yotam Ottolenghi is chef/patron of Ottolenghi and Nopi in London.  Serves four as side dish, 2 as main.

This dish is way too complicated for my taste, but some of you mentioned that you like the Jerusalem cookbook and complicated recipes. I haven’t tested it.

1 tbs unsalted butter
2 tbsp olive oil
2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped
2 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
2 tbsp picked thyme leaves
2 lemons, 1 shaved into long strips of zest and 1 finely grated
1/2 cup risotto rice
1 lb trimmed brussels sprouts, half shredded and half quartered
1 cup dry white wine
2 cups vegetable stock
Salt and black pepper
About 1/2 cup sunflower oil
2 tbs parmesan, roughly grated
2 tbs dolcelatte, broken up into roughly 1/4” chunks (or use a different blue cheese)
1/2 tsp tarragon, chopped
2 tsp lemon juice

Put the butter and olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. When the oil is hot and the butter melted, add the onion and fry for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft and lightly caramelised. Add the garlic, thyme and lemon strips, and cook for two minutes more. Add the rice and shredded sprouts, and cook for a minute, stirring frequently. Pour over the wine and let it simmer for a minute before you start adding the stock, a teaspoon of salt and a good grind of pepper. Reduce the heat to medium and carry on adding the stock ladle by ladle, stirring often, until the rice is cooked but still retains a bite, and all the stock is used up – about 15-20 minutes.

While the rice is cooking, pour the sunflower oil into a second saucepan; it should come 2cm up the sides. Place on a high heat and, once very hot, use a slotted spoon to add a handful of the quartered sprouts, making sure they are completely dry first; they will still splutter, so be careful. Fry for less than a minute, until golden and crisp, then transfer to plate lined with kitchen paper. Keep warm while you fry the remaining sprouts.

Add the parmesan, dolcelatte, tarragon and half the fried sprouts to the risotto and stir gently. Serve at once, spooning on the remaining sprouts and topping with the grated lemon zest and a dribble of juice.

Yotam Ottolenghi is chef/patron of Ottolenghi and Nopi in London.



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