Sep
30
    
Posted (Lori) in News

TURNIPS

You can use turnips pretty much like potatoes—boil them, steam them, roast them, mash them. One difference is that turnip greens, especially greens from young turnips (and Debbie’s note indicates that these are pretty young) are delicious, cooked like spinach and other greens. Another difference is that turnips can be eaten raw and make great crudités. Cut off the rough tops and greens, peel them and you’re set.

Debbie’s recipe for CREAMY TURNIP SOUP is in Recipes from America’s Small Farm, p. 189. It’s much better when made with vegetable or chicken stock instead of water—but the stock can be the water in which you cooked other root vegetables for Multi-root Mash.

MULTI-ROOT MASH

Mashed turnips are nice; just boil or steam them, add milk, butter, and your favorite herbs and spices and mash like potatoes. But even better: turnips mashed with other root vegetables.

2 tablespoons butter or olive oil

1 leek or onion, sliced thinly

4 cups of roughly chopped root vegetables—turnips, potatoes, beets, carrots, celeriac, parsnips; winter squash and sweet potatoes can also be added.

6 cups water

Salt and pepper to taste

Cheese or sour cream to taste

Chopped chives or other herbs

Melt the butter or oil in a large saucepot. Saute the leek/onion until very soft over medium heat. Then add the chopped vegetables and toss with the butter/oil and softened leek/onion for a minute or two. Add the water and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 30-40 minutes until all the vegetables are very soft. Allow to cool slightly, then pour off most of the water—don’t discard, save it to use as stock, leaving about 1 cup with the vegetables. Transfer to a blender/food processor or use a stick blender to puree until smooth. Or, if you prefer, mash the whole thing with a potato masher.

Add salt and pepper to taste. If you like, add cheese or sour cream and sprinkle with chives or other herbs.

SOUP: To turn this into a soup, add milk or cream until you achieve desired consistency; serve with croutons.

The Best Ever Turnips

4 Reviews

Recipe Courtesy of Michelle Urvater, The Food Network

2 pounds white turnips, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch pieces

6 tablespoons butter

4 cloves garlic, peeled

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Bring a lot of salted water to a boil and parboil the turnips for 7 minutes; add the garlic and boil 1 minute longer; drain.

Melt 4-5 tablespoons of butter and cook the garlic and turnips, covered, over low heat for 5 minutes.

Transfer turnips and garlic to a food processor and puree until smooth, adding 4 more tablespoons butter with the machine turned on. Season well with salt and pepper and, if made in advance, reheat in a double boiler.

OVEN-BAKED TURNIP FRIES

1 pound turnips, (about 2 medium), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch wedges

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Coarse salt and ground pepper

1/4 cup grated Parmesan (1/2 ounce)

Preheat oven to 475 degrees. On a rimmed baking sheet, combine turnips, cayenne, nutmeg, and oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss well to coat. Sprinkle with Parmesan and toss gently to combine. Arrange turnips in a single layer and roast until golden on both sides, 25 to 30 minutes, flipping halfway through.

TURNIPS WITH PANCETTA AND SESAME SEEDS

From Dan Barber (Stone Barn and Blue Hill) and Bon Apetit

2 large turnips (each about 8 ounces); or, if you are using smaller ones, cut into halves or quarters instead of eighths.

1/2 cups white sesame seeds

1 large egg

16 very thin slices pancetta (about 1/4 pound)

Vegetable oil (for deep-frying)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Peel the turnips and each cut into 8 wedges. Place the sesame seeds in a medium bowl; whisk the egg in another medium bowl to blend.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Wrap 1 pancetta slice around each turnip wedge, covering most of turnip. Dip each pancetta-wrapped turnip wedge into beaten egg to coat, then dip into sesame seeds, coating generously on all sides. Set aside on wax paper.

Heat 2 inches of vegetable oil in a heavy medium saucepan. Attach a deep-fry thermometer to the side of the pan and heat the oil to 350°F. Working in batches, add sesame-coated turnip wedges to oil, and deep-fry until sesame seeds are golden, about 1 minute (turnips will be very crunchy).

Transfer turnips to paper towels to drain, then arrange on a rimmed baking sheet and bake just until they are beginning to soften, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and divide among 4 plates.

HERE

Transfer turnips to paper towels to drain, then arrange on a rimmed baking sheet and bake just until they are beginning to soften, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and divide among 4 plates.



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