Sep
16
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BEETS

This week’s recipes are beet-centered.. Many members tell us that they never liked beets until they tasted the ones from Stoneledge. If you thought you didn’t like beets, try the ones in your share and you may change your mind

The easiest way to cook beets is to cut off the tops and bottoms, wrap them loosely in foil—I wrap a bunch, some people say it’s better to do each beet separately—and roast them in the oven (375-400 degrees). If they’re very big, cut them into halves or quarters. I find that they are sometimes done (soft when you poke them) in as little as 30 minutes, but sometimes take up to 90 minutes. I just keep checking them; the only constant I find is that if I am in a hurry and need them to be done fast, they take longer. Once they’re soft, the skins peel off easily.

Other ways of cooking: peel and boil them; peel and steam them; slice and broil them.

They can also be microwaved; there are detailed instructions here:

http://www.healthy-beets.com/fresh-beets.html

And beets are delicious raw—crunchy and tasty. I wouldn’t serve whole raw beets, but grated or slivered, they are excellent additions to salads and slaws. They’re too messy to use as crudités—pink fingers–but thin slices of raw beet are great in sandwiches and salsas

A few recipes:

The BEETBURGER recipe in Recipes from America’s Small Farms is one of my favorites. It takes a long time and uses lots of dishes (plus the food processor)—but if you make a full recipe you can refrigerate the “batter” for about a week and have fresh beet burgers several times.

Honey Ginger Balsamic Glazed Beets (The Kitchn)

Serves 4-6 as a side dish or 2-4 as a luncheon salad

1 pound medium-sized beets, trimmed and scrubbed (about 6) 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons peeled and chopped ginger 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon honey (optional) basil leaves for garnish

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place beets in an oven-proof pan with sides, such as a cake pan. Splash in about 1/4 cup of water and seal the top with aluminum foil. Place in oven and roast until tender, about 45 minutes. Test by piercing a beet with a sharp knife — it should glide right in.

Remove beets from oven and allow to cook a few minutes, just enough to handle them comfortably. Peel beets using a sharp paring knife, or have a little fun and just slip the skins off using your hands. (A very sensual kitchen experience!) Cold beets won’t peel easily, so be sure to do this while the beets are still warm. Slice beets into chunks. At this point you have the option of refrigerating the beets until you are ready to use them.

Heat the butter over medium heat in a large frying pan and add the ginger. Cook the ginger for a minute or two, just until it becomes fragrant. Add the beets and the balsamic and stir. When the beets are hot and glazed, test for sweetness. Add honey if needed and cook a little longer to glaze. Hint: Adding honey and upping the sweetness of this dish is a good way to introduce beets to the haters.

Remove from heat and serve hot. Alternatively, these beets are also really good served at room temperature as a salad.

BEET AND CABBAGE BORSCHT

1/2 cup dried cannellini or other other small white beans

3 large beets (about 2 lbs.)

2 Tbsp. olive oil, vegetable oil, or butter

1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

1/2 tsp. salt, plus more to taste

2 cloves garlic, minced (optional)

1small  head green, Savoy, or Napa cabbage, cored and thinly sliced or shredded

1  tsp. caraway seeds

4 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable broth

Lemon juice to taste

Plain yogurt or sour cream for garnish (optional)

Fresh chopped dill for garnish (optional)

Put the beans in a large pot and add cold water to cover generously. Bring to a boil, cover, turn off heat, and let sit 1 hour. Drain and return the beans to the pot. Cover again with cold water, bring to a boil, reduce heat to keep a simmer and cook until beans are tender to the bite, about 20 minutes. Drain the beans and set them aside.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F. Wrap the beets in a large sheet of foil, place on a baking sheet, and cook until tender when pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. Let the beets sit until cool enough to handle. Peel them (their skins should slip off easily after being roasted) and grate them on the large-hole side of a box grater. Set aside. (Note: I like the ease of peeling roasted beets, but feel free to peel and grate raw beets – they will cook quickly enough in the soup.)

In a large pot over medium-high heat add oil, onions, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, if using, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the cabbage, stir to combine, and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage wilts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the caraway seeds and beets. Stir to combine and add the broth or water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to maintain a steady simmer, add beans, and cook until vegetables are tender and flavors blend, 15 to 20 minutes.

Add salt and lemon juice to taste. Serve hot, with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream and a sprinkle of dill, if you like.

Makes 8 generous servings.

WARM BEETS AND GREENS (adapted from EATING WELL)

8 cups greens (chard, kale, collard, spinach, etc.) torn into pieces or sliced into ribbons

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 cup thinly sliced onion

2 plum tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons sliced Kalamata olives

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1 clove garlic, minced

2 cups steamed beet wedges, or slices, 1/2-1 inch thick

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

]

Place greens in a large bowl.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until starting to soften, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, olives, parsley and garlic and cook, stirring, until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 3 minutes. Add beets, vinegar, salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until the beets are heated through, about 1 minute more. Add the greens to the beet mixture toss over low heat until combined and greens wilt sightly. Serve warm.

ROASTED BEET, PEACH, and GOAT CHEESE SALAD (Allrecipes)

2 beets, scrubbed

1 bunch arugula, rinsed and dried; or a mixture of mesclun

2 fresh peaches – peeled, pitted, and sliced

2 shallots or one small sweet onion, chopped

1/4 cup pistachio nuts or toasted almonds, chopped

1 (4 ounce) package goat cheese, crumbled

1/4 cup walnut oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Wrap beets in foil, and place onto a baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven until the beets are tender. Allow the beets to cool slightly, then remove the skins. Let the beets cool to room temperature, or refrigerate until cold. Once cooled, thinly slice the beets.

Place the greens into a large mixing bowl. Add the sliced beets and peaches; sprinkle with the onions, nuts, and goat cheese. In a separate bowl, whisk together the walnut oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper until emulsified, and pour over the salad mixture. Toss well, and serve.

SPICY BEET, ONION, and WALNUT SALAD

Adapted from Jerusalem—and simplified.

About 1 cup cooked beets, cut into wedges

About 2 cups salad greens—arugula, lettuce, mache, watercress, etc.

1 small onion or leek, sliced into rings and lightly sauted

2 tablespoons of your favorite herbs—basil, parsley, cilantro

Dressing:

1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted (or other nuts)

2 tablespoons crushed garlic or garlicscape

¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes (more or less to taste)

¼ cup cider vinegar

3 tbs. oil—if you have walnut oil, mix 1 tbs walnut oil with 2 tbs olive oil.,

Toss the beets, greens, onions/leeks, and herbs. Mix the dressing ingredients and pour over the salad.

ROSH HASHANAH

Only a fraction of our members celebrate the Jewish New Year; but I think the recipes are useful—and I for one like to hear about other people’s traditions. If anyone has recipes from other cultures, please send them. Our CSA is very diverse—I once counted 16 nationalities among our members—and it would be nice to share.

Rosh Hashanah, for most, means sweet food. Symbolism is big in Jewish and sweet foods symbolize the desire for a sweet year. But it doesn’t stop with sweet. The Talmud, in a rare show of humor, established a series of puns involving food and suggested including them in Rosh Hashanah meals. For example—the word for “carrots” in Yiddish is mirren, which sound like the word for “increase.” So when you eat a dish with carrots, you say: May it be the will of god that our fortunes will increase in the New Year.” The wordplay involves beets, leeks, cabbage, carrots, apples, gourds/squash, dates, and fish heads, but there’s no reason not to create your own based on English rather than Hebrew or Yiddish words. There are recipes for beets (may our enemies be beaten) above; here is one for leeks and one for sweet peppers. And a recipe from stuffed cabbage (may the new year be stuffed with joy). And finally a tomatillo chicken soup, because . . . well, chicken soup is often served on Rosh Hashanah and we have a lot of tomatillos.

CHICKPEA & LEEK PANCAKES

3/4 cup chickpeas

1/4 cup leek

1 egg

bunch of cilantro

salt + pepper

Optional: You can add a tablespoon of flour if you prefer more of a ‘pancakey’ texture, I prefer them sans flour.

Chop the chickpeas, leek and cilantro

Combine all three into a bowl and stir in one whisked egg

Add salt + pepper (and the flour if you wish)

Add a small drizzle of your preferred oil to a fry pan and spoon tablespoon amounts into the pan (this recipe will make 5 or 6 fritters)

Cook each side until golden and serve with a squeeze of lemon or lime or even a bit of Greek yoghurt

PEPPERS WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS

2-3 peppers (any color; our big bell peppers count as 2); quartered or cut into lay-flat slices

2 tbs olive oil

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1 ounce slivered almonds

2 tbs honey

2 tbs sherry wine vinegar

2 tbs fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat broiler to high.

Place peppers skin side up in a single layer and broil for 5-10 minutes till charred. Remove to a paper bag to steam and cool. When cool enough remove skin and discard.  Slice into bite size pieces.

In a large pan, heat oil and add garlic for about 3 minutes add almond for 1 minute add honey and vinegar mixing in, Pour over peppers and garnish with parsley season with salt and pepper. Serve room temperature.

Halupkis: Stuffed Cabbage

2 large cabbage heads, coarse outer leaves removed

2 cups rice, uncooked

2 medium onions, diced

3 pounds ground lean beef

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, ground

2 teaspoons salt

4 eggs, beaten

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

1 (14.5 ounce) can tomato sauce (or fresh tomato sauce)

1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth (or fresh chicken soup)

1 can chopped tomatoes

1 chopped hot pepper—remove seeds to adjust heat

Remove the center core of each head of cabbage. Place in large pot of boiling water. Boil until soft, removing each leaf as it softens. Let leaves cool, then trim the thick rib on each leaf. Reserve 14.5 ounces of the cabbage cooking water.

Boil rice in a separate saucepot until half cooked. Drain and set aside.

In a bowl combine beef, partially cooked rice, pepper, salt, eggs, cooked onion-bacon mixture, paprika, and celery salt. Measure the mixture with medium sized ice-cream scoop to make each halupki the same size.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

On each separate cabbage leaf, place 1 scoop of the meat mixture at the bottom of the leaf and roll, tightly tucking the sides to cover the mixture. Line the bottom of a roasting pan (not aluminum) with cabbage leaves that are too dark or to small to use for rolling. Place halupkis in roasting pan, making 2 layers.

Combine tomato sauce, broth, chopped tomatoes, and reserved cooking liquid and pour over halupki. Cover and bake for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more liquid, if needed.

They taste best the next day.

SPICY CHICKEN AND TOMATILLO SOUP

From: What’s Cooking America

2 whole chicken breasts, boneless and skinless 1 pound tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and quartered 1 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced 1 Russet potato, peeled and quartered 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 to 2 fresh jalapeno chile peppers (stems and seeds removed) or according to your taste 4 cups chicken broth or stock 3 cups water Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste 1/4 cup sour cream (optional) 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Prepare Tomatillos: Remove the husks before using, the husks are inedible. Tomatillos are very easy to cook with because they don’t need to be peeled or seeded. Their texture is firm when raw, but soften when cooked. Rinse before using as the tomatillo is covered by a sticky substance. Do not peel the green skin.

In a large soup pot (or cast-iron Dutch oven) over medium heat, add chicken, onion, garlic, tomatillos, potato, oregano, chile pepper, chicken stock, and water; cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce head to low and simmer 20 to 30 minutes until chicken is tender and the meat falls from the bone. Remove chicken from the pot to a bowl or plate and set aside to cool (when cool, take meat from the bones and shred into pieces). Refrigerate cooked chicken until ready to use.

Remove the soup pot from the heat and let the vegetables and broth cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree the vegetable and broth in a blender or food processor.

When ready to serve, reheat the vegetable soup puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until hot. Adjust seasoning if necessary.

To serve, place a small pile of the shredded chicken into each soup bowl. Ladle the pureed soup around the pile of chicken in each bowl. Top each bowl of soup with sour cream and cilantro.

1/4 cup canola oil

1/2 teaspoon sugar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 (15-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained

Directions

Combine the first 6 ingredients in a bowl.

In a separate small bowl, whisk together the rice wine vinegar, canola oil, sugar, and salt and pepper.

Toss all together and let marinate for at up to 8 hours in the refrigerator before serving.

BEETS

This week’s recipes are beet-centered.. Many members tell us that they never liked beets until they tasted the ones from Stoneledge. If you thought you didn’t like beets, try the ones in your share and you may change your mind

The easiest way to cook beets is to cut off the tops and bottoms, wrap them loosely in foil—I wrap a bunch, some people say it’s better to do each beet separately—and roast them in the oven (375-400 degrees). If they’re very big, cut them into halves or quarters. I find that they are sometimes done (soft when you poke them) in as little as 30 minutes, but sometimes take up to 90 minutes. I just keep checking them; the only constant I find is that if I am in a hurry and need them to be done fast, they take longer. Once they’re soft, the skins peel off easily.

Other ways of cooking: peel and boil them; peel and steam them; slice and broil them.

They can also be microwaved; there are detailed instructions here:

http://www.healthy-beets.com/fresh-beets.html

And beets are delicious raw—crunchy and tasty. I wouldn’t serve whole raw beets, but grated or slivered, they are excellent additions to salads and slaws. They’re too messy to use as crudités—pink fingers–but thin slices of raw beet are great in sandwiches and salsas

A few recipes:

The BEETBURGER recipe in Recipes from America’s Small Farms is one of my favorites. It takes a long time and uses lots of dishes (plus the food processor)—but if you make a full recipe you can refrigerate the “batter” for about a week and have fresh beet burgers several times.

Honey Ginger Balsamic Glazed Beets (The Kitchn)

Serves 4-6 as a side dish or 2-4 as a luncheon salad

1 pound medium-sized beets, trimmed and scrubbed (about 6) 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons peeled and chopped ginger 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon honey (optional) basil leaves for garnish

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place beets in an oven-proof pan with sides, such as a cake pan. Splash in about 1/4 cup of water and seal the top with aluminum foil. Place in oven and roast until tender, about 45 minutes. Test by piercing a beet with a sharp knife — it should glide right in.

Remove beets from oven and allow to cook a few minutes, just enough to handle them comfortably. Peel beets using a sharp paring knife, or have a little fun and just slip the skins off using your hands. (A very sensual kitchen experience!) Cold beets won’t peel easily, so be sure to do this while the beets are still warm. Slice beets into chunks. At this point you have the option of refrigerating the beets until you are ready to use them.

Heat the butter over medium heat in a large frying pan and add the ginger. Cook the ginger for a minute or two, just until it becomes fragrant. Add the beets and the balsamic and stir. When the beets are hot and glazed, test for sweetness. Add honey if needed and cook a little longer to glaze. Hint: Adding honey and upping the sweetness of this dish is a good way to introduce beets to the haters.

Remove from heat and serve hot. Alternatively, these beets are also really good served at room temperature as a salad.

BEET AND CABBAGE BORSCHT

1/2 cup dried cannellini or other other small white beans

3 large beets (about 2 lbs.)

2 Tbsp. olive oil, vegetable oil, or butter

1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

1/2 tsp. salt, plus more to taste

2 cloves garlic, minced (optional)

1small  head green, Savoy, or Napa cabbage, cored and thinly sliced or shredded

1  tsp. caraway seeds

4 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable broth

Lemon juice to taste

Plain yogurt or sour cream for garnish (optional)

Fresh chopped dill for garnish (optional)

Put the beans in a large pot and add cold water to cover generously. Bring to a boil, cover, turn off heat, and let sit 1 hour. Drain and return the beans to the pot. Cover again with cold water, bring to a boil, reduce heat to keep a simmer and cook until beans are tender to the bite, about 20 minutes. Drain the beans and set them aside.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F. Wrap the beets in a large sheet of foil, place on a baking sheet, and cook until tender when pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. Let the beets sit until cool enough to handle. Peel them (their skins should slip off easily after being roasted) and grate them on the large-hole side of a box grater. Set aside. (Note: I like the ease of peeling roasted beets, but feel free to peel and grate raw beets – they will cook quickly enough in the soup.)

In a large pot over medium-high heat add oil, onions, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, if using, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the cabbage, stir to combine, and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage wilts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the caraway seeds and beets. Stir to combine and add the broth or water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to maintain a steady simmer, add beans, and cook until vegetables are tender and flavors blend, 15 to 20 minutes.

Add salt and lemon juice to taste. Serve hot, with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream and a sprinkle of dill, if you like.

Makes 8 generous servings.

WARM BEETS AND GREENS (adapted from EATING WELL)

8 cups greens (chard, kale, collard, spinach, etc.) torn into pieces or sliced into ribbons

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 cup thinly sliced onion

2 plum tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons sliced Kalamata olives

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1 clove garlic, minced

2 cups steamed beet wedges, or slices, 1/2-1 inch thick

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

]

Place greens in a large bowl.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until starting to soften, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, olives, parsley and garlic and cook, stirring, until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 3 minutes. Add beets, vinegar, salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until the beets are heated through, about 1 minute more. Add the greens to the beet mixture toss over low heat until combined and greens wilt sightly. Serve warm.

ROASTED BEET, PEACH, and GOAT CHEESE SALAD (Allrecipes)

2 beets, scrubbed

1 bunch arugula, rinsed and dried; or a mixture of mesclun

2 fresh peaches – peeled, pitted, and sliced

2 shallots or one small sweet onion, chopped

1/4 cup pistachio nuts or toasted almonds, chopped

1 (4 ounce) package goat cheese, crumbled

1/4 cup walnut oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Wrap beets in foil, and place onto a baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven until the beets are tender. Allow the beets to cool slightly, then remove the skins. Let the beets cool to room temperature, or refrigerate until cold. Once cooled, thinly slice the beets.

Place the greens into a large mixing bowl. Add the sliced beets and peaches; sprinkle with the onions, nuts, and goat cheese. In a separate bowl, whisk together the walnut oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper until emulsified, and pour over the salad mixture. Toss well, and serve.

SPICY BEET, ONION, and WALNUT SALAD

Adapted from Jerusalem—and simplified.

About 1 cup cooked beets, cut into wedges

About 2 cups salad greens—arugula, lettuce, mache, watercress, etc.

1 small onion or leek, sliced into rings and lightly sauted

2 tablespoons of your favorite herbs—basil, parsley, cilantro

Dressing:

1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted (or other nuts)

2 tablespoons crushed garlic or garlicscape

¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes (more or less to taste)

¼ cup cider vinegar

3 tbs. oil—if you have walnut oil, mix 1 tbs walnut oil with 2 tbs olive oil.,

Toss the beets, greens, onions/leeks, and herbs. Mix the dressing ingredients and pour over the salad.

ROSH HASHANAH

Only a fraction of our members celebrate the Jewish New Year; but I think the recipes are useful—and I for one like to hear about other people’s traditions. If anyone has recipes from other cultures, please send them. Our CSA is very diverse—I once counted 16 nationalities among our members—and it would be nice to share.

Rosh Hashanah, for most, means sweet food. Symbolism is big in Jewish and sweet foods symbolize the desire for a sweet year. But it doesn’t stop with sweet. The Talmud, in a rare show of humor, established a series of puns involving food and suggested including them in Rosh Hashanah meals. For example—the word for “carrots” in Yiddish is mirren, which sound like the word for “increase.” So when you eat a dish with carrots, you say: May it be the will of god that our fortunes will increase in the New Year.” The wordplay involves beets, leeks, cabbage, carrots, apples, gourds/squash, dates, and fish heads, but there’s no reason not to create your own based on English rather than Hebrew or Yiddish words. There are recipes for beets (may our enemies be beaten) above; here is one for leeks and one for sweet peppers. And a recipe from stuffed cabbage (may the new year be stuffed with joy). And finally a tomatillo chicken soup, because . . . well, chicken soup is often served on Rosh Hashanah and we have a lot of tomatillos.

CHICKPEA & LEEK PANCAKES

3/4 cup chickpeas

1/4 cup leek

1 egg

bunch of cilantro

salt + pepper

Optional: You can add a tablespoon of flour if you prefer more of a ‘pancakey’ texture, I prefer them sans flour.

Chop the chickpeas, leek and cilantro

Combine all three into a bowl and stir in one whisked egg

Add salt + pepper (and the flour if you wish)

Add a small drizzle of your preferred oil to a fry pan and spoon tablespoon amounts into the pan (this recipe will make 5 or 6 fritters)

Cook each side until golden and serve with a squeeze of lemon or lime or even a bit of Greek yoghurt

PEPPERS WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS

2-3 peppers (any color; our big bell peppers count as 2); quartered or cut into lay-flat slices

2 tbs olive oil

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1 ounce slivered almonds

2 tbs honey

2 tbs sherry wine vinegar

2 tbs fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat broiler to high.

Place peppers skin side up in a single layer and broil for 5-10 minutes till charred. Remove to a paper bag to steam and cool. When cool enough remove skin and discard.  Slice into bite size pieces.

In a large pan, heat oil and add garlic for about 3 minutes add almond for 1 minute add honey and vinegar mixing in, Pour over peppers and garnish with parsley season with salt and pepper. Serve room temperature.

Halupkis: Stuffed Cabbage

2 large cabbage heads, coarse outer leaves removed

2 cups rice, uncooked

2 medium onions, diced

3 pounds ground lean beef

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, ground

2 teaspoons salt

4 eggs, beaten

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

1 (14.5 ounce) can tomato sauce (or fresh tomato sauce)

1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth (or fresh chicken soup)

1 can chopped tomatoes

1 chopped hot pepper—remove seeds to adjust heat

Remove the center core of each head of cabbage. Place in large pot of boiling water. Boil until soft, removing each leaf as it softens. Let leaves cool, then trim the thick rib on each leaf. Reserve 14.5 ounces of the cabbage cooking water.

Boil rice in a separate saucepot until half cooked. Drain and set aside.

In a bowl combine beef, partially cooked rice, pepper, salt, eggs, cooked onion-bacon mixture, paprika, and celery salt. Measure the mixture with medium sized ice-cream scoop to make each halupki the same size.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

On each separate cabbage leaf, place 1 scoop of the meat mixture at the bottom of the leaf and roll, tightly tucking the sides to cover the mixture. Line the bottom of a roasting pan (not aluminum) with cabbage leaves that are too dark or to small to use for rolling. Place halupkis in roasting pan, making 2 layers.

Combine tomato sauce, broth, chopped tomatoes, and reserved cooking liquid and pour over halupki. Cover and bake for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more liquid, if needed.

They taste best the next day.

SPICY CHICKEN AND TOMATILLO SOUP

From: What’s Cooking America

2 whole chicken breasts, boneless and skinless 1 pound tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and quartered 1 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced 1 Russet potato, peeled and quartered 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 to 2 fresh jalapeno chile peppers (stems and seeds removed) or according to your taste 4 cups chicken broth or stock 3 cups water Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste 1/4 cup sour cream (optional) 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Prepare Tomatillos: Remove the husks before using, the husks are inedible. Tomatillos are very easy to cook with because they don’t need to be peeled or seeded. Their texture is firm when raw, but soften when cooked. Rinse before using as the tomatillo is covered by a sticky substance. Do not peel the green skin.

In a large soup pot (or cast-iron Dutch oven) over medium heat, add chicken, onion, garlic, tomatillos, potato, oregano, chile pepper, chicken stock, and water; cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce head to low and simmer 20 to 30 minutes until chicken is tender and the meat falls from the bone. Remove chicken from the pot to a bowl or plate and set aside to cool (when cool, take meat from the bones and shred into pieces). Refrigerate cooked chicken until ready to use.

Remove the soup pot from the heat and let the vegetables and broth cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree the vegetable and broth in a blender or food processor.

When ready to serve, reheat the vegetable soup puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until hot. Adjust seasoning if necessary.

To serve, place a small pile of the shredded chicken into each soup bowl. Ladle the pureed soup around the pile of chicken in each bowl. Top each bowl of soup with sour cream and cilantro.

1/4 cup canola oil

1/2 teaspoon sugar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 (15-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained

Directions

Combine the first 6 ingredients in a bowl.

In a separate small bowl, whisk together the rice wine vinegar, canola oil, sugar, and salt and pepper.

Toss all together and let marinate for at up to 8 hours in the refrigerator before serving.



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