Jun
30
    
Posted (Lori) in News

CSA WEEK 4

Scroll down for the message from Stoneledge with the list of vegetables. Scroll down further for recipes

HAPPY JULY 4

After that long, cold winter and non-existent spring, we’re finally getting the warmth and sunshine we deserve. When the cold weather persisted so long into April and May, I was afraid our shares would be sparse for the first few weeks—but I’ve been amazed at how plentiful, beautiful, and delicious the early vegetables have been. And now we’re transitioning into the true summer vegetables. There’s still a lot of lettuce—enjoy it while you can, the heat will kill it very soon.

ANOTHER BABY BOY

Another kind of abundance—there have b een three baby boys born to members in the first few weeks of the season. Congratulations to the Bell-Wechslers—and to big sister Eliza—on the birth of Zachary!

ORDERING EXTRAS

Only about 15% of our members take advantage of the opportunity we have to order responsibly-grown products—meat, poultry, eggs, dairy, grains, honey, coffee, etc—from Stonelege Marketplace and Lewis Waite Farms. I don’t like to hard-sell—but this is really good stuff and it’s so hard to find it that I want to make sure you know that we order and get these products delivered right to our site:

For Stoneledge (honey, maple syrup, coffee, mushrooms): www.stoneledgefarmny.com.

Click on Marketplace and follow links

For Lewis Waite Farms (meat, poultry, eggs, dairy, grains, bread, and lots of other stuff):

http://csalewiswaitefarm.com/register?csa=15fba73d3cab68c3376ab3336deaba9f

THE SOUND OF LADLE

One of our members, Devi, has launched a wonderful new website/blog that focuses of fresh food. She’s using her share to create incredible recipes that we can all use.  I tried her kohlrabi-lentil soup—delicious and great for chilly summer night upstate. I’m looking forward to trying more of her recipes. You’ll find her blog here:

http://thesoundofladle.com/

If anyone else would like to share news or projects, I’m happy to post them—just send them to me.

MESSAGE FROM STONELEDGE

Dear CSA Member

Welcome Summer.  What a glorious first week.  Blue sky, breezy but warm.  As soon as we were finished transplanting Kale and Collards for this fall, rain.  From plant to animal we are all loving the weather.

The lettuces are still coming on strong and it will be another week of greens.  Romaine, Red Leaf and a Red Oak Leaf and are the lettuces this week.  The lettuces come in abundance and then they are suddenly gone until fall.  They do not grow well in the hot weather of July and August.  Fill your salad bowls and enjoy while they last.

The first of the Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage and Summer Squash. Early Jersey Wakefield is an Heirloom cabbage.  Small with a pointed top.  Very sweet tasting.

The first picking of Summer Squash is abundant.  The following weeks will probably not be such a heavy load but we are sending a generous share with the first picking.  There are five different varieties of Summer Squash that we grow and you will receive a mix of what has been picked over the season.  You should look for: Sunburst is a flat, patty pan, a couple of different green Zucchini varieties but we will call them all Zucchini.  Golden Glory which is a gold Zucchini, Romanesco, a striped Zucchini looking squash and finally Zephyr which is a bi-colored summer squash.  Yellow on the top, green on the bottom.  They are all delicious.

To top off the week, Sugar Snap Peas.  These are edible pod peas so snap the stem, pull off the string and eat the entire pod.  A treat that only comes once a year.

Marketplace orders of Organic Fair trade Coffee, Organic Dark Chocolate, local Honey and Maple Syrup will be delivered weekly.  To order just log into your CSA Member account and select Marketplace.  You can also order Mushrooms in bulk from the Marketplace.  Mushroom orders must be received by Friday at 6.

Enjoy the vegetables.

Deborah for everyone at Stoneledge Farm

Red Tide Lettuce-1 head

Romaine Lettuce-1 head

Red Oak Leaf Lettuce-1 head

Bright Lights Swiss Chard-1 bunch

Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage-1 head

Garlic Scapes-4

Summer Squash-5

Sugar Snap Peas-1 pound

Mushroom Share-Oyster

Mushrooms from the Bulich Mushroom Company, Catskill

Stoneledge Farm LLC

info@stoneledge.farm

www.stoneledge.farm

359 Ross Ruland Road

South Cairo, NY  12482

RECIPES

This week’s vegetables need very little instruction or preparation. And since it is going to be a hot week, you probably won’t want to spend much time cooking in a hot kitchen. I’ve included a few recipes for cabbage and squash. There’s no reason to do anything with the snap peas except pull off the string and pop them in your mouth.

You’ll find lots of recipes for squash and cabbage in Recipes from America’s Small Farms—there’s a batch of cole slaws recipes on page 73, and the Greek Zucchini Cakes on page 151 is one of my favorite recipes.

SUMMER SQUASH RIBBONS
Serves 4

1 1/2 pounds zucchini, yellow, or zephyr squash
1 shallot, very thinly sliced (about 2 tablespoons)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup chiffonade of basil
1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
2 ounces goat cheese

Trim the ends off the squash and, using a mandoline, vegetable peeler, or knife, cut the squash lengthwise into very thin strips.

Place in a large bowl with the sliced shallot, olive oil, and vinegar, and gently toss to combine. Let stand for 10 minutes.

Season to taste with salt and pepper. Then add the basil and pine nuts and gently toss to combine.

Transfer to a serving dish(es) and crumble goat cheese on top. Serve immediately.

SUMMER SQUASH ANGEL HAIR
Serves 2

4 ounces angel hair pasta
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 small onion
2 garlic cloves, pressed
2 medium summer squash or zucchini, grated
salt
pepper
pinch cayenne pepper
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Bring a large pot of water to the boil.

Meanwhile, melt the butter in a medium saucepan. Add the onion and cook, stirring, until the onion is translucent, 5-10 minutes. Put in the pinch of cayenne pepper and of salt, then add the grated zucchini and the garlic and cook over medium heat until reduced, about 8 minutes. Sprinkle with pepper and a little more salt and turn the heat to low.

When the water is boiling, add a teaspoon of salt and the angel hair and cook according to package directions (angel hair cooks quite quickly – it will take only 2-3 minutes). Drain, reserving 1/3 cup of pasta water.

Add the angel hair and pasta water to the summer squash and turn the heat to high. Let the whole thing reduce, then scoop into a serving bowl and sprinkle with the cheese. Serve immediately.

SUSPICIOUSLY DELICIOUS CABBAGE

Serves 2-4

2 tbsp butter

1 medium onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced (or 1 finely choppe garlicscape)

1 heaped tbsp grated fresh ginger

1 medium green cabbage, cored and thinly sliced

3/4 cup heavy cream (or less, half-and-half also works)

Salt and black pepper to taste

1 In a very large pan, heat the butter over a medium heat until it is melted and starting to bubble a little. Stir in the onion and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes, until softened.

2 Stir in the ginger and cook for about a minute. Then, add the cabbage, stirring well to coat it with the butter and other flavors. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 15-20 minutes, until the cabbage is soft and caramelised.

3 Turn the heat down to low and stir in the cream, making sure to scrape any browned bits up from the pan bottom. Cover and continue to cook over a low heat for about 10 minutes. Uncover, add salt and pepper to taste. Then cook for a few more minutes, stirring once or twice, to let some of the liquid evaporate. Adjust the seasonings as desired and serve.

OVEN-ROASTED GARLIC CABBAGE; from the PALEO COOKBOOK)

SERVES: 4

1 green cabbage, cut into 1? thick slices;

3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil or melted ghee;

5 large garlic cloves, minced; or 3 tbs minced garlicscape

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat your oven to 400 F.

Brush both sides of each cabbage slice with the olive oil or ghee.

Spread the garlic evenly on each side of the cabbage slices, and season them to taste with salt and pepper.

Roast in your oven for 20 minutes; then turn the slices over and roast them again for another 20 minutes or until the edges are crispy.


 
Jun
30
    
Posted (Lori) in News

HOW TO TURN A HEAD OF LETTUCE INTO A MAIN DISH

I’m sure everyone knows how to make a salad, but in the coming weeks we’re going to be inundated with lettuces and greens and pretty little side salads are not going to be enough to use them up. Over the years, I’ve come up with ways to use my lettuce, with just a few extra ingredients, as a main dish. To call it a main dish, I need it to:

–Supply me with a reasonable amount of protein. I’m not a nutritionist—and if any of our nutritionist-members want to correct me, please do—but from what I’ve read, I think I need about 45 grams of protein a day. Spread over three to five small meals a day, my main dish salad has to have 10-15 grams of protein in it. The three cups of torn lettuce in my salad supply about 2.5 grams of protein, so I need at least 8, and up to 12 or 13 more grams of protein. The amounts of protein listed below are rough averages.

–Taste good.  The lettuces we get in our CSA shares are tastier than average—but I still need more taste and texture to make me happy.

–Fill me up. A bowl of lettuce is not going to keep me going until the next meal; I need to add something more filling.

Here are some of the things I add to my 3 cups of chopped or torn greens (I use lettuce, sometimes greens like mizuna or mustard greens, spinach or arugula when we get it, and herbs.

Beans and peas: lot of protein—average is about 8 grams per half cup. My favorite is the chickpea. Soybeans have the most, 14 grams in a half-cup. Agata & Valentina sells roasted soybeans that are crunchy and delicious.

Nuts and seeds: again, protein-packed. Almonds have 7 grams of protein in one-quarter of a cup. Toasting them for just a minute makes them taste even better.

Cheese—crumbled feta or chevre, shaved parmesan or dry jack, chunks of cheddar, shredded mozzarella—or any of the many interesting and yummy cheeses available through Lewis Waite Farms or in local stores. Cheeses average 7 grams per ounce.

Tofu—absorbs salad dressings, sort of like manna. And has lots of protein.

Animal protein—for non-vegetarians, just an ounce or two of grilled, roasted, or any other preparation of meat, poultry, or fish. Flaked salmon and strips of grilled chicken are two of the easiest additions. Leftover coldcuts—smoked turkey, roast beef, and ham, for example—are also easy and get rid of little bits of food that might otherwise go to waste. Leftover barbecued chicken or spicy sausage add strong flavor as well as protein. Chopped or sliced hardboiled eggs are also good.

Grains—A half-cup of carbs often makes the difference between hunger and satisfaction. Rice, quinoa, couscous, pasta, as well as lesser-known grains like faro, wheatberries, barley (look at Lewis Waite’s grain list for other choices)—are both interesting and filling.

Other vegetables and fruits—Tomatoes, of course, though they are usually not in our shares the same weeks as lettuce. But any raw or cooked vegetables go a long way in making a salad a main dish. Fruits—dried, cooked, or fresh—are also nice.

Salty things—olives, capers, and anchovies add a unique flavor

Dressings—You’ll find a nice batch of dressing in Recipes from America’s Small Farms, on pages 54-55 as well as throughout the book. Dressings add interesting flavors, and if they’re full of dairy (buttermilk, bleu cheese or protein-based ingredients (such as tahini or peanut butter), they also contribute significant protein.

YORKVLLE CSA

WEEK ONE RECIPES AND TIPS:

I just noticed that the previous email’s subject line reads CSA starts tonight; it’s really today, 4 pm.

Here are recipes and tips for this week’s vegetables. Most of it is picked up from last year—sorry, busy week for me. I’ll do more for next week—but if anyone has recipes that they want to share, please send them. And if anyone want to take a turn at creating the recipe page, just let me know. I find that it’s a fun job (when I’m not swamped with other work) and no one tries to edit every word I put down (so different from my day job!).

There are a lot more recipes on the Stoneledge website, www.stoneledgefarmny.com

HOW TO TURN A HEAD OF LETTUCE INTO A MAIN DISH

I’m sure everyone knows how to make a salad, but in the coming weeks we’re going to be inundated with lettuces and greens and pretty little side salads are not going to be enough to use them up. Over the years, I’ve come up with ways to use my lettuce, with just a few extra ingredients, as a main dish. To call it a main dish, I need it to:

–Supply me with a reasonable amount of protein. I’m not a nutritionist—and if any of our nutritionist-members want to correct me, please do—but from what I’ve read, I think I need about 45 grams of protein a day. Spread over three to five small meals a day, my main dish salad has to have 10-15 grams of protein in it. The three cups of torn lettuce in my salad supply about 2.5 grams of protein, so I need at least 8, and up to 12 or 13 more grams of protein. The amounts of protein listed below are rough averages.

–Taste good.  The lettuces we get in our CSA shares are tastier than average—but I still need more taste and texture to make me happy.

–Fill me up. A bowl of lettuce is not going to keep me going until the next meal; I need to add something more filling.

Here are some of the things I add to my 3 cups of chopped or torn greens (I use lettuce, sometimes greens like mizuna or mustard greens, spinach or arugula when we get it, and herbs.

Beans and peas: lot of protein—average is about 8 grams per half cup. My favorite is the chickpea. Soybeans have the most, 14 grams in a half-cup. Agata & Valentina sells roasted soybeans that are crunchy and delicious.

Nuts and seeds: again, protein-packed. Almonds have 7 grams of protein in one-quarter of a cup. Toasting them for just a minute makes them taste even better.

Cheese—crumbled feta or chevre, shaved parmesan or dry jack, chunks of cheddar, shredded mozzarella—or any of the many interesting and yummy cheeses available through Lewis Waite Farms or in local stores. Cheeses average 7 grams per ounce.

Tofu—absorbs salad dressings, sort of like manna. And has lots of protein.

Animal protein—for non-vegetarians, just an ounce or two of grilled, roasted, or any other preparation of meat, poultry, or fish. Flaked salmon and strips of grilled chicken are two of the easiest additions. Leftover coldcuts—smoked turkey, roast beef, and ham, for example—are also easy and get rid of little bits of food that might otherwise go to waste. Leftover barbecued chicken or spicy sausage add strong flavor as well as protein. Chopped or sliced hardboiled eggs are also good.

Grains—A half-cup of carbs often makes the difference between hunger and satisfaction. Rice, quinoa, couscous, pasta, as well as lesser-known grains like faro, wheatberries, barley (look at Lewis Waite’s grain list for other choices)—are both interesting and filling.

Other vegetables and fruits—Tomatoes, of course, though they are usually not in our shares the same weeks as lettuce. But any raw or cooked vegetables go a long way in making a salad a main dish. Fruits—dried, cooked, or fresh—are also nice.

Salty things—olives, capers, and anchovies add a unique flavor

Dressings—You’ll find a nice batch of dressing in Recipes from America’s Small Farms, on pages 54-55 as well as throughout the book. Dressings add interesting flavors, and if they’re full of dairy (buttermilk, bleu cheese or protein-based ingredients (such as tahini or peanut butter), they also contribute significant protein.

KOHLRABI

We’re getting kohlrabi in our shares this week; it’s a lesser-known vegetable and one that looks like it  came from another planet. Debbie describes some uses in her message below, but I find that its best role is as a crudite. Just peel, slice and then dip, dunk, or spread. It’s crisp, holds its shape, and doesn’t have a strong taste of its own. If you want more elaborate recipes, there is a bunch of them here:
1. Sliced thin and eaten raw. When raw, kohlrabi is slightly crunchy and mildly spicy, like radishes. You can toss them in a salad or eat them on their own with a drizzle of good olive oil and a sprinkling of sea salt.

2. Made into fritters. This is a great way to get kids to eat their kohlrabi! Shred the vegetable and mix with an egg and a few tablespoons of flour. Heat oil or butter in a flat skillet, drop on small mounds, and flatten slightly with the back of your spatula. Turn after a few minutes, and serve when both sides are crispy.

3. In soup. We particularly like kohlrabi in a creamy, pureed soup with mild spices so that sweet kohlrabi flavor can really shine through. Also, try adding it to recipes for Cream of Potato, Cream of Broccoli, and even Cream of Mushroom soup!

4. Roasted. When roasted in the oven, the outside of the kohlrabi caramelizes, and the flavor sweetens and mellows. You can slice the kohlrabi thin for toasted “chips” or cube it. We like to toss it with other roasted veggies like eggplant and potatoes for a hearty side dish.

5. Steamed. This is kind of a cheat-suggestion because kohrabi can be used in literally anything once steamed. We throw steamed kohlrabi into frittatas, stir-fries, and pasta dishes. We also like to puree it with a little cream and simple spices. We’ve also seen recipes for stuffing steamed kohlrabi into empanadas and calzones!

SAUTEED GREENS–and five ways to use it

Any of the greens we’re receiving—kale, Chinese cabbage, mustard greens—can be used in the following recipes

1 1/2 tablespoons butter

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 pinch dry crushed red pepper

2 bunches greens, stems trimmed, leaves cut into 1/2-inch-wide pieces

1/2 lemon, juice of

salt

Melt butter and oil in heavy large pan over medium-low heat. Add garlic and crushed red pepper. Sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute.

Add greens; stir to coat. Cover and cook until tender (stirring occasionally) about 8 minutes. Squeeze juice from 1/2 lemon onto greens. Season to taste with salt.

Using Sautéed Greens:

1. Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms: Clean 2 portobellos and remove stems. Broil for about 1 minute; remove from oven. Pack the portobello caps with the prepared greens. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese and bread crumbs. Return to oven and broil for about 2 minutes. Cut in half or in quarters.

2. Greens with quick-cooking grains. For a main dish, mix the greens with grains that cook in under ten minutes

–Bulgur: Combine one part bulgar with three parts water. Bring to a boil; boil for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, cover; let stand for 4 minutes; drain excess water.

–Angel-hair pasta, pastina, or orzo—these cook in 3-5 minutes. Combine with greens and parmesan

–Israeli couscous cooks in about ten minutes

3. Beans and greens: I usually prefer cooking dried beans—but when it’s so hot, canned beans are easier. Chick peas, kidney beans, and cannellini are all great with greens. Drain the beans and rinse thoroughly to get out the “can” taste. Toss with the prepared greens.

4. Greens and tofu. Toss the finished greens with cubes of tofu.

5. Greens and meat. Toss the finished greens with strips of broiled chicken or beef

GREENS WITH TAHINI, YOGURT, and BUTTERED PINE NUTS (or ALMONDS)

Adapted from Jerusalem, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi

1 lg bunch greens

2 ½ tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons olive oil (plus extra to finish)

About 3 tablespoons pine nuts (or, substitute slivered or blanched almonds because pine nuts are just too expensive)

2 small cloves garlic, sliced thinly (or a tablespoon of thinly sliced garlicscape)

¼ cup dry white wine, stock, or water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Sweet paprika as garnish (optional)

Remove the stems from leaves—this is the part that takes the most time. Then chop leaves and stems separately. Steam or boil the chopped stems for about 2-3 minutes; then add the leaves and steam or boil about 1 minutes more. Drain and, when cool, squeeze out all the water. The greens should be quite dry.

While the greens are cooking, heat 1 tbs butter and 2 tbs oil in a large frying pan. Add the nuts and toss for about two minutes, until they begin to brown—be careful; they will burn very soon after they start to color. Remove them from the pan with a slotted spoon and reserve. Add the garlic and sauté for about a minute. Add the wine, stock, or water and cook for about 1 minute. Return the greens to the pan, add the last tablespoon of buRECItter and stir for 2-3 minutes until it is combined with the garlic and warmed through.

Divide the greens among 4 plates; spoon the tahini-yogurt sauce over it and sprinkle with the nuts. Drizzle with olive oil and paprika.

Tahini-yogurt sauce:

4 tbs tahini paste

4 tbs Greek yogurt (see note)

2 tbs freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 clove garlic, crushed (or 2 tsp chopped garlicscape)

2 tbs water

Put all the ingredients in a bowl and mix with a whisk until you get a smooth paste.

NOTE: If you have plain yogurt, it can be turned into Greek yogurt in a couple of hours. Put yogurt in a sieve lined with a coffee filter, placed over a bowl (or, attach the coffee filter to the top of an empty yogurt container with a rubber band. Cover, and leave in the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight; the liquid will drain from the yogurt, leaving a thicker, creamier, Greek-style yogurt.

FUSILLI WITH GREENS—submitted by Luce, who notes that it is

very versatile and open to personal twists!

3/4 pound whole-wheat fusilli

3/4 pound mustard greens/mizuna, chopped and rinsed (or any other greens: escarole works great too, as does chard)

1/3 cup pine nuts (optional)

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 sliced garlic cloves

1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes

1/3 cup dried currants

4 Italian sausages (two sweet, two hot works well)

Freshly shredded parmesan cheese

1. Broil the sausages, and slice.

2. Cook pasta as package directs.

3. If using, toast pine nuts in a large, dry frying pan over medium heat; set

aside.

4. Add oil to pan, then add garlic, chili flakes and currants. Cook, stirring,

until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the greens. Cook until greens are tender.

5. Stir in drained pasta, sausages and reserved pine nuts. Serve with cheese.

CHINESE CABBAGE SALAD

From: How Stuff Works, by the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

This is a great make-ahead dish: as it refrigerates overnight, the cabbage softens slightly and the tangy flavors blend even more. Try a crisp Asian pear or juicy seedless red grapes in place of the apple.

6 tablespoons cider vinegar

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon dark sesame oil

1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger

1 large crisp red apple, diced

1 medium (1 to 1-1/4 pounds) head Chinese cabbage

1/3 cup golden raisins

2 green onions, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

PREPARATION:

Combine vinegar, sugar, oil and ginger in large bowl; stir until sugar dissolves. Stir in apple.

Add cabbage, raisins, onions, cilantro and sesame seeds; gently stir until well combined.

Note

Store cabbage tightly wrapped in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. A one-pound cabbage will yield about 4 cups shredded cabbage.

PICKLED CHINESE CABBAGE—submitted by Lee’at

1 head Napa or Chinese cabbage (this works with plain cabbage as well)

5-6 slices of fresh ginger

5 oz. (1/2 cup + 2 tbsps) sugar

1 tbsp + 1 tsp salt

1 cup rice wine vinegar

2 cups water

1 carrot, peeled and cut into slivers

1/2 red bell pepper, cut into slivers (optional – I just added them for color)

1 tbsp Sichuan peppercorns

6-12 dried red chili peppers (depending on how spicy you want it)

Lop off the base of the head of Napa cabbage. Separate the leaves and wash them. Shake off excess water and blot with a towel. Stack several leaves together in the same orientation and cut a couple of 1-inch sections (the tougher white parts) – don’t throw them out, you’ll want to keep it all. Then slice the remaining leafy section lengthwise. Repeat with all of the leaves. The smaller leaves can be left whole. In a small saucepan, heat the ginger, sugar, salt, rice wine vinegar, and water. Stir until the sugar and salt are dissolved. When the mixture comes to a boil, remove from heat. In a large glass jar, layer the cabbage, carrots, bell pepper (if using), Sichuan peppercorns, and red chili peppers. Pour the pickling liquid (including the ginger) into the jar. Cover the jar tightly. Give it a shake. Place in refrigerator. Don’t worry if the liquid doesn’t cover all of the cabbage, over time the cabbage will wilt and settle into the liquid. Refrigerate for at least a day, but I prefer at least three days.


 
Jun
23
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Hi, All:

I’m not in the city week. The share sounds great—spring turnips! Swiss chard! garlicscapes!. Scroll down for the list from Stoneledge. I’m pasting a recipe/tip sheet below and will post on the website. Our website: www.chysca.org

CONGRATULATIONS:

In the week before our first delivery, two new members joined us. Congratulations to the Peleds on the birth of their baby boy and to the Metzger-Chafts (and big sister Allissandra) on the birth of Cooper.

And congratulations to Naima Waxman-Drecker on her graduation from high school. Naima has been a CSA member since our very first year, when she came to pickups in a snuggli. When I can’t remember how long we’ve been a CSA, I ask Naima how old she is. Now I feel that our CSA is ready for college.

BAGS

Thank you for bringing all those bags. Now, please stop. We have enough bags to supply a small supermarket. I’ll let you know when we run out. Meanwhile, please do bring bags for your own share.

SPRAYING

During these hot weeks, it’s hard to keep the vegetables looking fresh. There are spray bottles on the tables; our site managers spray as much as they can, but please help out by spritzing as you pack.

MESSAGE FROM STONELEDGE

Week #3

Dear CSA Member

This is the busiest time of year on the farm.  The harvest is now well underway, transplanting seedlings for fall, tending the small plants in the greenhouses, weeds and insects loving the cool, wet weather we have been having and then once newly transplanted seedlings are planted there is irrigating.   It is hard to keep up with all that needs to be done day to day.  It is also a wonderful time of year when months of work is ready for harvest.

This is salad season.  It comes and goes quickly so enjoy the greens of spring.  The Romaine can be grilled, Lettuce Soup recipe is on the farm website and if you are invited to dinner or a party, volunteer to bring the salad!  This week the lettuces are beautiful.  The lettuce is mature but still sweet and tender.  There are four different varieties: Romaine, Red Tide, Red Sails and Buttercrunch.  New this season is a Frisee Endive that is also a great addition to the fresh salad.    Red Tide is a smaller, redder lettuce.  Red Sails larger and very tender so handle carefully.

For the first time this season Bright Lights Swiss Chard and Summer Spinach.  Beautiful multicolored stems of yellow, reds, oranges adorn the Bright Lights Swiss Chard.

Garlic Scapes are the green pig tail looking stem.  The scape is the immature seed head of the garlic plant that is removed to send more growing energy to the bulb below the soil.  The scape grows from the center of the above ground portion of the plant.  Scapes have the same flavor and use as the garlic bulb.  Delicious Garlic Scape Pesto is easy to make.  The recipe can be found on the farm Recipe section or use your favorite pesto recipe substituting the scape for basil.

Marketplace items Honey, Maple, Coffee, Organic Dark Chocolate can be ordered any time during the season and will be delivered with your CSA shares.  The Organic Dark Chocolate is delicious.

Enjoy the Vegetables

Deborah for everyone at Stoneledge Farm

Red Tide Lettuce-1 head

Red Sail Lettuce-1 head

Frisee Endive-1 head

Romaine Lettuce-1 head

Buttercrunch Lettuce-1 head

Bright Lights Swiss Chard-1 bunch

Garlic Scapes-4

Spring Turnips with greens-1 bunch

Summer Spinach-1 bunch

Mushroom Share-Crimini

Stoneledge Farm LLC

info@stoneledge.farm

www.stoneledge.farm

359 Ross Ruland Road

South Cairo, NY  12482

RECIPES/TIPS

Four main ingredients in this week’s share: Lots of lettuce—4 heads plus summer spinach and frisee–since lettuce can’t be preserved in any useful way, I’ve looked for ways to use lots of it. Lots of greens: Swiss chard, turnip greens, summer spinach, frisee can all be cooked as greens—which stir-fry easily and freeze beautifully. Spring turnips, for the first time in years—great raw or lightly cooked. And garlicscapes, a favorite of people who have been with CSAs for a while and a soon-to-be-favorite for new members

LETTUCE

With four heads of lettuce in our share this week—plus summer spinach and frisee to add stronger tastes—it’s time to go beyond salads to use it up. For salads, see “How to turn a head of lettuce into a full meal” on the website.

LETTUCE SANDWICHES

(By the way—this idea comes from member Dick Sandhaus’ Better, Cheaper, Slower blog; if you don’t know it, http://www.bettercheaperslower.com/cgi-bin/iowa/home/index.html ) One of the best, most useful blogs on the web) Dick supplies even more ideas for lettuce sandwiches.

Piled high between two slices of bread, slathered with dressing (on the bread and between the leaves), with sliced turnips or radishes for crunch—there’s no need for meat or tuna salad to make a great sandwich. The trick is get the lettuce completely dry, unless you like soggy. The dressing can be a simple vinaigrette, a strong bleu cheese, or anything in between. I prefer drier dressings (because I hate soggy), but there is something to be said for the dressing soaking into the bread. Lettuce is also great in wraps, with or without other ingredients.

WILTED LETTUCE SALAD: From Cooks.com

Many wilted salad recipes use bacon; this one doesn’t.

2-3 heads leaf lettuce (Romaine, red leaf, etc.)

salt and pepper, to taste

1/4 to 1/2 cup vinegar (balsamic works best)

1/4 to 1/2 cup water

1 tablespoon to 1/4 cup sugar

3 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 cup finely chopped white or red onions

2 drops/splashes liquid smoke (optional)

Separate lettuce leaves, rinsing as you do so. Submerge all leaves into water to be sure they are clean. Sand and Dirt are not good seasonings. Dry lettuce leaves – spin, pat let drain – whatever works for you. Cut off the white parts and any bad spots. Then ribbon or chop leaves and place into a large glass bowl.

Combine vinegar, water and sugar and mix together in a bowl..

In a fry pan, heat the olive oil over medium high to high heat and then add the onions. Saute until the onions begin to crisp.

While the onions are crisping, sprinkle salt and pepper to taste onto the lettuce and toss. When the onions are should crisp and brown, but not burned, pour in the vinegar mixture and stir together.

Bring to a boil (about 2 minutes top). Remove from heat. If you are going to use the liquid smoke now is the time to add it.

Pour liquid over the lettuce and toss. Serve hot or cold.

GREENS

You’ll find lots of information about how to prepare, store and preserve greens on our website, on Stoneledge’s website, and in Recipes from America’s Small Farms. But I want to remind you—greens freeze very well. I usually have about a dozen small baggies of frozen greens in my freezer when the CSA season is over, and I take them out one by one over the winter. Just chop, throw in boiling and drain completely. Press out all the water, flatten them out and put them in a ziplock. They don’t take up much room—my freezer is tiny—but they are much appreciated when I turn them into quiches, frittatas, and spinach dips in the winter.

SPICY, NUTTY, CREAMY GREENS

Butter &/or olive oil about 3 tbs total

1 tbs chopped garlic or garlicscape

1 small onion, chopped

1 small chili pepper,diced—remove most of the seeds unless you like it very hot– or ¼ tsp ground cayenne pepper

¼ lb sliced mushrooms (optional)

About 6 cups (2 bunches) mixed greens

2 tbs toasted chopped nuts—blanched almonds, pecans, peanuts, or any other nuts; pine nuts are best, but are just too expensive. Sunflower seeds are good, too.

¼ cup sour cream

¼ cup grated cheese

Salt to taste

Heat the butter/oil in a large, heavy frying pan. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until soft. Add the chili pepper and mushrooms and sauté until they are softened; toss over high heat until most of the liquid evaporates. Add the greens; toss until totally wilted. Add the nuts and toss again. Fold in the cream and cheese and stir until combined. Add salt to taste. Serve as a side dish or over pasta or rice.

GREENS AND BEANS

5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced, or one chopped garlicscape

1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper

1 large bunch greens (such as spinach, turnip greens, frisse, chard; about 1 pound), thick stems removed, spinach left whole, other greens cut into 1-inch strips (about 10 cups packed)

1 cup (or more) vegetable broth or low-salt chicken broth

1 15-ounce can cannellini (white kidney beans), rinsed, drained1 teaspoon (or more) Sherry wine vinegar

Heat 4 tablespoons oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and dried crushed pepper; stir until garlic is pale golden, about 1 minute. Add greens by large handfuls; stir just until beginning to wilt before adding more, tossing with tongs to coat with oil.

Add 1 cup broth, cover, and simmer until greens are just tender, adding more broth by tablespoonfuls if dry, 1 to 10 minutes, depending on type of greens. Add beans; simmer uncovered until beans are heated through and liquid is almost absorbed, about 2 minutes. Stir in 1 teaspoon vinegar. Season with salt and pepper, and more vinegar if desired; drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon oil and serve.

Per serving: 269 calories, 18g fat (3g saturated), 0mg cholesterol, 111mg sodium, 21g carbohydrates, 6g fiber, 10g protein

SPRING TURNIPS

We haven’t had turnips for a few years, and I’ve misse them. Many members asked for them in our survey, so the Kavakoses made a special effort to keep them strong—they’ve planted them in previous years, but they didn’t survive spring frosts—and here they are. These are not like the huge, hearty turnips we had in the fall; they are great raw and need very little cooking. Sometimes, the first harvest of turnips gives us mostly green and very tiny turnips, so we might not have turnips that are big enough use as below—if they’re tiny, just wash, slice, and throw them into a stir fry/

Basics: Peeling really isn’t necessary, just wash them well. These tender little turnips are great raw; just halve or quarter them,.sprinkle with salt and enjoy. Raw turnips are great in salads, as crudités, and layered into sandwiches.

If you’re stir-frying greens, these make a great addition. They need only a few minutes, so add them just a miute before the greens.

If the turnips are big enough, they can be roaste or broiled. Slice them about ¼-inch thick, drizzle with oil, and put them in a 350 degree oven for about 15-20 minutes or under a broiler for about 5 minutes. Turn once halfway through. Watch them while they are roasting/broiling—they are sometimes ready way before the times above and they burn easily.

There’s a great turnip soup recipe in Recipes From America’s Small Farms. Here are a few more spring turnip recipes from the More Than Burnt Toast blog.

Spiced Spring Turnips & Greens

½ lb spring turnip greens

1 tbs vegetable oil

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 small red chilli, split lengthways

1-inch piece root ginger, peeled and grated

1 tbs chopped garlicscape

½ lb small turnips, trimmed, and quartered—peel them if you want

salt, to taste

a pinch of turmeric or your favorite spice

Finely slice the spring turnip greens and wash them thoroughly – this isn’t just to remove any grit, but also because, as there’s no liquid added to this dish, the water clinging to the leaves will ensure that the greens cook quickly and evenly. Heat the oil in a large lidded pan and add the cumin seeds. When they begin to pop, reduce the heat and add the chili, ginger and garlic. Add the turnips, salt and turmeric, cover the pan with a lid and cook for ten minutes. Add the spring greens and cook, covered, for a further ten minutes, stirring occasionally, until they are tender but still brightly coloured and slightly crunchy. Serve hot as a side dish, removing the chili before serving if you wish.

Spring Turnips with Honey-Mustard Dressing

½ lb baby turnips, trimmed

1 tbs vinegar

1 tsp clear honey

1/2 tsp mustard powder

1 tbs olive oil

1 tbs chopped flat-leaf parsley

1 tbs shredded fresh mint (optional)

salt and fresh ground black pepper

Place the turnips in a saucepan, cover generously with water and add a little salt. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat under the pan and simmer for 8-10 minutes or until the turnips are just tender.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the vinegar, honey and mustard powder, and a generous sprinkling of salt and pepper. Whisk briefly until smooth and set aside. Drain the turnips thoroughly in a colander. In a small frying pan, heat the olive oil. Add the turnips and turn them in the oil for a few minutes until beginning to turn light golden. Add the vinegar-honey mixture and stir until the turnips are well coated and the glaze begins to bubble in the pan. Add the fresh herbs, stir to distribute them evenly, then turn the turnips and glaze onto a serving dish and serve immediately.

GREAT SCAPES

Eighteen years ago, when I first joined CSA, I threw away my garlic scalpes. They didn’t fit anywhere in the refrigerator and sprang out when I opened the door. I had no idea what to do with them. When I learned how to use them, I became a fan, as did many other members; scapes are now are an eagerly-awaited favorite.

I’ve included a list of “things to do with garlic scapes” but basically—just chop them up and use them like garlic. I find that they’re easier to use—no paper to peel—and give a milder, though still deep—garlic taste. A long scape goes a long way once it’s chopped and scapes last for a long time. Just roll them up and put them in the crisper drawer in a plastic bag to keep them all together. They can frozen, but I find that they last so long that I use them up before they go bad.

THINGS TO DO WITH GARLIC SCAPES

SCAPEY WHITE SAUCE

3 tablespoons butter

3 tablespoons chopped garlicscape (about 1 long scape0

3 tablespoons flour

3 cups milk, heated until almost—but not—boiling; 3 minutes in microwave

Salt, pepper to taste; grated nutmeg if you have it.

Melt the butter in a saucepan; add the garlicscape and sauté until soft, about 2 minutes. Add the flour and whisk until combine; it should be thick. Whisk for another two minutes. Then pour in the hot milk—carefully—and whisk stir until fully combined. Keep stirring until the sauce thickens, about 3-5 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, nutmeg and any other herbs.

This is great with greens, turnips, potatoes, pasta.

GARLIC MAYONNAISE

Add a teaspoon to a tablespoon of finely chopped garlicscape to 2 tablespoons or mayonnaise, or mayonnaise/horseradish sauce combination. Makes a super sandwich spread.

SAUTED SCAPES

When we have a lot scapes—not this week—saute them, cut into manageable lengths—in butter and/or olive oil until they are browned and soft. I don’t think they work as a side dish on their own, but mixe with other broiled, roasted, or sautéed vegetables, they add a great taste. And layering a length of sautéed scape into a sandwich adds a wonderful texture and flavor.

GARLIC BREAD

Chop a scape into small pieces—or whirl it a food processor—and combine with soft butter; add some chopped herbs. Spread it on bread and warm the bread in the oven for a minute or two.

GARLIC SCAPE SOUP

From Super Natural Cooking, by Heidi Swanson

2 tablespoons clarified butter or extra-virgin olive oil

2 dozen garlic scapes, flower buds discarded and green shoots chopped

3 large russet potatoes, unpeeled and cut into ½ inch dice

5 cups vegetable stock or water

2 large handfuls spinach leaves, stemmed

Juice of ½ lemon

½ teaspoon fine-grain sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup heavy cream (optional)

Chive blossoms, for garnish (optional)

Heat the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat, then add the scapes and sauté for 2 minutes.

Add the potatoes and stock, cover, and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are cooked through and beginning to break down.

Remove from the heat, add the spinach, and puree using a hand blender. (If you must use a conventional blender, be careful; the hot liquid can burst out the top and make a huge, potentially painful mess. Try leaving the lid slightly ajar to allow steam to escape. Cover the top with a kitchen towel and blend in batches at low speed.)

Season with the lemon juice, salt, and a few grinds of pepper.

Whisk in the cream for a silkier texture.

If the soup tastes flat, add salt a few big pinches at a time until the flavors really pop.

Serve garnished with the chive blossoms.

Serves 4 to 6.