Nov
12
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Dear CSA Member,
Boy is it cold.  There was even snow this afternoon although it was  short lived.  There is one more delivery after this week in the 2013 CSA season.  As our delivery season comes to an end we are already working on the 2014 season.  Seeds will be ordered, fertilizer, potting soil, the list goes on and on.  We are very busy right into the heart of winter.  There is a list of winter chores that grows each day.
I hope to have the registration open during the next couple of weeks.  The programmers have been upgrading the system to make improvements and all of the testing should be completed soon.  I will send an e-mail message once registration is opened for the 2014 season.
New this week is Celeriac.  A root crop that has a rough exterior but a delicious interior.  Peel the skin and use as you would celery in soups and stews.  The Celeriac will impart a wonderful celery like flavor.  There are also salad recipes using Celeriac on the farm website Recipe section.
If you would like to stock up for the winter there are potatoes, beets and carrots available in bulk through the online Marketplace.  There is still a good supply of coffee through the Marketplace as well.
Make a big pot of soup and keep warm!
Deborah for everyone at Stoneledge Farm
Potatoes-2 pounds
Orange Carrots-1 pound
Yellow Carrots-1 pound.  These are thinner than the orange carrots and should be used more as you would a parsnip.  They will add a very nice flavor to soups and stews.  Kohlrabi-2
Sage-1 bunch
Garlic-2 heads
Celeriac-1 head
Collards-1 bunch
Beets-2 pounds
Radish-1 bunch
Fruit Share in one bag: Bosc Pears, Fuji Apples, Golden Delicious Apples
Mushroom Share-Cremini
Dear CSA Member,
Boy is it cold.  There was even snow this afternoon although it was  short lived.  There is one more delivery after this week in the 2013 CSA season.  As our delivery season comes to an end we are already working on the 2014 season.  Seeds will be ordered, fertilizer, potting soil, the list goes on and on.  We are very busy right into the heart of winter.  There is a list of winter chores that grows each day.
I hope to have the registration open during the next couple of weeks.  The programmers have been upgrading the system to make improvements and all of the testing should be completed soon.  I will send an e-mail message once registration is opened for the 2014 season.
New this week is Celeriac.  A root crop that has a rough exterior but a delicious interior.  Peel the skin and use as you would celery in soups and stews.  The Celeriac will impart a wonderful celery like flavor.  There are also salad recipes using Celeriac on the farm website Recipe section.
If you would like to stock up for the winter there are potatoes, beets and carrots available in bulk through the online Marketplace.  There is still a good supply of coffee through the Marketplace as well.
Make a big pot of soup and keep warm!
Deborah for everyone at Stoneledge Farm
Potatoes-2 pounds
Orange Carrots-1 pound
Yellow Carrots-1 pound.  These are thinner than the orange carrots and should be used more as you would a parsnip.  They will add a very nice flavor to soups and stews.  Kohlrabi-2
Sage-1 bunch
Garlic-2 heads
Celeriac-1 head
Collards-1 bunch
Beets-2 pounds
Radish-1 bunch
Fruit Share in one bag: Bosc Pears, Fuji Apples, Golden Delicious Apples
Mushroom Share-Cremini

Stoneledge Farm LLC
359 Ross Ruland Road
South Cairo, NY  12482

LIKE us at https://www.facebook.com/StoneledgeFarm

Stoneledge Farm LLC
359 Ross Ruland Road
South Cairo, NY  12482

LIKE us at https://www.facebook.com/StoneledgeFarm


 
Nov
12
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Celeriac

I’ve been waiting anxiously for the celeriac to arrive. I have two main uses for this ugly but delicious vegetable: I add it to chicken soup, which makes it much better every time; and I make celeriac remoulade, one of my favorite winter salads. David Lebovitz’s Celeriac Remoulade, below, includes good instructions for preparing celeriac.

I’ve included a few other celeriac recipes—in case we get enough so that I don’t use it all on celeriac remoulade.

NEXT WEEK: I’m going to gather Thanksgiving recipes. If you have any to add, please send them to me.

Celery Remoulade (Céleri Rémoulade)

About six servings

Celery root is pretty easy to prepare, but does discolor a bit once sliced open and grated. So make the dressing before slicing and grating the celery root, for best results. I like mine really mustardy, so I use a fairly large amount. If you’re unsure, start with less; you can add more, to taste, when the salad is finished.

To peel celery root, lop off the root and opposite end with a chef’s knife. Then stand the round root on a flat end then take the knife and cut downward, working around the outside, to slice off the tough skin. In the states, celery root are often smaller, and have more complicated roots, and you’ll need to cut a bit deeper to remove them.

  • 1 cup (240 g) mayonnaise, homemade or store-bought
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt, plus more, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 1/4 pounds (1 kg) celery root

1. Mix together the mayonnaise, mustard, 1 teaspoon of salt, lemon juice, and a few grinds of black pepper.

2. Peel the celery root and grate it coarsely.

3. Mix the dressing with the celery root and taste, adding additional salt, pepper, mustard, and lemon juice, to taste.

Note: If the salad is too thick, you can add a few spoonfuls of whole or low-fat milk to thin it out.

Storage: The salad will keep for one to two days in the refrigerator.

SOME NOTES ON CELERIAC REMOULADE FROM NIGEL SLATER

The French can buy this classic winter salad from any corner shop, whereas we probably have to make it ourselves. It is the best use of the knobbly, ivory-coloured root yet devised.

THE RECIPE

Peel then shred a medium-sized (450g) celeriac. The shreds should not be too fine, nor should they be thicker than a matchstick. Toss them immediately in the juice of half a lemon. Mix together 4 heaped tbsp of good mayonnaise, 2 tbsp of smooth Dijon mustard, 2 tbsp of double cream or crème fraîche and 2 tbsp of chopped parsley. Season with salt and black pepper, then fold into the shredded celeriac. Set aside for 30 minutes then serve with thin slices of ham.

THE TRICK

Toss the shredded roots quickly in lemon juice to stop them discolouring and to tenderise them. The dressing should be just thick enough to cling to the roots – in other words creamy without being soupy. Thin the sauce down with lemon juice if it gets too thick. Cream or crème fraîche sounds extravagant, but is essential if the salad is to be more than just roots in mayo. Don’t attempt to keep it overnight. It will become soft and claggy as the celeriac soaks up the dressing. Chop the parsley finely – this is not the time for roughly chopped.

THE TWIST

Beetroot remoulade has a more vibrant colour and a mixture of celeriac and beets is good, but should be lightly mixed so as not to turn the dressing raspberry pink. Poppy seeds, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds make unorthodox but welcome additions, as do chopped toasted walnuts. A lighter dressing can be made using fromage frais instead of crème fraîche.

CELERY ROOT POTATO MASH

3/4 lb russet potato, peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 1/4 lbs celery root, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, peeled, chopped
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon brandy (optional)
1/4 cup sour cream (use lite if you wish)
1 tablespoon fresh dill, chopped (oruse another fresh herb)
salt & pepper

Directions:

1
Place the potatoes, celery root onion & vinegar in a saucepan, cover wi th water, bring to a boil and simmer until the vegetable are cooked and tender. (apprx.25 minutes).
2
Drain the veggies, stir in the brandy, mash the vegetables. Leave them slightly chunky.
3
Stir in the sour cream & dill. Season with salt & Pepper.

Celeriac, chicory and orange salad with toasted cashews

I love raw celeriac in a salad. Its flavour, both earthy and sweet, balances piquant, sharp or bitter ingredients beautifully. Serves four.

75g cashew nuts
2 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp English mustard
2 tsp cider vinegar
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
250g celeriac
1 head chicory
1 large orange

Put the nuts in a dry frying pan, toss over a medium heat for a few minutes until lightly toasted, then set aside to cool.

Combine the olive oil, mustard and vinegar with some salt and pepper, and tip into a mixing bowl. Peel the celeriac and cut it into matchsticks. Toss the julienned root immediately in the dressing to stop it from browning. Trim the chicory and separate the leaves, then add to the celeriac in the bowl. Spread the dressed celeriac and chicory on a plate.

Cut a slice off the base of the orange and stand it on a board. Use a sharp knife to cut through the peel and pith of the orange, slicing it away completely, in sections. Working over the plate of celeriac so any juice that escapes will fall on to it, cut out the individual orange segments, letting them drop on to the salad as you go. Squeeze any juice out of the remaining orange membrane over the salad. Add some more salt and pepper to taste, scatter over the cashews and serve.

COLLARDS

A friend who grew up in North Carolina taught me her family’s collard recipe. It’s not really a recipe as much as a technique.

Wash the collards and cut into ribbons. Bring a big pot of water to a boil and add the collards. Add some meaty bones—a ham hock, marrow bones, other soup bones—a slices carrot and a sliced onion. Then cook the collards for at least two hours, adding water if necessary. When they are totally soft and creamy, having lost their original shape, remove the bones and chop up whatever shreds of meat still cling to them. Season with salt and cayenne.


 
Nov
05
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Dear CSA Member,

Wind, rain, falling leaves and it is cold.  The fall is coming to a close and the landscape is now moving from bright color to grays.  The garden is still producing even as the seasons start another change.
It is the season for root crops.  The root crops have been growing underground all throughout the season and now fill the shares. Heavy and hearty: Bolero Carrots, Potatoes, Beets, Purple Globe Turnips.  The leafy greens of fall, Flat Leaf Parsley and Red Russian Kale which seem to grow more vibrant in the cold.
Popcorn will be in the share this week.  It was picked about 3 weeks ago and has been drying in the greenhouse.  It will need to dry another 3 weeks in your home. I did try a cob to see if the kernels would pop and had great success but I think it may be worth letting the corn dry a bit more before trying to pop. The kernels need to be fully dry or they will not pop properly.  It will be hard to wait but worth it.  When the pop corn is ready to pop take the the kernels from the cob. Once you get a row started it is easy to pick the other rows off the cob.   Add about 1 tablespoon of oil to the bottom of a pan with a lid.  Add 1/2 cup of kernels to the pan, put on the lid-very important!  Turn to medium high heat and listen for the pop.  When the popping slows and then stops take from the heat right away.  The yellow of the corn was so bright that the kernels looked like they had butter on them even without.  Add salt, butter or let your imagination go.  Enjoy.
On the Marketplace are bulk options for Potatoes, Carrots and Beets.  Honey is getting low as is the Maple Syrup.  This is Week #22 so there are only two more deliveries after this week.  The Coffee is perfect for these cold wintry days and you might want to stock up on some of the other products before the season ends.
Enjoy the vegetables
Deborah for everyone at Stoneledge Farm
The list for this week follows.
Potatoes-2 pounds
Beets-2 pounds
Carrots-1 pound
Red Russian Kale-1 bunch  What beautiful color the cold weather has brought out in the kale.
Purple Globe Turnips-2
Flat Leaf Parsley-1 bunch
Garlic-2 heads
Acorn Winter Squash-1
Popcorn-4 cobs
Hot Peppers-take if you like
Fruit Share-1 bag with Bosc Pears, Stayman Winesap Apples (dark burgundy colored, good for cooking) Fuji Apples (excellent eating apples) Mutsu Apples (all purpose apple, green)
Mushroom Share-Shiitake
Coffee Share delivery this week.

Stoneledge Farm LLC
359 Ross Ruland Road
South Cairo, NY  12482

LIKE us at https://www.facebook.com/StoneledgeFarm


 
Nov
05
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Usually, by this time of year, my freezer is full of a summer’s worth of vegetables, and my counters and refrigerator shelves are lined with jars of pickles, sauces, and preserves. I was less diligent this year, and I’m sure I’ll feel it all winter. But looking at this week’s share, I see several things that will last well into winter with just a little preparation.

POTATOES: I find that potatoes will last for several weeks or even a few months if they are not subjected to warm places. I keep them in a plastic bag, punched with several holes, and near an open window—but not in the refrigerator. Check them every few days and if they show even the slightest softness, use them or throw them away. There are very few things that smell as awful as a potato that has gone to mush—and once one goes bad, it takes the rest of them with it.

CARROTS: Carrots last only a few weeks in the refrigerator, but they freeze well. Peel, slice or dice (or grate), boil them for a few minutes, cool, and pack into ziplock bags. When thawed, they can be used in any recipe calling for cooked carrots. Or—make a Carrot Cake from Recipes from America’s Small Farms (p. 206) and freeze slices of that.

KALE AND OTHER GREENS: Greens are among the easiest vegetables to store for winter. Wash and chop them roughly, then blanch in boiling watehr for about 30 seconds. Drain in a colander until almost dry—you can leave a bit of moisture, but water will turn to ice when you freeze. Pack in ziplock bags and squeeze out all the air before you put them in the freezer. I pound the bags until they so thin that they take up very little space in the freezer.

BEETS: Fresh beets will last in the refrigerator for up to a month before they start to get moldy—sometimes longer if you’re not fussy. But you can also freeze them—roast, peel, slice and store in ziplock bags. Another way to preserve beets is by picking them. Pickled beets will last for several weeks in the refrigerator in a tightly closed jar—or they can be canned by following instructions on the Ball Canning Jar or USDA websites. Here’s one recipe for pickled beets from Allrecipes.com:

5 pounds fresh small beets, stems removed

1 cup white sugar

1.5 teaspoon pickling salt

2 cups white vinegar

1/8 cup whole cloves

  1. Place beets in a large stockpot with water to cover. Bring to a boil, and cook until tender, about 15 minutes depending on the size of the beets. If beets are large, cut them into quarters. Drain, reserving 2 cups of the beet water, cool and peel.
  2. Sterilize jars and lids by immersing in boiling water for at least 10 minutes. Fill each jar with beets and add several whole cloves to each jar.
  3. In a large saucepan, combine the sugar, beet water, vinegar, and pickling salt. Bring to a rapid boil. Pour the hot brine over the beets in the jars, and seal lids.
  4. Place a rack in the bottom of a large stockpot and fill halfway with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then carefully lower the jars into the pot using a holder. Leave a 2 inch space between the jars. Pour in more boiling water if necessary until the water level is at least 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Bring the water to a full boil, cover the pot, and process for 10 minutes.

One other idea: Make a batch of beet burgers (Recipes from America’s Small Farms) p. 195. They can be frozen before or after baking.

PARSLEY  Blanch fresh parsley and freeze, in small quantities, in ziplock bags.

TURNIPS and CAULIFLOWER: Both of these can be frozen—cook briefly, squeeze out the water, and pack in ziplocks. Both can also be pureed before freezing—they take up less space in the freezer that way and can be used in soups.

STOCK: Just about all the vegetables in today’s share can be used for a tasty stock that will improve everything else you cook. Chop everything fairly small—and you can use scraps and leaves in the stock—and bring to a boil in several quarts of water. Then simmer for a few hours until the stock Is reduced, the flavor is full; season with salt and pepper.  I usually store in one- or two-cups containers.

STORAGE

Usually, by this time of year, my freezer is full of a summer’s worth of vegetables, and my counters and refrigerator shelves are lined with jars of pickles, sauces, and preserves. I was less diligent this year, and I’m sure I’ll feel it all winter. But looking at this week’s share, I see several things that will last well into winter with just a little preparation.

POTATOES: I find that potatoes will last for several weeks or even a few months if they are not subjected to warm places. I keep them in a plastic bag, punched with several holes, and near an open window—but not in the refrigerator. Check them every few days and if they show even the slightest softness, use them or throw them away. There are very few things that smell as awful as a potato that has gone to mush—and once one goes bad, it takes the rest of them with it.

CARROTS: Carrots last only a few weeks in the refrigerator, but they freeze well. Peel, slice or dice (or grate), boil them for a few minutes, cool, and pack into ziplock bags. When thawed, they can be used in any recipe calling for cooked carrots. Or—make a Carrot Cake from Recipes from America’s Small Farms (p. 206) and freeze slices of that.

KALE AND OTHER GREENS: Greens are among the easiest vegetables to store for winter. Wash and chop them roughly, then blanch in boiling watehr for about 30 seconds. Drain in a colander until almost dry—you can leave a bit of moisture, but water will turn to ice when you freeze. Pack in ziplock bags and squeeze out all the air before you put them in the freezer. I pound the bags until they so thin that they take up very little space in the freezer.

BEETS: Fresh beets will last in the refrigerator for up to a month before they start to get moldy—sometimes longer if you’re not fussy. But you can also freeze them—roast, peel, slice and store in ziplock bags. Another way to preserve beets is by picking them. Pickled beets will last for several weeks in the refrigerator in a tightly closed jar—or they can be canned by following instructions on the Ball Canning Jar or USDA websites. Here’s one recipe for pickled beets from Allrecipes.com:

5 pounds fresh small beets, stems removed

1 cup white sugar

1.5 teaspoon pickling salt

2 cups white vinegar

1/8 cup whole cloves

  1. Place beets in a large stockpot with water to cover. Bring to a boil, and cook until tender, about 15 minutes depending on the size of the beets. If beets are large, cut them into quarters. Drain, reserving 2 cups of the beet water, cool and peel.
  2. Sterilize jars and lids by immersing in boiling water for at least 10 minutes. Fill each jar with beets and add several whole cloves to each jar.
  3. In a large saucepan, combine the sugar, beet water, vinegar, and pickling salt. Bring to a rapid boil. Pour the hot brine over the beets in the jars, and seal lids.
  4. Place a rack in the bottom of a large stockpot and fill halfway with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then carefully lower the jars into the pot using a holder. Leave a 2 inch space between the jars. Pour in more boiling water if necessary until the water level is at least 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Bring the water to a full boil, cover the pot, and process for 10 minutes.

One other idea: Make a batch of beet burgers (Recipes from America’s Small Farms) p. 195. They can be frozen before or after baking.

PARSLEY  Blanch fresh parsley and freeze, in small quantities, in ziplock bags.

TURNIPS and CAULIFLOWER: Both of these can be frozen—cook briefly, squeeze out the water, and pack in ziplocks. Both can also be pureed before freezing—they take up less space in the freezer that way and can be used in soups.

STOCK: Just about all the vegetables in today’s share can be used for a tasty stock that will improve everything else you cook. Chop everything fairly small—and you can use scraps and leaves in the stock—and bring to a boil in several quarts of water. Then simmer for a few hours until the stock Is reduced, the flavor is full; season with salt and pepper.  I usually store in one- or two-cups containers.

STORAGE

Usually, by this time of year, my freezer is full of a summer’s worth of vegetables, and my counters and refrigerator shelves are lined with jars of pickles, sauces, and preserves. I was less diligent this year, and I’m sure I’ll feel it all winter. But looking at this week’s share, I see several things that will last well into winter with just a little preparation.

POTATOES: I find that potatoes will last for several weeks or even a few months if they are not subjected to warm places. I keep them in a plastic bag, punched with several holes, and near an open window—but not in the refrigerator. Check them every few days and if they show even the slightest softness, use them or throw them away. There are very few things that smell as awful as a potato that has gone to mush—and once one goes bad, it takes the rest of them with it.

CARROTS: Carrots last only a few weeks in the refrigerator, but they freeze well. Peel, slice or dice (or grate), boil them for a few minutes, cool, and pack into ziplock bags. When thawed, they can be used in any recipe calling for cooked carrots. Or—make a Carrot Cake from Recipes from America’s Small Farms (p. 206) and freeze slices of that.

KALE AND OTHER GREENS: Greens are among the easiest vegetables to store for winter. Wash and chop them roughly, then blanch in boiling watehr for about 30 seconds. Drain in a colander until almost dry—you can leave a bit of moisture, but water will turn to ice when you freeze. Pack in ziplock bags and squeeze out all the air before you put them in the freezer. I pound the bags until they so thin that they take up very little space in the freezer.

BEETS: Fresh beets will last in the refrigerator for up to a month before they start to get moldy—sometimes longer if you’re not fussy. But you can also freeze them—roast, peel, slice and store in ziplock bags. Another way to preserve beets is by picking them. Pickled beets will last for several weeks in the refrigerator in a tightly closed jar—or they can be canned by following instructions on the Ball Canning Jar or USDA websites. Here’s one recipe for pickled beets from Allrecipes.com:

5 pounds fresh small beets, stems removed

1 cup white sugar

1.5 teaspoon pickling salt

2 cups white vinegar

1/8 cup whole cloves

  1. Place beets in a large stockpot with water to cover. Bring to a boil, and cook until tender, about 15 minutes depending on the size of the beets. If beets are large, cut them into quarters. Drain, reserving 2 cups of the beet water, cool and peel.
  2. Sterilize jars and lids by immersing in boiling water for at least 10 minutes. Fill each jar with beets and add several whole cloves to each jar.
  3. In a large saucepan, combine the sugar, beet water, vinegar, and pickling salt. Bring to a rapid boil. Pour the hot brine over the beets in the jars, and seal lids.
  4. Place a rack in the bottom of a large stockpot and fill halfway with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then carefully lower the jars into the pot using a holder. Leave a 2 inch space between the jars. Pour in more boiling water if necessary until the water level is at least 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Bring the water to a full boil, cover the pot, and process for 10 minutes.

One other idea: Make a batch of beet burgers (Recipes from America’s Small Farms) p. 195. They can be frozen before or after baking.

PARSLEY  Blanch fresh parsley and freeze, in small quantities, in ziplock bags.

TURNIPS and CAULIFLOWER: Both of these can be frozen—cook briefly, squeeze out the water, and pack in ziplocks. Both can also be pureed before freezing—they take up less space in the freezer that way and can be used in soups.

STOCK: Just about all the vegetables in today’s share can be used for a tasty stock that will improve everything else you cook. Chop everything fairly small—and you can use scraps and leaves in the stock—and bring to a boil in several quarts of water. Then simmer for a few hours until the stock Is reduced, the flavor is full; season with salt and pepper.  I usually store in one- or two-cups containers.