Sep
30
    
Posted (Lori) in News

DRESSING FOR FALL

Fall salads are different from the ones we make in summer. In summer, the goal, at least for me, is to keep the oven off and the dressing light. When cooler weather comes around, I use:

–heavier, spicier greens like mizuna and arugula in addition to lettuce;

–cooked ingredients—roasted carrots, butternut squash, and beets, boiled potatos

–chunks of cheese

–nuts

–avocado

–grains, such as quinoa, farro, orzo

–fall fruit: fresh and dried apples, pears, and grapes; orange and grapefruit

And the salads are heavier and spicier as well, often heated. Here are two of them:

WARM CIDER VINAIGRETTE (from the Food Network(

¾ cup apple cider or apple juice

2 tbs cider vinegar

2 tbs minced shallots

2 tsp Dijon mustard

½ cup olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Combine the apple cider, vinegar, and shallots in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook for 6 to 8 minutes, until the cider is reduced to about 1/4 cup. Off the heat, whisk in the mustard, olive oil, salt and pepper.

MAPLE BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE From Land o’ Lakes

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 cup maple syrup

2 teaspoons country-style Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh garlic

1/2 teaspoon salt

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until completely combined.

ROASTED TOMATILLO SALSA

From Rick Bayless
8 ounces (5 to 6 medium) tomatillos, husked and rinsed
Fresh hot green chiles, to taste (roughly 2 serranos or 1 jalapeno), stemmed
5 or 6 sprigs fresh cilantro (thick stems removed), roughly chopped (or, if you don’t like cilantro, use parsley)
Scant 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
Salt

Preheat a broiler.

Roast the tomatillos and chiles on a baking sheet 4 inches below a very hot broiler until darkly roasted, even blackened in spots, about 5 minutes. Flip them over and roast the other side, 4 to 5 minutes more will give you splotchy-black and blistered tomatillos and chiles. In a blender or food processor, combine the tomatillos and chiles, including all the delicious juice that has run onto the baking sheet. Add the cilantro/parsley and 1/4 cup water, blend to a coarse puree, and scrape into a serving dish. Rinse the onion under cold water, then shake to remove the excess moisture. Stir into the salsa and season with salt, usually a generous 1/4 teaspoon.

GREEN RICE with tomatillos

1 recipe Tomatillo Salsa, recipe follows
6 Poblano or Ancho chiles, roasted, peeled and seeded
5 Romaine lettuce leaves
2 bunches cilantro, stems and leaves
4 scallions, white and green parts
6 garlic cloves, peeled
1/2 cup cold water
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3 cups long-grain rice, rinsed

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour the tomatillo salsa into a food processor or a blender. Add the chiles, lettuce leaves, cilantro, scallions, garlic, water and salt and process until liquified. Set aside. In a medium skillet heat vegetable oil over medium-low heat. Add rice, stirring constantly, until golden and crackling, about five minutes. Pour in the reserved green puree and stir to combine. Transfer to a 4-quart baking dish, cover with foil and bake until the liquid is absorbed and the rice is tender, 30 – 35 minutes. Stir with a fork and serve hot.

TOMATILLO SALSA (GREEN SALSA)
1 pound tomatillos, husked, washed and cut into quarters
2 – 4 large hot peppers, stemmed, seeded if desired and roughly chopped
1/2 cup cold water
1/2 medium onion, cut in half
2 bunches cilantro, stems and leaves
2 teaspoons salt

In blender place tomatillos, jalapenos and water. Puree until just chunky. Add remaining ingredients and puree about 2 minutes more, or until no large chunks remain. This salsa keeps in the refrigerator, in a covered container, about 3 days.

SPICY CHICKEN AND TOMATILLO SOUP

From: What’s Cooking America

2 whole chicken breasts, boneless and skinless
1 pound tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and quartered
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced
1 Russet potato, peeled and quartered
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 to 2 fresh jalapeno chile peppers (stems and seeds removed) or according to your taste
4 cups chicken broth or stock
3 cups water
Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste
1/4 cup sour cream
2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Prepare Tomatillos: Remove the husks before using, the husks are inedible. Tomatillos are very easy to cook with because they don’t need to be peeled or seeded. Their texture is firm when raw, but soften when cooked. Rinse before using as the tomatillo is covered by a sticky substance. Do not peel the green skin.

In a large soup pot (or cast-iron Dutch oven) over medium heat, add chicken, onion, garlic, tomatillos, potato, oregano, chile pepper, chicken stock, and water; cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce head to low and simmer 20 to 30 minutes until chicken is tender and the meat falls from the bone. Remove chicken from the pot to a bowl or plate and set aside to cool (when cool, take meat from the bones and shred into pieces). Refrigerate cooked chicken until ready to use.

Remove the soup pot from the heat and let the vegetables and broth cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree the vegetable and broth in a blender or food processor.

When ready to serve, reheat the vegetable soup puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until hot. Adjust seasoning if necessary.

To serve, place a small pile of the shredded chicken into each soup bowl. Ladle the pureed soup around the pile of chicken in each bowl. Top each bowl of soup with sour cream and cilantro.

CHILIS RELLENOS

The following recipe for Mexican stuffed peppers claims authenticity. A more complicated recipe from Rick Bayless can be found at:  http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/view?recipeID=205

My own recipe is much less authentic; I use mozzarella as the stuffing, and I shred it and toss it with sautéed onions, garlic and other spices before I put it in the onions. And instead of coating the peppers with flour and egg, I dip into egg first, and then matzo meal, which is probably hard to find in Mexico. And I use much less oil—I use an 8-inch pan that fits 4-6 peppers and find that about ¼ cup of oil comes about ½ inch up the sides and that’s enough.

6 fresh Anaheim chile peppers

1 (8 ounce) package queso asadero (white Mexican cheese), cut into 3/4-inch thick strips

2 eggs, separated

1 teaspoon baking powder

¾ cup all-purpose flour

1 cup vegetable shortening or oil, for frying

  1. Preheat the oven’s broiler and set the oven rack at about 6 inches from the heat source. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place peppers onto the prepared baking sheet, and cook under the preheated broiler until the skin of the peppers has blackened and blistered, about 10 minutes. Turn the peppers often to blacken all sides. Place the blackened peppers into a bowl, and tightly seal with plastic wrap. Allow the peppers to steam as they cool, about 15 minutes.
  2. Rinse cooled peppers under cold water to peel off the skins, and cut a slit along the long side of each pepper to remove the seeds and core. Rinse the peppers inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Stuff the peppers with strips of the cheese.
  3. Whisk the egg yolks in a bowl with the baking powder. In a second metal bowl, beat the egg whites with an electric mixer until the whites form stiff peaks. Gently fold the beaten egg whites into the yolk mixture. Place flour into a shallow bowl.
  4. Heat the vegetable shortening in a skillet over medium heat. Roll each stuffed pepper in flour, tap off excess flour, and dip the peppers into the egg mixture to coat both sides. Gently lay the coated peppers into the hot shortening. Fry peppers until lightly golden brown and the cheese has melted, about 5 minutes per side.


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