Nov
13
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Cabbage and Apple Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing
Sometimes nothing else will satisfy me but a fresh, raw, crunchy and delicious salad. But, at the end of winter and in the beginning of spring there’s not too much produce being harvested.
The ground, in most places, is still hard as a rock, and the new spring sprouts have yet to burst up and start growing.
That means, it’s a great time of year to enjoy the hardy wintry-type foods that are still abundantly available, but prepare them in a much lighter way.
As a salad!
I’m using Chinese cabbage in this recipe, but you can use any type. There are so many to choose from. Purple cabbage, for example, would make this dish really stand out with a burst of bright color if you’re craving some eye candy.
Cabbage has a mildly sweet flavor and is rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), choline, beta carotene, folate, and fiber. It also contains sulphur compounds that help with digestive health, liver health and bodily detoxification.
So, if you’re craving a crunchy and delicious salad like I am, get yourself a beautiful head of cabbage and start chopping! Your whole body will thank you for it.
Cabbage and Apple Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing
Print
Prep time
10 mins
Total time
10 mins
Author: Andrea Beaman
Recipe type: Salad
Cuisine: Healthy and Delcious
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
½ head Chinese cabbage (or other cabbage)
1 apple, seeded and sliced into thick matchsticks
¼ cup parsley, chopped
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. ginger juice
2 tsp. raw local honey
¼ tsp. sea salt
¼ cup crushed roasted almonds
Instructions
Shred the cabbage or slice it thin
Place into a large mixing bowl
Add apple and parsley
Whisk the oil, vinegar, ginger juice, honey and salt
Pour over the sale and toss to coat
Garnish with crushed toasted almonds

CREAMY CAULIFLOWER PUREE WITH TOASTED SESAME SEEDS

Author: Andrea Beaman

Prep time: 15 mins Cook time: 35 mins Total time: 50 mins

Serves: 4 servings

Ingredients

1 small head Romanesco broccoli florets, plus ¼ cup cauliflower florets

Olive oil

Black pepper

1 large head cauliflower (or 4 cups of florets)

4-5 large garlic cloves, peeled

2 & ½ cups vegetable stock (water or milk of your choice)

3-4 tbsp. grass-fed butter

1 tsp. sea salt

1 tbsp. fennel seeds

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375.

Chop romanesco and ¼ cup cauliflower into small florets.

Put florets into a mixing bowl and lightly coat with olive oil, sea salt and black pepper.

Place onto a baking tray and bake 30-35 minutes.

While romanesco and florets are baking, bring remaining cauliflower (4 cups), garlic, stock, butter and 1 tsp. sea salt to a boil in a soup pot.

Reduce heat to simmer, cover and cook 15 minutes.

Pour soup ingredients into a food processor or Vitamix.

Puree until smooth and creamy.

Ladle puree into a soup bowl and top with roasted romanesco and cauliflower florets.

In a small frying pan, lightly toast fennel seeds on a low heat for 5-7 minutes (or until lightly toasted and fragrant).

Top with toasted fennel seeds.

CINNAMON AND NUTMEG SPICED SQUASH SOUP

As the season’s shift and the weather cools, it’s a wise idea to incorporate more warming and nourishing foods into your diet.

Winter squash is definitely one of those prized ingredients that I love during the fall and winter months. It is not only warming, sweet and delicious, it contains quite a few carotenoids that support good health: alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin.[1]

According to studies, dietary carotenoids provide health benefits by decreasing the risk of disease, particularly certain cancers and eye disease.  “The carotenoids that have been most studied in this regard are beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. In part, the beneficial effects of carotenoids are thought to be due to their role as antioxidants. Beta-Carotene may have added benefits due its ability to be converted to vitamin A. Furthermore, lutein and zeaxanthin may be protective in eye disease because they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye.”[2]

But, besides the scientific mumbo jumbo, squash has a sweet flavor that helps support the stomach/spleen/pancreas. This is the system in the body that thrives on the naturally sweet flavor of good starches and carbohydrates.

I’ve also included some savory and warming spices into this recipe. Both cinnamon and nutmeg bring heat into the digestive system, helping you digest your food better.

Try it yourself and see how you feel. I bet on a cold blustery day, your body will thank you for this delicious meal.

2-3 tbsp. grass-fed butter

1 onion, peeled and diced

4-5 cups butternut squash, peeled and cubed (1 large butternut squash)

1 & 1/2 tsp. Real sea salt

2-3 inches, ginger peeled and chopped

1 tsp. organic ground nutmeg

1 tsp. ground cinnamon

4 cups duck stock, water, veggie stock or milk

In a soup pot on medium high heat, saute onion and squash in butter for 3-4 minutes. Add sea salt, ginger, nutmeg and cinnamon. Add stock and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to simmer for 15 minutes. Put all ingredients into a food processor or blender and puree. Add soup back to the pot and season with more salt if needed. Enjoy!

Cabbage and Apple Salad with Honey Ginger Dressing

Sometimes nothing else will satisfy me but a fresh, raw, crunchy and delicious salad. But, at the end of winter and in the beginning of spring there’s not too much produce being harvested.

The ground, in most places, is still hard as a rock, and the new spring sprouts have yet to burst up and start growing.

That means, it’s a great time of year to enjoy the hardy wintry-type foods that are still abundantly available, but prepare them in a much lighter way.

As a salad!

I’m using Chinese cabbage in this recipe, but you can use any type. There are so many to choose from. Purple cabbage, for example, would make this dish really stand out with a burst of bright color if you’re craving some eye candy.

Cabbage has a mildly sweet flavor and is rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), choline, beta carotene, folate, and fiber. It also contains sulphur compounds that help with digestive health, liver health and bodily detoxification.

So, if you’re craving a crunchy and delicious salad like I am, get yourself a beautiful head of cabbage and start chopping! Your whole body will thank you for it.

CABBAGE AND APPLE SALAD WITH HONEY GINGER DRESSING

Prep time: 10 mins Total time: 10 mins

Author: Andrea Beaman

Recipe type: Salad

Serves: 4 servings

Ingredients

½ head Chinese cabbage (or other cabbage)

1 apple, seeded and sliced into thick matchsticks

¼ cup parsley, chopped

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar

1 tsp. ginger juice

2 tsp. raw local honey

¼ tsp. sea salt

¼ cup crushed roasted almonds

Instructions

Shred the cabbage or slice it thin

Place into a large mixing bowl

Add apple and parsley

Whisk the oil, vinegar, ginger juice, honey and salt

Pour over the sale and toss to coat

Garnish with crushed toasted almonds


 
Nov
13
    
Posted (Lori) in News

SMASHED CARROTS WITH FETA AND MINT

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 pounds large carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks

Salt and pepper

2 cloves garlic, minced

6 ounces feta cheese, crumbled

2 tablespoons freshly chopped mint leaves

Pinch of crushed red pepper (optional)

In a large, heavy pot with a lid, warm olive oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add carrots and stir to coat. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Add garlic, stir, and let sizzle just until golden; do not let it brown. Then add 1 cup water and cover pot.

Reduce heat to low, and simmer until tender, about 10 minutes. Remove lid, and turn heat to high. Simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated.

With a potato masher, crush carrots roughly, right in the pot, leaving mixture a bit chunky. Set aside until ready to serve.

To serve, reheat carrots over low heat. Fold most of the feta and mint into the hot carrot mixture, reserving enough for garnish. Transfer to a serving dish. Sprinkle with crushed red pepper, if using. Top with remaining feta and mint.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CHORIZO

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

8 ounces fresh, soft Spanish chorizo, chopped in 1/2-inch pieces

1 ½ pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed and sliced 1/4-inch thick

Salt and pepper

3 garlic cloves, minced

½ teaspoon pimentón (Spanish smoked paprika), picante (hot) or dulce (sweet)

2 tablespoons roughly chopped parsley

In a wide skillet, warm olive oil over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add chorizo and let sizzle for a minute or so, until it releases some of its fat.

Mash chorizo with a wooden spoon, encouraging it to crumble. Cook, stirring, until slightly browned, about 2 minutes more. Use a slotted spoon to remove chorizo and set aside. Leave oil bubbling in skillet.

Add brussels sprouts to the skillet, and season generously with salt and pepper. Raise heat to high and cook, stirring, until sprouts are tender and lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Reduce heat if needed to prevent scorching.

Add garlic and pimentón and stir to coat. Return chorizo to pan and cook, stirring, 2 minutes more. Sprinkle with parsley and transfer to a serving dish. Serve hot.

SPICY STIR-FRIED CABBAGE

4 garlic cloves, minced

2 teaspoons minced ginger

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 star anise, broken in half

2 teaspoons soy sauce (more to taste)

2 tablespoons Shao Hsing rice wine or dry sherry

2 tablespoons peanut or canola oil

1 small cabbage, 1 to 1 1/2 pounds, quartered, cored and cut crosswise into 1/8-inch shreds

1 medium carrot, cut into julienne

Salt to taste

2 tablespoons minced chives, Chinese chives or cilantro

Combine the garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes and star anise in a small bowl. Combine the soy sauce and wine or sherry in another small bowl.

Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or a 12-inch skillet over high heat until a drop of water evaporates within a second or two when added to the pan. Swirl in the oil by adding it to the sides of the pan and tilting it back and forth. Add the garlic, ginger, pepper flakes and star anise. Stir-fry for a few seconds, just until fragrant, then add the cabbage and carrots. Stir-fry for one to two minutes until the cabbage begins to wilt, then add the salt and wine/soy sauce mixture. Cover and cook over high heat for one minute until just wilted. Uncover and stir-fry for another 30 seconds, then stir in the chives or cilantro and remove from the heat. The cabbage should be crisp-tender. Serve with rice or noodles.

CARAMELIZED TURNIPS WITH CAPERS, LEMON AND PARSLEY

3 pounds small turnips or daikon radish

3 tablespoons olive oil

Salt

pepper

2 small garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and roughly chopped

Zest of 1/2 lemon

3 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Juice of 1/2 lemon, or to taste

Peel turnips, halve lengthwise and slice into half-moons 1/4-inch thick.

Heat olive oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches if needed, add turnips. Sauté, turning often and lowering the heat if necessary, until nicely browned and cooked through, about 8 to 10 minutes.

Season with salt and pepper, then transfer to an oven-proof serving dish. If not serving immediately, leave at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, or refrigerate and bring to room temperature, before reheating in a 400-degree oven for 10 minutes.

To serve, mix garlic, capers, lemon zest and parsley; sprinkle over turnips. Drizzle with lemon juice.


 
Nov
10
    
Posted (Lori) in News

Help Kids Ban Toxic Pesticides in NYC Parks,

Playgrounds, and Other Public Spaces!

In 2014, kindergarteners from PS 290 asked their Councilmember to introduce a bill to ban toxic pesticides. In 2015, INTRO 0800 was introduced. In 2017, the children, area residents, and environmental activists testified at a hearing of the City Council Committee on Health.

Now, let’s help the children fulfill their dream – please!

Letter Writing and Phone Call Campaign

We need 18 more Councilmembers to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.

The 8 co-sponsors of INTRO 0800 – 2015 are listed in bold.

Help turn at least 18 City Council from red to green. Ask them to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.

Call or e-mail (https://council.nyc.gov/districts/) or send a snail mail letter to: 250 Broadway. NYC, NY. 10007.


1. Margaret S. Chin.

2. Rosie Mendez.

3. Corey Johnson. (co-sponsor).

4. Daniel R. Garodnick.

5. Ben Kallos. (sponsor)

6. Helen Rosenthal (co-sponsor)

7. Mark Levine.

8. Melissa Mark-Viverito.

9. Bill Perkins.

10. Ydanis Rodriguez.

11. Andrew Cohen.

12. Andy King.

13. James Vacca.

14. Zerega Fernando Cabrera.

15. Ritchie J. Torres.

16. Vanessa L. Gibson.

17. Rafael Salamanca Jr.

18. Annabel Palma.

19. Paul Vallone.

20. Peter Koo (co-sponsor).

21. Julissa Ferreras-Copeland.

22. Costa Constantinides (co-sponsor).

23. Barry Grodenchik.

24. Rory I. Lancman.

25. Daniel Dromm.

Daniel Garodnick:

250 Broadway Suite 1762

212-788-7393 phone

26. Jimmy Van Bramer.

27. I. Daneek Miller.

28. Vacant.

29. Karen Koslowitz.

30. Elizabeth S. Crowley.

31. Donovan J. Richards.

32. Eric A. Ulrich.

33. Stephen T. Levin. (co-sponsor)

34. Antonio Reynoso.

35. Robert E. Cornegy Jr.

36. Rafael L. Espinal Jr.

37. Carlos Menchaca (co-sponsor).

38. Brad Lander.

39. Mathieu Eugene (co-sponsor).

40. Darlene Mealy (co-sponsor).

41. Inez Barron.

42. Vincent Gentile.

43. David G. Greenfield.

44. Jumaane D. Williams.

45. Alan N. Maisel.

46. Mark Treyger.

47. Chaim M. Deutsch.

48. Deborah Rose.

49. Steven Matteo.

50. Joseph C. Borelli.


Sample letters.

Feel free to use these or write your own letter. Send to 250 Broadway. NYC, NY 10007

Your name

Address

New York City, New York (zipcode)

Dear City Council Member __________,

I call on you to support INTRO 800 which would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City properties, including parks. This important legislation is so important in protecting our health. Eliminating toxic pesticides in parks and other public spaces will also protect our water waterways from toxic runoff.

I urge you to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.

Sincerely,

__________________________

For children

Your name

Address

New York City, New York (zipcode)

Dear City Council Member ________,

I am a student at ______________________________. I am _____ years old. Please support INTRO 0800 which will ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks, playgrounds, and public spaces. Toxic pesticides are really bad for children. Please co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.

Sincerely,

___________________

Talking Points for phone calls

Hello. My name is ________________. I’m calling about INTRO 0800, a bill that would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks and public spaces.

I would like Council member _____________ to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 because:

Pesticides like Roundup have glyphosate which is so dangerous for children, adults, and animals.

Pesticides can get into the water supply.

Add any other points you want to make.

Do you think that Council member __________________ will co-sponsor INTRO 0800?

Thank you very much. (If they are not sure yet, ask them to call you back, or you can agree to call them back.)

If a Council member says, yes, they will co-sponsor INTRO 0800, please let us know at www.intro0800.com.

November 2017

Mitchell Silver

Commissioner, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

The Arsenal

Central Park

830 Fifth Ave

New York, NY 10065

Dear Commissioner Silver,

We ask you with a great sense of urgency to thoughtfully consider supporting New York City Legislation INTRO 0800, which would ban the use of toxic pesticides on New York City parks and properties.

There are a growing number of parents throughout the city who are very concerned about the many toxic chemicals used throughout the city and we are looking to you to help make a positive change for the sake of our children.

This important legislation has long been needed to protect the health of all New Yorkers

who regularly utilize the parks and live in nearby apartments, especially our children.  City children already bear an unusually high chemical burden, and eliminating this unnecessary use of pesticides will have a positive impact on their health.

Non-toxic lawn and landscape products, which are widely available and have proven to be effective alternatives to toxic chemical pesticides, have been used very successfully in several of our city parks.

We very much appreciate your support of this effort by concerned citizens of this great city and need your help to convince our council members to pass INTRO 0800-2015.

Sincerely,

Help Kids Ban Toxic Pesticides in NYC Parks,               Playgrounds, and Other Public Spaces!
In 2014, kindergarteners from PS 290 asked their Councilmember to introduce a bill to ban toxic pesticides. In 2015, INTRO 0800 was introduced. In 2017, the children, area residents, and environmental activists testified at a hearing of the City Council Committee on Health.
Now, let’s help the children fulfill their dream – please!
Letter Writing and Phone Call Campaign
We need 18 more Councilmembers to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.  The 8 co-sponsors of INTRO 0800 – 2015 are listed in bold.  Help turn at least 18 City Council from red to green. Ask them to co-sponsor INTRO 0800.  Call or e-mail (https://council.nyc.gov/districts/) or send a snail mail letter to: 250 Broadway. NYC, NY. 10007.
1. Margaret S. Chin.
2. Rosie Mendez.
3. Corey Johnson. (co-sponsor).
4. Daniel R. Garodnick.
5. Ben Kallos. (sponsor)
6. Helen Rosenthal (co-sponsor)
7. Mark Levine.
8. Melissa Mark-Viverito.
9. Bill Perkins.
10. Ydanis Rodriguez.
11. Andrew Cohen.
12. Andy King.
13. James Vacca.
14. Zerega Fernando Cabrera.
15. Ritchie J. Torres.
16. Vanessa L. Gibson.
17. Rafael Salamanca Jr.
18. Annabel Palma.
19. Paul Vallone.
20. Peter Koo (co-sponsor).
21. Julissa Ferreras-Copeland.
22. Costa Constantinides (co-sponsor).
23. Barry Grodenchik.
24. Rory I. Lancman.
25. Daniel Dromm.
Daniel Garodnick:
250 Broadway Suite 1762
212-788-7393 phone
26. Jimmy Van Bramer.
27. I. Daneek Miller.
28. Vacant.
29. Karen Koslowitz.
30. Elizabeth S. Crowley.
31. Donovan J. Richards.
32. Eric A. Ulrich.
33. Stephen T. Levin. (co-sponsor)
34. Antonio Reynoso.
35. Robert E. Cornegy Jr.
36. Rafael L. Espinal Jr.
37. Carlos Menchaca (co-sponsor).
38. Brad Lander.
39. Mathieu Eugene (co-sponsor).
40. Darlene Mealy (co-sponsor).
41. Inez Barron.
42. Vincent Gentile.
43. David G. Greenfield.
44. Jumaane D. Williams.
45. Alan N. Maisel.
46. Mark Treyger.
47. Chaim M. Deutsch.
48. Deborah Rose.
49. Steven Matteo.
50. Joseph C. Borelli.
Sample letters.   Feel free to use these or write your own letter. Send to 250 Broadway. NYC, NY 10007
Your name
Address
New York City, New York (zipcode)
Dear City Council Member __________,
I call on you to support INTRO 800 which would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City properties, including parks. This important legislation is so important in protecting our health. Eliminating toxic pesticides in parks and other public spaces will also protect our water waterways from toxic runoff.
I urge you to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.
Sincerely,       __________________________
For children
Your name
Address
New York City, New York (zipcode)
Dear City Council Member ________,
I am a student at ______________________________. I am _____ years old. Please support INTRO 0800 which will ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks, playgrounds, and public spaces. Toxic pesticides are really bad for children. Please co-sponsor INTRO 0800 – 2015.
Sincerely,
___________________
Talking Points for phone calls
Hello. My name is ________________. I’m calling about INTRO 0800, a bill that would ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks and public spaces.
I would like Council member _____________ to co-sponsor INTRO 0800 because:
Pesticides like Roundup have glyphosate which is so dangerous for children, adults, and animals.
Pesticides can get into the water supply.
Add any other points you want to make.
Do you think that Council member __________________ will co-sponsor INTRO 0800?
Thank you very much. (If they are not sure yet, ask them to call you back, or you can agree to call them back.)
If a Council member says, yes, they will co-sponsor INTRO 0800, please let us know at www.intro0800.com.

 
Nov
07
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Keep Fresh

Store Brussels sprouts in a plastic bag in your refrigerator’s crisper, where they’ll keep for at least one week, if not a little longer. Sprouts still on the stalk will stay fresh longer than those sold individually. If you don’t plan on using them right away, stick the stalk in water and put it in the fridge—as you would do with fresh herbs on the stem—then break sprouts off the stalk as needed.

Draw Out Flavors

Steaming or microwaving Brussels sprouts ensures you’ll get the most nutrients from the vegetable, but for many people, taste trumps nutrition. Brussels sprouts can be sliced or shaved thinly and eaten raw, while roasting brings out a robust, sweet, almost nutty flavor. If you want to convert a Brussels sprouts hater, simply toss the sprouts with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and stick them in a 425°F oven for approximately 30 minutes. Alternatively, you can pan-fry sliced sprouts for crunch and texture.

Cook to Perfection

Memories of overcooked Brussels sprouts—mainly boiled—are probably to blame for most people’s dislike of the vegetable, so take care when cooking them. Start by removing any discolored outer leaves. You’ll want to discard any sprouts that are soft. If you’re boiling or steaming, cut an X in the stem so the heat can reach the thicker core. The sprouts should be tender in about five to eight minutes. To roast, cut them in half (or at least the same size) to ensure even cooking.

MAPLE-LEMON SPROUTS

Cook sprouts in any of the ways noted above, but stop cooking a minute or two before they’re done. Drain completely. For about 2 cups of sprouts, whole or sliced, combine teaspoon oil, 1 tablespoon maple syrup, and 1 teaspoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice; heat the mixture in a frying pan. Add the cook sprouts and toss for about 2 minutes.

KALE AND BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD

From the Food network—can also be made with bok choy

3 cups Brussels sprouts

1 large bunch Tuscan kale, center stems discarded

1 small clove garlic

1 small shallot

1 cup finely grated pecorino

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

3 lemons, zested and juiced

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a food processor fitted with a slicing blade, shred the Brussels sprouts. Next, shred the kale. Add the garlic and shallot and shred. (Alternatively, shred and mince the vegetables with a knife.) Set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the pecorino, olive oil, pine nuts, mustard, lemon zest and juice and salt and pepper to taste. Add in the shredded vegetables and toss well to combine. Let the salad sit for 10 minutes before serving to allow the dressing to permeate the greens.

Recipe courtesy of Nancy Fuller

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH GINGER, RAISINS, AND PECANS

(apapted from Real Simple)

preparation 15 minutes cooking 40 minutes

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved

1/2 cup pecans, roughly chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1/4 cup golden raisins, plumped in 1/4 cup water and drained

kosher salt and black pepper

1. Heat oven to 400° F. On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the Brussels sprouts, pecans, oil, garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Turn the Brussels sprouts cut-side down.

2. Roast until golden and tender, 20 to 25 minutes.

3. Toss with the raisins and ginger; serve hot

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND APPLES

1/2 cup diced apple

8 ounces Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered

2 tablespoons apple cider

2 teaspoons olive oil

1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 375°.

2. Combine apple and Brussels sprouts in an 11 x 7–inch baking dish. Add apple cider, olive oil, minced fresh thyme, salt, and freshly ground black pepper; toss well. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until sprouts are tender.

BRUSSELS SPROUT RISOTTO

Yotam Ottolenghi is chef/patron of Ottolenghi and Nopi in London. Serves four as side dish, 2 as main.

This dish is way too complicated for my taste, but some of you mentioned that you like the Jerusalem cookbook and complicated recipes. I haven’t tested it.

1 tbs unsalted butter

2 tbsp olive oil

2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped

2 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

2 tbsp picked thyme leaves

2 lemons, 1 shaved into long strips of zest and 1 finely grated

1/2 cup risotto rice

1 lb trimmed brussels sprouts, half shredded and half quartered

1 cup dry white wine

2 cups vegetable stock

Salt and black pepper

About 1/2 cup sunflower oil

2 tbs parmesan, roughly grated

2 tbs dolcelatte, broken up into roughly 1/4” chunks (or use a different blue cheese)

1/2 tsp tarragon, chopped

2 tsp lemon juice

Put the butter and olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. When the oil is hot and the butter melted, add the onion and fry for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until soft and lightly caramelised. Add the garlic, thyme and lemon strips, and cook for two minutes more. Add the rice and shredded sprouts, and cook for a minute, stirring frequently. Pour over the wine and let it simmer for a minute before you start adding the stock, a teaspoon of salt and a good grind of pepper. Reduce the heat to medium and carry on adding the stock ladle by ladle, stirring often, until the rice is cooked but still retains a bite, and all the stock is used up – about 15-20 minutes.

While the rice is cooking, pour the sunflower oil into a second large saucepan; it should come 2cm up the sides. Place on a high heat and, once very hot, use a slotted spoon to add a handful of the quartered sprouts, making sure they are completely dry first; they will still splutter, so be careful. Fry for less than a minute, until golden and crisp, then transfer to plate lined with kitchen paper. Keep warm while you fry the remaining sprouts.

Add the parmesan, dolcelatte, tarragon and half the fried sprouts to the risotto and stir gently. Serve at once, spooning on the remaining sprouts and topping with the grated lemon zest and a dribble of juice.

While the rice is cooking, pour the sunflower oil into a second large saucepan; it should come 2cm up the sides. Place on a high heat and, once very hot, use a slotted spoon to add a handful of the quartered sprouts, making sure they are completely dry first; they will still splutter, so be careful. Fry for less than a minute, until golden and crisp, then transfer to plate lined with kitchen paper. Keep warm while you fry the remaining sprouts.
Add the parmesan, dolcelatte, tarragon and half the fried sprouts to the risotto and stir gently. Serve at once, spooning on the remaining sprouts and topping with the grated lemon zest and a dribble of juice.


 
Nov
07
    
Posted (Lori) in News

THANKSGIVING RECIPES

BUTTERNUT SQUASH AND CIDER BISQUE:

from Recipes from America’s Small Farms, p. 160. I always feel like I’m a better cook when I make this soup. It has a hint of curry, which adds more flavor than most squash soups. It can be made in advance and is a good way to start the Thanksgiving meal.

ROASTED GARLIC

Not a real recipe, but I don’t think I’ve used this great tip because we didn’t get garlic until this week. Just slice off the top of a whole, unpeeled garlic bulb, exposing the tops of the cloves. Wrap the whole thing loosely in aluminum foil and place on a  pan in a 400 degree oven. Roast for about 45 minutes, checking every 5 minutes after 30 minutes. You’ll know when it’s ready by poking the tops of the cloves with a toothpick; they will become totally soft. Take the garlic out and allow to cool completely. Garlic becomes stronger and easier to use when roasted. When cool, you can separate the cloves and squirt out the garlic like toothpaste, no need to mash or mince. I sometimes spread the garlic on toast, and add a slice of cheese.

BEETS WITH HORSERADISH CREME FRAICHE

From Christian Shaffer. Los Angeles Times

About 1 pound of beets, red, gold, or Chioggia, quartered if large

1 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar (or balsamic)

3 tbs good-quality olive oil

1/4 teaspoon toasted ground coriander seeds

1 small shallot, minced

1/2 cup creme fraiche—see note below on how to make creme fraiche

1 tablespoons prepared horseradish

1 tablespoons kosher salt, divided

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1 tablespoons fresh chervil or parsley, whole leaves or rough chopped

1. Boil the beets in enough water to cover, with 1 tablespoon salt, until tender, about an hour.

2. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, oil, coriander and shallot and set the mixture aside for 30 minutes. In another bowl, combine the creme fraiche, horseradish, one-quarter teaspoon salt and pepper and set aside.

3. Drain the beets and, while still warm, peel them. Slice them into wedges, about 8 to 10 per beet, and cool.

4. Pour the vinegar mixture over the beets and let stand, covered, at room temperature for an hour. Spoon the horseradish cream onto a platter, covering the bottom. Using a slotted spoon, mound the beets over the cream. Garnish the beets with the chervil and serve.

CREME FRAICHE is a lot like sour cream, but better. You can buy it in cartons, but it’s pricey; it’s easy to make and I think the homemade version is better.

Instructions from Epicurious: Combine 1 cup whipping cream and 2 tablespoons buttermilk in a glass container. Cover and let stand at room temperature (about 70°F) from 8 to 24 hours, or until very thick. Stir well before covering and refrigerate up to 10 days.

I know—leaving the cream outside the refrigerator for 8 to 24 hours sounds wrong. But it doesn’t go bad, it gets better.

MASHED POTATOES WITH FRIZZLED LEEKS

I don’t think we need a recipe for mashed potatoes, but in case some of you don’t know—one of the best ways to achieve fluffy mashed potatoes is with a ricer; they cost about $10 and it takes just a few minutes to turn boiled potatoes into the fluffiest, softest mashed potatoes ever.

I like my mashed potatoes plain, with just a bit of butter/cream/milk. But you can also add roasted garlic, olive oil, herbs and spices, or other vegetables. I sometimes boil peeled carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, turnips, winter squash, &/or parsnips (especially parnsips) with potatoes  and then rice them all together.

The frizzled leeks make this a little fancier, and they take just five minutes to make. Slice off the hairy top of the leek and then cut thin horizontal slices—just until after the leek turns from white to pale green. Divide the leek slices into rings Mix 2 tablespoons of flour with 1/4 tsp salt and a pinch of pepper in a shallow bowl or plate; add 1 tablespoon of flour. Mix and add more water,  a little at a time, until you get a thin paste.  Toss the leek rings in the flour paste. Pour a neutral oil into your smallest pot until it comes about 2 inches up the sides. Prepare a slotted spoon and a plate lined with paper towels. Put one leek ring in the pot over medium heat; when it begins to sizzle, toss in the rest of the leek rings. In less than 30 seconds, they will brown and frizzle. Remove the frizzled leeks with the slotted spoon immediately—or they will burn—and drain on the paper towels. Serve over mashed potatoes.

I usually do this right before I serve them, but it can also be done in advance.

CHEF JOHN’S COLCANNON (submitted by Lee’at)

3 large russet potatoes, peeled and quartered

2 tablespoons butter at room temperature

4 ounces kale, trimmed and chopped

1 leek, light parts only, rinsed and chopped

1 bunch green onions, chopped, white and green parts separated

2 tablespoons butter at room temperature

salt and ground black pepper to taste

1/4 cup heavy whipping cream

2 tablespoons butter, for serving

1/4 cup green onions to garnish

Boil potatoes in a large pot of salted water until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and transfer potatoes to a large bowl. Add 2 tablespoons butter and lightly mash the potatoes.

Boil kale and leeks in a large pot of water until tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Drain and transfer kale and leeks to a blender. Add white parts of the green onions and 2 more tablespoons butter; blend until smooth, scraping down sides as needed, 1 to 3 minutes.

Stir pureed kale mixture into the bowl of potatoes and continue to mash. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add cream and stir until desired texture. Top with 2 tablespoons butter and green parts of the green onions.

Chef’s Note: You can substitute kale with other leafy greens such as Swiss chard or cabbage.

PILAF WITH KALE

Adapted from ZAHAV, A World of Israeli Cooking, Michael Solomonov

2 cups jasmine rice

Kosher salt

¼ cup olive oil

½ cup sliced onion

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 cups (packed) finely minced kale

½ tsp. ground pepper

pinch ancho, urfa, or another smokey pepper

2 cups rich chicken stock

1 tbs finely ground lemon zest

Cover the rice by several inches in a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Let soak for at least one hour and up to overnight. Drain well.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. War the oil in a large ovenproof pot with a tight fitting lid over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic. Season with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables just barely begin to soften, about 4 minutes. Add the kale and peppers and cook until the kale is tender, another 5 minutes. Add the rice and cook, stirring until the rice is evenly cooked and begins to lightly toast, about 3 minute more.

Add the chicken stock and lemon zest, raise the heat to high and bring to a simmer. Stir with a fork once or twice, add 1 tsp salt, cover and transfer to the oven, Bake until the rice is cooked through, 15 to 20 minutes. Let stand off the heat, covered for 20 minutes before fluffing the rice with a fork.

PATCHWORK PIE

This one-crust, bottomless pie is great after a big meal; you won’t miss the bottom crust, especially if you’re using sweet local apples. Marc Bittman used stone fuit when he published this recipe in the NYT a few years ago, but I find it makes a great apple pie. I sometimes add cranberries or raisins to the fruit.

8 tablespoons (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into about 8 pieces, more for dish

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, more for rolling

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar

3 cups sliced apples and pears,about  1/4” thick

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 cup brown sugar

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice.

Heat oven to 400 degrees and butter a 9-by-13-inch or similar-size baking dish; set aside. In a food processor, combine 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour, the salt and 1 tablespoon sugar; pulse once or twice. Add butter and turn on machine; process until butter and flour are blended and mixture looks like coarse cornmeal, about 15 to 20 seconds. Slowly add 1/4 cup ice water through feed tube and process until just combined. Form dough into a flat disk, wrap in plastic and freeze for 10 minutes or refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. (You can refrigerate dough for up to a couple of days, or freeze it, tightly wrapped, for up to a couple of weeks.)

NOTE: I find that this is enough for two pie crusts. I divide the dough into two discs, and if I’m not making two pies, I freeze one).

2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl toss fruit with remaining flour, white and brown sugar, cinnamon. and lemon juice; place in baking dish.

3. Put dough on a floured board or countertop and sprinkle with more flour. Roll dough into a 12-inch round, adding flour and rotating and turning dough as needed. Cut dough into 3-inch-wide strips, then cut again crosswise into 4-inch-long pieces. Scatter pieces over fruit in an overlapping patchwork pattern.

4. Brush top of dough lightly with water and sprinkle with remaining tablespoon sugar. Transfer to oven and bake until top is golden brown and juices bubble, 35 to 45 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool; serve warm or at room temperature.

Yield: 6 to 8 servings.

I was looking for new recipes and realized I haven’t used two of my very favorites this year. Both of  these are perfect anytime, but I usually make them on Thanksgiving Day and we snack on them as we work on the big meal.

BAGNA CAUDA

The name means “hot bath” and the only challenging part of this incredibly flavorful recipe is keeping it warm. I sometimes serve it right off the stovetop; it’s a great snack for the cooks or for guests who hang around the kitchen. For later in the meal, I put a small oven-safe bowl on a tiny hotplate that’s used to keep coffee cups warm.

1 tbs butter

1/4 cup olive oil

4-5 cloves garlic, finely minced or crushed

2-3 anchovy filets, mashed or more to tate

splash of cream (optional)

vegetables and/or bread for dipping

Put the butter and oil in a very small saucepan over low heat. When the butter is melted add the garlic and let it cook, stirring occasionally and watching to make sure it doesn’t burn.It should simmer, but not come to a full boil It will be very fragrant and in about 5 minutes the garlic will be soft. Add the anchovies and keep stirring until they all but disappear. If you wish, add a bit a cream and stir again to combine. Serve hot, with crudités such as asparagus, celery sticks, carrots, turnips, and cauliflower, or bread (usually, people ignore the vegetables and go for the bread).

FOCACCIA

This is one of those Eureka recipes. Simple, fast, versatile, delicious. There’s no salt in the dough, which is why it rises so quickly. It’s finished in about an hour, start to ready-to-eat with only about 15 minutes of active prep time.

It’s fine plain—but toppings turn it into a delicious full meal. Try it with ratatouille; braised greens; anchovies and cheese; olives and capers; carmelized onions. The topping should be warm or hot when spread; after spreading the topping, you can put it back into a warm oven for a few minutes.  I sometimes split the focaccia horizontally and use it for sandwiches, such as egg salad with thinly sliced radish or broiled zucchini, eggplant, pepper, and onion. Focaccia is fine cold and day-old—but not as amazing as it is straight from the oven.

I found this recipe of Allrecipes, just sitting there among all the other recipes that are not as fantastic.

1 tsp white sugar

1 pkg (.25 ounce, 2 ¼ tsp) active dry yeast

1/3 cup warm water

2 cups flour

2 tbs. olive oil

1/2 tsp coarse salt

1. In a small bowl, dissolve sugar and yeast in warm water. Let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.

2. In a large bowl, combine the yeast mixture with flour; stir well to combine. Stir in additional water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until all of the flour is absorbed. When the dough has pulled together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly for about 1 minute.

3. Lightly oil a large bowl, place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 30 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 475 degrees F (245 degrees C).

5. Deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface; knead briefly. Pat or roll the dough into a sheet and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Brush the dough with oil and sprinkle with salt.

6. Bake focaccia in preheated oven for 10 to 20 minutes, depending on desired crispness. If you like it moist and fluffy, then you’ll have to wait just about 10 minutes. If you like it crunchier and darker in the outside, you may have to wait 20 minutes.