Sep
30
    
Posted (Lori) in News

TURNIPS

You can use turnips pretty much like potatoes—boil them, steam them, roast them, mash them. One difference is that turnip greens, especially greens from young turnips (and Debbie’s note indicates that these are pretty young) are delicious, cooked like spinach and other greens. Another difference is that turnips can be eaten raw and make great crudités. Cut off the rough tops and greens, peel them and you’re set.

Debbie’s recipe for CREAMY TURNIP SOUP is in Recipes from America’s Small Farm, p. 189. It’s much better when made with vegetable or chicken stock instead of water—but the stock can be the water in which you cooked other root vegetables for Multi-root Mash.

MULTI-ROOT MASH

Mashed turnips are nice; just boil or steam them, add milk, butter, and your favorite herbs and spices and mash like potatoes. But even better: turnips mashed with other root vegetables.

2 tablespoons butter or olive oil

1 leek or onion, sliced thinly

4 cups of roughly chopped root vegetables—turnips, potatoes, beets, carrots, celeriac, parsnips; winter squash and sweet potatoes can also be added.

6 cups water

Salt and pepper to taste

Cheese or sour cream to taste

Chopped chives or other herbs

Melt the butter or oil in a large saucepot. Saute the leek/onion until very soft over medium heat. Then add the chopped vegetables and toss with the butter/oil and softened leek/onion for a minute or two. Add the water and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 30-40 minutes until all the vegetables are very soft. Allow to cool slightly, then pour off most of the water—don’t discard, save it to use as stock, leaving about 1 cup with the vegetables. Transfer to a blender/food processor or use a stick blender to puree until smooth. Or, if you prefer, mash the whole thing with a potato masher.

Add salt and pepper to taste. If you like, add cheese or sour cream and sprinkle with chives or other herbs.

SOUP: To turn this into a soup, add milk or cream until you achieve desired consistency; serve with croutons.

The Best Ever Turnips

4 Reviews

Recipe Courtesy of Michelle Urvater, The Food Network

2 pounds white turnips, peeled and cut into 1/2 inch pieces

6 tablespoons butter

4 cloves garlic, peeled

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Bring a lot of salted water to a boil and parboil the turnips for 7 minutes; add the garlic and boil 1 minute longer; drain.

Melt 4-5 tablespoons of butter and cook the garlic and turnips, covered, over low heat for 5 minutes.

Transfer turnips and garlic to a food processor and puree until smooth, adding 4 more tablespoons butter with the machine turned on. Season well with salt and pepper and, if made in advance, reheat in a double boiler.

OVEN-BAKED TURNIP FRIES

1 pound turnips, (about 2 medium), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch wedges

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Coarse salt and ground pepper

1/4 cup grated Parmesan (1/2 ounce)

Preheat oven to 475 degrees. On a rimmed baking sheet, combine turnips, cayenne, nutmeg, and oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss well to coat. Sprinkle with Parmesan and toss gently to combine. Arrange turnips in a single layer and roast until golden on both sides, 25 to 30 minutes, flipping halfway through.

TURNIPS WITH PANCETTA AND SESAME SEEDS

From Dan Barber (Stone Barn and Blue Hill) and Bon Apetit

2 large turnips (each about 8 ounces); or, if you are using smaller ones, cut into halves or quarters instead of eighths.

1/2 cups white sesame seeds

1 large egg

16 very thin slices pancetta (about 1/4 pound)

Vegetable oil (for deep-frying)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Peel the turnips and each cut into 8 wedges. Place the sesame seeds in a medium bowl; whisk the egg in another medium bowl to blend.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Wrap 1 pancetta slice around each turnip wedge, covering most of turnip. Dip each pancetta-wrapped turnip wedge into beaten egg to coat, then dip into sesame seeds, coating generously on all sides. Set aside on wax paper.

Heat 2 inches of vegetable oil in a heavy medium saucepan. Attach a deep-fry thermometer to the side of the pan and heat the oil to 350°F. Working in batches, add sesame-coated turnip wedges to oil, and deep-fry until sesame seeds are golden, about 1 minute (turnips will be very crunchy).

Transfer turnips to paper towels to drain, then arrange on a rimmed baking sheet and bake just until they are beginning to soften, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and divide among 4 plates.

HERE

Transfer turnips to paper towels to drain, then arrange on a rimmed baking sheet and bake just until they are beginning to soften, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper and divide among 4 plates.


 
Sep
23
    
Posted (Lori) in News

VEGETALBE STOCK:

The vegetables we are getting this week, along with a few leftovers from last week, will make a great vegetable stock. Using stock instead of water in soups and to cook other vegetables gives everything a more complex taste. There are many variations of vegetable stocks; this is a simple one that works:

1 tablespoon olive oil or butter

1 garlic clove, diced

1 medium onion or 2 shallots, chopped

2 large carrots, peeled and sliced

2 large celery stalks, with leaves, chopped

2 potatoes

Other possible additions: parsnip, turnip, squash

2-4 tablespoons chopped herbs, any combination

Salt and pepper to taste (or leave out the salt and pepper, and add when you use the stock in recipes)

Heat the oil in a large pot; add the garlic and sauté until it is fragrant.

Add the onion/shallot, carrots, and celery and stir until they begin to soften, about 5 minutes (Onions, carrots, and celery cooked this way are called mirepoix; they are sometimes added to soups and stews as flavor enhancers.) Add 4 quarts of water; continue to cook, covered, for about an hour, over medium heat until all the vegetables are soft. Then add the potato and cook for another hour.

Check every 30 minutes or so; if scum forms on the top, skim it off. If water evaporates, add more.

Add the herbs and salt and pepepr, taste and adjust. Allow to cool, then strain. I think the cooked vegetables can be used—but I usually toss them. Store the strained stock—some people strain a few times to get the clearest stock possible, but I’m not that fussy—in tightly closed containers. It will last a couple of weeks in the fridge, a couple of months in the freezer.

MIREPOIX AND OTHER FLAVOR BOOSTERS (adapted from MYGOURMETCONNECTION
.com)

Basic Version

The standard mirepoix recipe calls for two parts onion to one part each celery and carrot.  I’m working on a piece about basic soups and stews for next week—these flavor enhancers can be used for all of them.

A small quantity of tomato paste is frequently added for color and flavor if the mirepoix is intended for brown stocks, sauces or stews. For white sauces, leeks are generally substituted for the carrot.

Technique

It’s important to dice the vegetables as uniformly as possible to ensure even cooking. The size of the dice can vary according to overall cooking time of the dish for which it is intended. The shorter the cooking time the smaller the dice.

Cooking the vegetables in butter over a relatively low heat until they start to give off their juices and the onion turns translucent is called sweating. If you cover your pan during cooking, the process is then called smothered.

For rich flavor and deep color, prepare your mirepoix as follows: Start your onions and carrots first and cook until they begin to brown. Add the celery and continue cooking until it softens and its color becomes a brighter green. Stir in a small amount of tomato paste and cook until the entire mixture develops a rich brown color. This technique is referred to as pincage.

Beyond French Cuisine

There are a number of international variations on the French mirepoix. The Cajun trinity substitutes green pepper for the carrot and is used to flavor dishes like gumbos and etouffees.

The Italians have a similar combination called soffritto. They substitute olive oil for the butter and often add garlic and some pancetta or prosciutto to the mix. A Spanish sofrito consists of onions, tomatoes, garlic and parsley cooked in olive oil.

In Cajun cooking, a sweet pepper is added to the mix; hot peppers are sometimes added as well.

The concept is also used in the cuisines of Asia. Many Indian dishes start with a combination of onion, garlic, ginger and some variety of hot pepper. In Thailand, curry pastes begin with a combination of lemongrass, shallots and chiles. The list could go on and on.

Worth the Effort

In summary, the little extra time it takes to introduce a base of aromatic vegetables to your finished dishes can make a world of difference in the overall depth of flavor.

Here’s Lee’at’s favorite kale recipe:

My favorite kale salad is very simple: slice lacinato kale very thin, pour on some olive oil, then massage the kale for a minute until it is softer and shiny. Add lemon juice, salt, a little minced onion or shallot, and crumbled feta cheese.


 
Sep
16
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BEETS

This week’s recipes are beet-centered.. Many members tell us that they never liked beets until they tasted the ones from Stoneledge. If you thought you didn’t like beets, try the ones in your share and you may change your mind

The easiest way to cook beets is to cut off the tops and bottoms, wrap them loosely in foil—I wrap a bunch, some people say it’s better to do each beet separately—and roast them in the oven (375-400 degrees). If they’re very big, cut them into halves or quarters. I find that they are sometimes done (soft when you poke them) in as little as 30 minutes, but sometimes take up to 90 minutes. I just keep checking them; the only constant I find is that if I am in a hurry and need them to be done fast, they take longer. Once they’re soft, the skins peel off easily.

Other ways of cooking: peel and boil them; peel and steam them; slice and broil them.

They can also be microwaved; there are detailed instructions here:

http://www.healthy-beets.com/fresh-beets.html

And beets are delicious raw—crunchy and tasty. I wouldn’t serve whole raw beets, but grated or slivered, they are excellent additions to salads and slaws. They’re too messy to use as crudités—pink fingers–but thin slices of raw beet are great in sandwiches and salsas

A few recipes:

The BEETBURGER recipe in Recipes from America’s Small Farms is one of my favorites. It takes a long time and uses lots of dishes (plus the food processor)—but if you make a full recipe you can refrigerate the “batter” for about a week and have fresh beet burgers several times.

Honey Ginger Balsamic Glazed Beets (The Kitchn)

Serves 4-6 as a side dish or 2-4 as a luncheon salad

1 pound medium-sized beets, trimmed and scrubbed (about 6) 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons peeled and chopped ginger 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon honey (optional) basil leaves for garnish

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place beets in an oven-proof pan with sides, such as a cake pan. Splash in about 1/4 cup of water and seal the top with aluminum foil. Place in oven and roast until tender, about 45 minutes. Test by piercing a beet with a sharp knife — it should glide right in.

Remove beets from oven and allow to cook a few minutes, just enough to handle them comfortably. Peel beets using a sharp paring knife, or have a little fun and just slip the skins off using your hands. (A very sensual kitchen experience!) Cold beets won’t peel easily, so be sure to do this while the beets are still warm. Slice beets into chunks. At this point you have the option of refrigerating the beets until you are ready to use them.

Heat the butter over medium heat in a large frying pan and add the ginger. Cook the ginger for a minute or two, just until it becomes fragrant. Add the beets and the balsamic and stir. When the beets are hot and glazed, test for sweetness. Add honey if needed and cook a little longer to glaze. Hint: Adding honey and upping the sweetness of this dish is a good way to introduce beets to the haters.

Remove from heat and serve hot. Alternatively, these beets are also really good served at room temperature as a salad.

BEET AND CABBAGE BORSCHT

1/2 cup dried cannellini or other other small white beans

3 large beets (about 2 lbs.)

2 Tbsp. olive oil, vegetable oil, or butter

1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

1/2 tsp. salt, plus more to taste

2 cloves garlic, minced (optional)

1small  head green, Savoy, or Napa cabbage, cored and thinly sliced or shredded

1  tsp. caraway seeds

4 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable broth

Lemon juice to taste

Plain yogurt or sour cream for garnish (optional)

Fresh chopped dill for garnish (optional)

Put the beans in a large pot and add cold water to cover generously. Bring to a boil, cover, turn off heat, and let sit 1 hour. Drain and return the beans to the pot. Cover again with cold water, bring to a boil, reduce heat to keep a simmer and cook until beans are tender to the bite, about 20 minutes. Drain the beans and set them aside.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F. Wrap the beets in a large sheet of foil, place on a baking sheet, and cook until tender when pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. Let the beets sit until cool enough to handle. Peel them (their skins should slip off easily after being roasted) and grate them on the large-hole side of a box grater. Set aside. (Note: I like the ease of peeling roasted beets, but feel free to peel and grate raw beets – they will cook quickly enough in the soup.)

In a large pot over medium-high heat add oil, onions, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, if using, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the cabbage, stir to combine, and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage wilts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the caraway seeds and beets. Stir to combine and add the broth or water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to maintain a steady simmer, add beans, and cook until vegetables are tender and flavors blend, 15 to 20 minutes.

Add salt and lemon juice to taste. Serve hot, with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream and a sprinkle of dill, if you like.

Makes 8 generous servings.

WARM BEETS AND GREENS (adapted from EATING WELL)

8 cups greens (chard, kale, collard, spinach, etc.) torn into pieces or sliced into ribbons

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 cup thinly sliced onion

2 plum tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons sliced Kalamata olives

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1 clove garlic, minced

2 cups steamed beet wedges, or slices, 1/2-1 inch thick

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

]

Place greens in a large bowl.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until starting to soften, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, olives, parsley and garlic and cook, stirring, until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 3 minutes. Add beets, vinegar, salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until the beets are heated through, about 1 minute more. Add the greens to the beet mixture toss over low heat until combined and greens wilt sightly. Serve warm.

ROASTED BEET, PEACH, and GOAT CHEESE SALAD (Allrecipes)

2 beets, scrubbed

1 bunch arugula, rinsed and dried; or a mixture of mesclun

2 fresh peaches – peeled, pitted, and sliced

2 shallots or one small sweet onion, chopped

1/4 cup pistachio nuts or toasted almonds, chopped

1 (4 ounce) package goat cheese, crumbled

1/4 cup walnut oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Wrap beets in foil, and place onto a baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven until the beets are tender. Allow the beets to cool slightly, then remove the skins. Let the beets cool to room temperature, or refrigerate until cold. Once cooled, thinly slice the beets.

Place the greens into a large mixing bowl. Add the sliced beets and peaches; sprinkle with the onions, nuts, and goat cheese. In a separate bowl, whisk together the walnut oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper until emulsified, and pour over the salad mixture. Toss well, and serve.

SPICY BEET, ONION, and WALNUT SALAD

Adapted from Jerusalem—and simplified.

About 1 cup cooked beets, cut into wedges

About 2 cups salad greens—arugula, lettuce, mache, watercress, etc.

1 small onion or leek, sliced into rings and lightly sauted

2 tablespoons of your favorite herbs—basil, parsley, cilantro

Dressing:

1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted (or other nuts)

2 tablespoons crushed garlic or garlicscape

¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes (more or less to taste)

¼ cup cider vinegar

3 tbs. oil—if you have walnut oil, mix 1 tbs walnut oil with 2 tbs olive oil.,

Toss the beets, greens, onions/leeks, and herbs. Mix the dressing ingredients and pour over the salad.

ROSH HASHANAH

Only a fraction of our members celebrate the Jewish New Year; but I think the recipes are useful—and I for one like to hear about other people’s traditions. If anyone has recipes from other cultures, please send them. Our CSA is very diverse—I once counted 16 nationalities among our members—and it would be nice to share.

Rosh Hashanah, for most, means sweet food. Symbolism is big in Jewish and sweet foods symbolize the desire for a sweet year. But it doesn’t stop with sweet. The Talmud, in a rare show of humor, established a series of puns involving food and suggested including them in Rosh Hashanah meals. For example—the word for “carrots” in Yiddish is mirren, which sound like the word for “increase.” So when you eat a dish with carrots, you say: May it be the will of god that our fortunes will increase in the New Year.” The wordplay involves beets, leeks, cabbage, carrots, apples, gourds/squash, dates, and fish heads, but there’s no reason not to create your own based on English rather than Hebrew or Yiddish words. There are recipes for beets (may our enemies be beaten) above; here is one for leeks and one for sweet peppers. And a recipe from stuffed cabbage (may the new year be stuffed with joy). And finally a tomatillo chicken soup, because . . . well, chicken soup is often served on Rosh Hashanah and we have a lot of tomatillos.

CHICKPEA & LEEK PANCAKES

3/4 cup chickpeas

1/4 cup leek

1 egg

bunch of cilantro

salt + pepper

Optional: You can add a tablespoon of flour if you prefer more of a ‘pancakey’ texture, I prefer them sans flour.

Chop the chickpeas, leek and cilantro

Combine all three into a bowl and stir in one whisked egg

Add salt + pepper (and the flour if you wish)

Add a small drizzle of your preferred oil to a fry pan and spoon tablespoon amounts into the pan (this recipe will make 5 or 6 fritters)

Cook each side until golden and serve with a squeeze of lemon or lime or even a bit of Greek yoghurt

PEPPERS WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS

2-3 peppers (any color; our big bell peppers count as 2); quartered or cut into lay-flat slices

2 tbs olive oil

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1 ounce slivered almonds

2 tbs honey

2 tbs sherry wine vinegar

2 tbs fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat broiler to high.

Place peppers skin side up in a single layer and broil for 5-10 minutes till charred. Remove to a paper bag to steam and cool. When cool enough remove skin and discard.  Slice into bite size pieces.

In a large pan, heat oil and add garlic for about 3 minutes add almond for 1 minute add honey and vinegar mixing in, Pour over peppers and garnish with parsley season with salt and pepper. Serve room temperature.

Halupkis: Stuffed Cabbage

2 large cabbage heads, coarse outer leaves removed

2 cups rice, uncooked

2 medium onions, diced

3 pounds ground lean beef

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, ground

2 teaspoons salt

4 eggs, beaten

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

1 (14.5 ounce) can tomato sauce (or fresh tomato sauce)

1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth (or fresh chicken soup)

1 can chopped tomatoes

1 chopped hot pepper—remove seeds to adjust heat

Remove the center core of each head of cabbage. Place in large pot of boiling water. Boil until soft, removing each leaf as it softens. Let leaves cool, then trim the thick rib on each leaf. Reserve 14.5 ounces of the cabbage cooking water.

Boil rice in a separate saucepot until half cooked. Drain and set aside.

In a bowl combine beef, partially cooked rice, pepper, salt, eggs, cooked onion-bacon mixture, paprika, and celery salt. Measure the mixture with medium sized ice-cream scoop to make each halupki the same size.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

On each separate cabbage leaf, place 1 scoop of the meat mixture at the bottom of the leaf and roll, tightly tucking the sides to cover the mixture. Line the bottom of a roasting pan (not aluminum) with cabbage leaves that are too dark or to small to use for rolling. Place halupkis in roasting pan, making 2 layers.

Combine tomato sauce, broth, chopped tomatoes, and reserved cooking liquid and pour over halupki. Cover and bake for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more liquid, if needed.

They taste best the next day.

SPICY CHICKEN AND TOMATILLO SOUP

From: What’s Cooking America

2 whole chicken breasts, boneless and skinless 1 pound tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and quartered 1 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced 1 Russet potato, peeled and quartered 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 to 2 fresh jalapeno chile peppers (stems and seeds removed) or according to your taste 4 cups chicken broth or stock 3 cups water Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste 1/4 cup sour cream (optional) 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Prepare Tomatillos: Remove the husks before using, the husks are inedible. Tomatillos are very easy to cook with because they don’t need to be peeled or seeded. Their texture is firm when raw, but soften when cooked. Rinse before using as the tomatillo is covered by a sticky substance. Do not peel the green skin.

In a large soup pot (or cast-iron Dutch oven) over medium heat, add chicken, onion, garlic, tomatillos, potato, oregano, chile pepper, chicken stock, and water; cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce head to low and simmer 20 to 30 minutes until chicken is tender and the meat falls from the bone. Remove chicken from the pot to a bowl or plate and set aside to cool (when cool, take meat from the bones and shred into pieces). Refrigerate cooked chicken until ready to use.

Remove the soup pot from the heat and let the vegetables and broth cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree the vegetable and broth in a blender or food processor.

When ready to serve, reheat the vegetable soup puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until hot. Adjust seasoning if necessary.

To serve, place a small pile of the shredded chicken into each soup bowl. Ladle the pureed soup around the pile of chicken in each bowl. Top each bowl of soup with sour cream and cilantro.

1/4 cup canola oil

1/2 teaspoon sugar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 (15-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained

Directions

Combine the first 6 ingredients in a bowl.

In a separate small bowl, whisk together the rice wine vinegar, canola oil, sugar, and salt and pepper.

Toss all together and let marinate for at up to 8 hours in the refrigerator before serving.

BEETS

This week’s recipes are beet-centered.. Many members tell us that they never liked beets until they tasted the ones from Stoneledge. If you thought you didn’t like beets, try the ones in your share and you may change your mind

The easiest way to cook beets is to cut off the tops and bottoms, wrap them loosely in foil—I wrap a bunch, some people say it’s better to do each beet separately—and roast them in the oven (375-400 degrees). If they’re very big, cut them into halves or quarters. I find that they are sometimes done (soft when you poke them) in as little as 30 minutes, but sometimes take up to 90 minutes. I just keep checking them; the only constant I find is that if I am in a hurry and need them to be done fast, they take longer. Once they’re soft, the skins peel off easily.

Other ways of cooking: peel and boil them; peel and steam them; slice and broil them.

They can also be microwaved; there are detailed instructions here:

http://www.healthy-beets.com/fresh-beets.html

And beets are delicious raw—crunchy and tasty. I wouldn’t serve whole raw beets, but grated or slivered, they are excellent additions to salads and slaws. They’re too messy to use as crudités—pink fingers–but thin slices of raw beet are great in sandwiches and salsas

A few recipes:

The BEETBURGER recipe in Recipes from America’s Small Farms is one of my favorites. It takes a long time and uses lots of dishes (plus the food processor)—but if you make a full recipe you can refrigerate the “batter” for about a week and have fresh beet burgers several times.

Honey Ginger Balsamic Glazed Beets (The Kitchn)

Serves 4-6 as a side dish or 2-4 as a luncheon salad

1 pound medium-sized beets, trimmed and scrubbed (about 6) 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons peeled and chopped ginger 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon honey (optional) basil leaves for garnish

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place beets in an oven-proof pan with sides, such as a cake pan. Splash in about 1/4 cup of water and seal the top with aluminum foil. Place in oven and roast until tender, about 45 minutes. Test by piercing a beet with a sharp knife — it should glide right in.

Remove beets from oven and allow to cook a few minutes, just enough to handle them comfortably. Peel beets using a sharp paring knife, or have a little fun and just slip the skins off using your hands. (A very sensual kitchen experience!) Cold beets won’t peel easily, so be sure to do this while the beets are still warm. Slice beets into chunks. At this point you have the option of refrigerating the beets until you are ready to use them.

Heat the butter over medium heat in a large frying pan and add the ginger. Cook the ginger for a minute or two, just until it becomes fragrant. Add the beets and the balsamic and stir. When the beets are hot and glazed, test for sweetness. Add honey if needed and cook a little longer to glaze. Hint: Adding honey and upping the sweetness of this dish is a good way to introduce beets to the haters.

Remove from heat and serve hot. Alternatively, these beets are also really good served at room temperature as a salad.

BEET AND CABBAGE BORSCHT

1/2 cup dried cannellini or other other small white beans

3 large beets (about 2 lbs.)

2 Tbsp. olive oil, vegetable oil, or butter

1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

1/2 tsp. salt, plus more to taste

2 cloves garlic, minced (optional)

1small  head green, Savoy, or Napa cabbage, cored and thinly sliced or shredded

1  tsp. caraway seeds

4 cups chicken, beef, or vegetable broth

Lemon juice to taste

Plain yogurt or sour cream for garnish (optional)

Fresh chopped dill for garnish (optional)

Put the beans in a large pot and add cold water to cover generously. Bring to a boil, cover, turn off heat, and let sit 1 hour. Drain and return the beans to the pot. Cover again with cold water, bring to a boil, reduce heat to keep a simmer and cook until beans are tender to the bite, about 20 minutes. Drain the beans and set them aside.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F. Wrap the beets in a large sheet of foil, place on a baking sheet, and cook until tender when pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. Let the beets sit until cool enough to handle. Peel them (their skins should slip off easily after being roasted) and grate them on the large-hole side of a box grater. Set aside. (Note: I like the ease of peeling roasted beets, but feel free to peel and grate raw beets – they will cook quickly enough in the soup.)

In a large pot over medium-high heat add oil, onions, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are soft, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, if using, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the cabbage, stir to combine, and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage wilts, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the caraway seeds and beets. Stir to combine and add the broth or water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to maintain a steady simmer, add beans, and cook until vegetables are tender and flavors blend, 15 to 20 minutes.

Add salt and lemon juice to taste. Serve hot, with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream and a sprinkle of dill, if you like.

Makes 8 generous servings.

WARM BEETS AND GREENS (adapted from EATING WELL)

8 cups greens (chard, kale, collard, spinach, etc.) torn into pieces or sliced into ribbons

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 cup thinly sliced onion

2 plum tomatoes, chopped

2 tablespoons sliced Kalamata olives

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

1 clove garlic, minced

2 cups steamed beet wedges, or slices, 1/2-1 inch thick

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

]

Place greens in a large bowl.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until starting to soften, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, olives, parsley and garlic and cook, stirring, until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 3 minutes. Add beets, vinegar, salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until the beets are heated through, about 1 minute more. Add the greens to the beet mixture toss over low heat until combined and greens wilt sightly. Serve warm.

ROASTED BEET, PEACH, and GOAT CHEESE SALAD (Allrecipes)

2 beets, scrubbed

1 bunch arugula, rinsed and dried; or a mixture of mesclun

2 fresh peaches – peeled, pitted, and sliced

2 shallots or one small sweet onion, chopped

1/4 cup pistachio nuts or toasted almonds, chopped

1 (4 ounce) package goat cheese, crumbled

1/4 cup walnut oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Wrap beets in foil, and place onto a baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven until the beets are tender. Allow the beets to cool slightly, then remove the skins. Let the beets cool to room temperature, or refrigerate until cold. Once cooled, thinly slice the beets.

Place the greens into a large mixing bowl. Add the sliced beets and peaches; sprinkle with the onions, nuts, and goat cheese. In a separate bowl, whisk together the walnut oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper until emulsified, and pour over the salad mixture. Toss well, and serve.

SPICY BEET, ONION, and WALNUT SALAD

Adapted from Jerusalem—and simplified.

About 1 cup cooked beets, cut into wedges

About 2 cups salad greens—arugula, lettuce, mache, watercress, etc.

1 small onion or leek, sliced into rings and lightly sauted

2 tablespoons of your favorite herbs—basil, parsley, cilantro

Dressing:

1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted (or other nuts)

2 tablespoons crushed garlic or garlicscape

¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes (more or less to taste)

¼ cup cider vinegar

3 tbs. oil—if you have walnut oil, mix 1 tbs walnut oil with 2 tbs olive oil.,

Toss the beets, greens, onions/leeks, and herbs. Mix the dressing ingredients and pour over the salad.

ROSH HASHANAH

Only a fraction of our members celebrate the Jewish New Year; but I think the recipes are useful—and I for one like to hear about other people’s traditions. If anyone has recipes from other cultures, please send them. Our CSA is very diverse—I once counted 16 nationalities among our members—and it would be nice to share.

Rosh Hashanah, for most, means sweet food. Symbolism is big in Jewish and sweet foods symbolize the desire for a sweet year. But it doesn’t stop with sweet. The Talmud, in a rare show of humor, established a series of puns involving food and suggested including them in Rosh Hashanah meals. For example—the word for “carrots” in Yiddish is mirren, which sound like the word for “increase.” So when you eat a dish with carrots, you say: May it be the will of god that our fortunes will increase in the New Year.” The wordplay involves beets, leeks, cabbage, carrots, apples, gourds/squash, dates, and fish heads, but there’s no reason not to create your own based on English rather than Hebrew or Yiddish words. There are recipes for beets (may our enemies be beaten) above; here is one for leeks and one for sweet peppers. And a recipe from stuffed cabbage (may the new year be stuffed with joy). And finally a tomatillo chicken soup, because . . . well, chicken soup is often served on Rosh Hashanah and we have a lot of tomatillos.

CHICKPEA & LEEK PANCAKES

3/4 cup chickpeas

1/4 cup leek

1 egg

bunch of cilantro

salt + pepper

Optional: You can add a tablespoon of flour if you prefer more of a ‘pancakey’ texture, I prefer them sans flour.

Chop the chickpeas, leek and cilantro

Combine all three into a bowl and stir in one whisked egg

Add salt + pepper (and the flour if you wish)

Add a small drizzle of your preferred oil to a fry pan and spoon tablespoon amounts into the pan (this recipe will make 5 or 6 fritters)

Cook each side until golden and serve with a squeeze of lemon or lime or even a bit of Greek yoghurt

PEPPERS WITH HONEY AND ALMONDS

2-3 peppers (any color; our big bell peppers count as 2); quartered or cut into lay-flat slices

2 tbs olive oil

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1 ounce slivered almonds

2 tbs honey

2 tbs sherry wine vinegar

2 tbs fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat broiler to high.

Place peppers skin side up in a single layer and broil for 5-10 minutes till charred. Remove to a paper bag to steam and cool. When cool enough remove skin and discard.  Slice into bite size pieces.

In a large pan, heat oil and add garlic for about 3 minutes add almond for 1 minute add honey and vinegar mixing in, Pour over peppers and garnish with parsley season with salt and pepper. Serve room temperature.

Halupkis: Stuffed Cabbage

2 large cabbage heads, coarse outer leaves removed

2 cups rice, uncooked

2 medium onions, diced

3 pounds ground lean beef

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, ground

2 teaspoons salt

4 eggs, beaten

1/4 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

1 (14.5 ounce) can tomato sauce (or fresh tomato sauce)

1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth (or fresh chicken soup)

1 can chopped tomatoes

1 chopped hot pepper—remove seeds to adjust heat

Remove the center core of each head of cabbage. Place in large pot of boiling water. Boil until soft, removing each leaf as it softens. Let leaves cool, then trim the thick rib on each leaf. Reserve 14.5 ounces of the cabbage cooking water.

Boil rice in a separate saucepot until half cooked. Drain and set aside.

In a bowl combine beef, partially cooked rice, pepper, salt, eggs, cooked onion-bacon mixture, paprika, and celery salt. Measure the mixture with medium sized ice-cream scoop to make each halupki the same size.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

On each separate cabbage leaf, place 1 scoop of the meat mixture at the bottom of the leaf and roll, tightly tucking the sides to cover the mixture. Line the bottom of a roasting pan (not aluminum) with cabbage leaves that are too dark or to small to use for rolling. Place halupkis in roasting pan, making 2 layers.

Combine tomato sauce, broth, chopped tomatoes, and reserved cooking liquid and pour over halupki. Cover and bake for 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more liquid, if needed.

They taste best the next day.

SPICY CHICKEN AND TOMATILLO SOUP

From: What’s Cooking America

2 whole chicken breasts, boneless and skinless 1 pound tomatillos, husked, rinsed, and quartered 1 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped or minced 1 Russet potato, peeled and quartered 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 to 2 fresh jalapeno chile peppers (stems and seeds removed) or according to your taste 4 cups chicken broth or stock 3 cups water Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste 1/4 cup sour cream (optional) 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Prepare Tomatillos: Remove the husks before using, the husks are inedible. Tomatillos are very easy to cook with because they don’t need to be peeled or seeded. Their texture is firm when raw, but soften when cooked. Rinse before using as the tomatillo is covered by a sticky substance. Do not peel the green skin.

In a large soup pot (or cast-iron Dutch oven) over medium heat, add chicken, onion, garlic, tomatillos, potato, oregano, chile pepper, chicken stock, and water; cover and bring just to a boil. Reduce head to low and simmer 20 to 30 minutes until chicken is tender and the meat falls from the bone. Remove chicken from the pot to a bowl or plate and set aside to cool (when cool, take meat from the bones and shred into pieces). Refrigerate cooked chicken until ready to use.

Remove the soup pot from the heat and let the vegetables and broth cool slightly.

Working in batches, puree the vegetable and broth in a blender or food processor.

When ready to serve, reheat the vegetable soup puree over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until hot. Adjust seasoning if necessary.

To serve, place a small pile of the shredded chicken into each soup bowl. Ladle the pureed soup around the pile of chicken in each bowl. Top each bowl of soup with sour cream and cilantro.

1/4 cup canola oil

1/2 teaspoon sugar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 (15-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained

Directions

Combine the first 6 ingredients in a bowl.

In a separate small bowl, whisk together the rice wine vinegar, canola oil, sugar, and salt and pepper.

Toss all together and let marinate for at up to 8 hours in the refrigerator before serving.


 
Sep
02
    
Posted (Lori) in News

WEEK 13 RECIPES AND TIPS: Tomatillos, Sage, Chilis Rellenos

PREPARING TOMATILLOS—Adapted From Mariquita Farms

Before using, peel off the husks and rinse to remove the sticky residue. Other than peeling off the husk, do not peel the green skin.

Raw – Uncooked tomatillos add a fresh, tangy citrus-like flavor and are often used raw in Mexican table sauces. Finely dice or puree them.

Blanching – Mellows the flavor. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the whole tomatillos (husks removed and rinsed) and boil for about 5 minutes, until soft. Drain and crush or puree as directed in a sauce recipe.
:
Roasting/broiling: – Leaving slightly blackened skins on enriches a sauce with a smoky, woodsy flavor. Tomatillos can be roasted under the broiler, or over an open flame such as a grill or a gas burner. Make sure the heat is quite hot, otherwise the tomatillos will turn mushy before being charred.

Broiling Tomatillos FROM Chili Pepper Madness;

Peel off the outer brown skin that wraps the tomatillos and discard. Rinse the tomatillos and slice them in half. the horizontal center (not up and down) and arrange on a large baking dish. Spray or brush with oil. Place the tray in the oven, on a rack that is close to, but not touching, the flame. Broil about 8 minutes, then flip the tomatillos. Broil another 5 minutes until skin side is blistering. Remove, cool and peel.

NOTE: The tomatillos will be very soft at this point, so peel directly over your mixing bowl. Also, if you prefer to bake instead of broil, preheat oven to about 400 degrees, then bake about 20 minutes. Then proceed. They will not char, but they will be just as good.

TOMATILLO SALSA VERDE (From The Great Salsa Book by Mark Miller)

Alice Nicola sent the following recipe for salsa verde, which she’s made many times: With no pre-cooking of the tomatillos, this can be done in a matter of minutes. If you keep all the seeds in the Serrano chilis, this is going to be very, very hot—I’d remove all but a few of the seeds unless you like it scorching.

1 pound tomatillos (about 12-15), husked, rinsed, and roughly chopped

3 serrano chiles, with seeds

3/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves (a bunch)

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon salt

Place all the ingredients in a food processor or blender, and puree.

Serving suggestions: An all-purpose salsa verde: especially with seafood, chicken, and rice.

Yield: About 2 cups

TOMATILLO-AVOCADO GUACAMOLE (adapted from “What’s Cooking America”)

Prep time: 20 min

1 large jalapeno chile pepper, washed and dried*

1 serrano or other chile pepper, washed and dried*

4 tomatillos, husked and rinsed**

1 large tomato, seeds removed

1 small red onion

1 clove garlic, peeled

1/2 bunch fresh cilantro, stems removed and discarded

Juice of a freshly-squeezed limes

2-3 large ripe avocados, peeled, seed removed, and diced

1 tablespoons salt or to taste

* You can adjust the amount of chile peppers according to your taste—or remove seeds to adjust heat.

Preheat the broiler of your oven.

Warning: Always wear gloves when working with hot chile peppers (fresh, dried or roasted chiles). Never touch your eyes when working with chile pppers. Please don’t learn this lesson the hard way!

Place chili peppers, tomatillos, tomatoes, onion, and garlic clove on a baking sheet in a single layer; broil 3 to 5 minutes on each side until blackened. Remove from oven.

To roast and steam chile peppers. Place the blackened hot chile peppers in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap or an airtight lid, and allow to steam for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, remove chile peppers. Using a sharp knife, remove stems, skins and seeds (if desired).

Roughly chop tomatillos, tomatos, chile peppers, and onion. Place in food processor or blender and add the garlic, cilantro, and lime juice. Pulse until smooth.

Mash the diced avocadoes and combine with the guacamole mixture. Season to taste

and serve with your favorite chips.

TOMATILLO AND LIME JAM
Mermelada de Tomate Verde con Limon
Makes about 1 1/4 cups; from Patti’s Mexican Table

1 lb tomatillos, husks removed, rinsed and roughly chopped
3/4 cups sugar
1/2 cup water
2 tbsp fresh squeezed lime juice
Rind of a small lime, whole or chopped
A pinch of salt

Place all of the ingredients into a saucepan set over medium heat. Let them come to a simmer and stir occasionally, letting them cook until it has thickened and achieved a soft and loose jam consistency, about 35 to 40 minutes.

Don’t wait until it has thickened too much, because it thickens considerably as it cools. Once it has cooled down, pour it into a container, cover tightly and refrigerate.

THINGS TO DO WITH SAGE

Sage has strong medicinal qualities—it’s anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-bacterial. It’s also an anti-coagulant—one website said that people who are taking other anti-coagulants should be warned. It’s also full of antioxidants and vitamin K. And it tastes good.

I’m not including ways to use sage in stuffings, potpourri, sachets—because it’s still summer and there’s not reason to make the house smell like Thanksgving. I’m fairly certain that we’ll get sage again in November.  Most of these are pickups from last year’s piece about sage, but I omitted the potato and carrot bits and added the sage-tomato sauce and the sage-infused butter

1. Sage butter. Chop fresh sage; mash 2 tablespoons into a stick of softened butter and reform the butter.  Use it on bread or muffins or over pasta. You can also add a teaspoon of lemon zest for lemon sage butter—great with fish.

2.  Sage-infused butter. Heat ½ stick butter in a pan. Add 10 to 12 sage leaves and toss for about five minutes; the sage leaves should darken. Remove the sage leaves with a slotted spoon and discard; use the butter over vegetables, meat, poultry, or fish.

3. Sage cream. Melt a stick of butter in a skillet and add 2 tbs chopped sage; sauté for about a minute. Add ¼ cup of light or heavy cream and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Pour over ravioli or other pasta; also good with any seafood.

4. Sage chicken. Before roasting a chicken, stuff its cavity with whole sage leaves, as many as you can fit. Slide a few leaves under the skin. Dress with sage cream.

5. Sage tea. Dry the sage (see below) and crumble it. Put about two tablespoons in a teacup, and pour boiling water over it. Steep for a few minutes, then strain. Add honey, lemon, and/or ginger. Very soothing for a wore throat.

6. Sage omelette. Add 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage to an omelette; Crumble in goat, feta, or other cheese if you wish.

7. Sage-infused vinegar. Add a sprig of sage to a bottle of vinegar and leave overnight. Use the vinegar in salad dressings. There are many sites that suggest infusing oils with sage as well—but there are also reports of botulism in oils that are combined with other ingredients, so I’m staying far away for the subject.

8. Fried sage leaves. Strip the leaves from the stems. Dip them in beaten egg white and then in flour (season the flour with salt and pepper). Heat vegetable oil in a small frying pan; when it’s hot but not smoking, drop the coated leaves into the pan. Fry for about a minute, until they become crispy, then turn and fry the other side. Serve with fish, chicken, or pork, or add to salad, pasta, rice, or other grain dishes.

9. Tomato Sage Sauce—from Good Housekeeping

2 pounds ripe tomatoes

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 small onion, finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 tablespoons butter

1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage

Peel and coarsely chop tomatoes.

In 10-inch skillet over medium heat, in 1 tablespoon hot olive oil, cook onion until golden. Add salt and tomatoes with their juice; over high heat, heat to boiling.

Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes, stirring and mashing tomatoes with spoon occasionally. Stir in butter and sage.

9. Sage and pork. Rub pork chops or roasts with a rub made of chopped sage leaves, salt, and pepper before pan-frying or roasting. The leaves should stick to the meat; if they don’t add a little oil before rubbing them on.

10. Apollo cocktail

1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger. sliced
7 fresh sage leaves
1.5 oz gin
1 egg white
0.75 oz simple syrup
0.5 oz lemon juice
Garnish: 1 dash Angostura bitters, fresh sage leaf

Muddle ginger and 7 sage leaves in mixing glass. Add remaining ingredients and shake without ice. Add ice and shake again. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Top with bitters and single sage leaf.

DRYING SAGE is so simple. Just band together the sprigs you want to dry and hang them upside in a dry place. It will take a few days before they are completely dry and crumbly. Crumble them and store in a tightly-lidded glass jar (if you store in plastic, you’ll have to use the plastic container for sage forever, because the scent is absorbed). Use for tea or in any recipe calling for dried sage.

CHILES RELLENOS

The following recipe for Mexican stuffed peppers claims authenticity.

My own recipe is much less authentic; I use mozzarella as the stuffing, and I shred it and toss it with sautéed onions, garlic and other spices before I put it in the peppers. And instead of coating the peppers with flour and egg, I dip into egg first, and then matzo meal, which is probably hard to find in Mexico. And I use much less oil—I use an 8-inch pan that fits 4-6 peppers and find that about ¼ cup of oil comes about ½ inch up the sides and that’s enough.

6 fresh Anaheim or Ancho peppers

1 (8 ounce) package queso asadero (white Mexican cheese), cut into 3/4-inch thick strips

2 eggs, separated

1 teaspoon baking powder

¾ cup all-purpose flour

1 cup vegetable shortening or oil, for frying

Preheat the oven’s broiler and set the oven rack at about 6 inches from the heat source. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place peppers onto the prepared baking sheet, and cook under the preheated broiler until the skin of the peppers has blackened and blistered, about 10 minutes. Turn the peppers often to blacken all sides. Place the blackened peppers into a bowl, and tightly seal with plastic wrap. Allow the peppers to steam as they cool, about 15 minutes.

Rinse cooled peppers under cold water to peel off the skins, and cut a slit along the long side of each pepper to remove the seeds and core. Rinse the peppers inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Stuff the peppers with strips of the cheese.

Whisk the egg yolks in a bowl with the baking powder. In a second metal bowl, beat the egg whites with an electric mixer until the whites form stiff peaks. Gently fold the beaten egg whites into the yolk mixture. Place flour into a shallow bowl.

Heat the vegetable shortening in a skillet over medium heat. Roll each stuffed pepper in flour, tap off excess flour, and dip the peppers into the egg mixture to coat both sides. Gently lay the coated peppers into the hot shortening. Fry peppers until lightly golden brown and the cheese has melted, about 5 minutes per side.


 
Aug
26
    
Posted (Lori) in News

This week’s veggie list looks like the ingredient list for piperade,  a basque dish that, in it’s classic form, includes ham or prosciutto. But I usually leave out the meat and it’s fine without it. I’ve also included some raw pepper salads—because it’s going to be hot this week—and some kale and cabbage salads that require very brief cooking or none at all.

JULIA CHILD’S PIPERADE (adapted)

6 medium tomatoes

1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons olive oil

4 ounces thinly sliced Bayonne ham (or prosciutto), cut into 1/2-inch squares

2 medium garlic cloves, finely minced

2 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves

1 medium bay leaf

2 medium red bell peppers, cleaned and sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips

2 medium green bell peppers, cleaned and sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips

(the frying peppers and lipstick peppers in our share are fine in this recipe)

2 teaspoons piment d’Espelette (or paprika or cayenne pepper; or chopped hot peppers, with the seeds removed, to taste)

Bring a small pot of water to a boil over high heat. Prepare an ice water bath by filling a medium bowl halfway with ice and water. Using the tip of a knife, remove the stem and cut a shallow X-shape into the bottom of each tomato. Place tomatoes in boiling water and blanch until the skin just starts to pucker and loosen, about 10 seconds. Drain tomatoes and immediately immerse them in ice water bath. Using a small knife, peel loosened skin and cut each tomato in half. With a small spoon, scrape out any seeds and core and coarsely chop the remaining flesh. Set aside.

NOTE FROM LORI: I skip the step above because tomato skins don’t bother me; I just chop the tomatos roughly. Your choice)

Place a large frying pan over medium heat and add 1 tablespoon oil. Once oil shimmers, add Bayonne ham (or prosciutto) and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Remove to a plate with a slotted spoon and reserve.

Return pan to heat, add 2 teaspoons oil, and, once heated, add garlic and onion. Cook, stirring rarely, until soft and beginning to color, about 8 minutes. Stir in herbs and pepper slices and season well with salt. Cover and cook, stirring rarely, until peppers are slightly softened, about 10 minutes.

Stir in diced tomatoes, browned ham, and piment d’Espelette (or paprika or cayenne pepper) and season well with salt. Cook uncovered until mixture melds together and juices have slightly thickened. Serve hot.

AND AN ITALIAN VERSION

PEPERONATA (from The Food Network Kitchen)

1/4 cup olive oil

2 red bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

2 yellow bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

2 orange or green bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

(again—the peppers in our share this week will work fine)

1 large onion, sliced into half-moons

4 garlic cloves, sliced thin

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon sugar

4-5 Roma or other plum tomatoes, seeded and diced

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup fresh basil, leaves torn roughly

Lemon juice

1 Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan on medium high heat. When the oil is almost smoking, add the onions. Sprinkle with a little salt and sauté for 2-3 minutes, until the onions just begin to color.

2 Add the peppers and stir well to combine with the onions. Sauté for 4-5 minutes, stirring often. The peppers should be al dente—cooked, but with a little crunch left in them.

3 Add the garlic, and sauté another 1-2 minutes. Sprinkle a little more salt over everything and add the sugar and dried oregano. Cook 1 minute. Add the diced tomatoes, and cook just one minute further.

4 Turn off the heat and mix in the torn basil. Grind some black pepper over everything. Right before serving squeeze a little lemon juice over the dish.

STUFFED ITALIAN FRYING PEPPERS

from COOKS.COM

1 1/2 to 2 lbs. Italian frying peppers
1 1/4 cup Italian bread crumbs
2-3 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup fresh parsley, minced
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 egg
1/2 tsp each oregano and basil (fresh is best – if using dry, reduce amount to 1/4 tsp)
2-3 cloves finely minced garlic.
pinch of rubbed sage
3-4 anchovies (or to taste)
1 green onion or shallot, minced (optional)

Sauté garlic and green onion or a minced shallot, if using, in olive oil, til very lightly browned (a teaspoon of butter may also be added to speed the browning along). Mash the anchovies using a fork, stirring them into the olive oil.

Add parsley and other herbs, heat for 2 minutes. Add bread crumbs, then quickly mix in an egg which has been beaten (using a fork) with a few tablespoons warm water. Another teaspoon of olive oil may be added, if needed, for a smooth mixture.

Add cheese and mix well; stir in enough warm water to make a mix that can be pressed into the center of the peppers which have had their stems removed, and have been seeded and cored.

Saute the peppers in a skillet with 1/4″ good olive oil with 3-5 peeled whole cloves garlic; turn the garlic to prevent browning. The garlic should just take on a lightly toasted color and will become soft, at which point it can be mashed into the oil and removed (save for spreading this on Italian bread – good before using for Bruschetta!)

The peppers should begin to blacken/brown on one side; turn them several times to distribute the coloring, keeping them always well coated in olive oil. When they appear to be somewhat tender and have streaks of browning, cover pan for 2 minutes and remove from heat. Serve right away, sprinkled with coarse kosher or sea salt.

These same peppers can be made in a similar way, except they are only cored and seeded, but not stuffed. In this case, they are served drizzled with garlic-mashed olive oil in sandwiches made with crusty Italian bread. (A few caramelized onions can also be added but this somewhat detracts from the focus on the pepper flavor).

Either dish is a good Summer meal, relatively light and doesn’t need to be served piping hot. Simply sauteed in olive oil, the plain, unstuffed peppers are very quick and easy to prepare, can be made ahead, and also travel well for picnics.

AVOCADO, GREEN PEPPER AND TOMATO SALAD, from Martha Stewart

Meatless

1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil

Juice of 1/2 lime

1 small garlic clove, minced

Pinch of cayenne pepper

Coarse salt

1 firm, ripe avocado, halved and pitted

1/2 yellow bell pepper, ribs and seeds removed, diced

6 cherry tomatoes, halved

1 scallion, trimmed and thinly sliced

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves, plus whole leaves for garnish

Preparation

1. In a small bowl, whisk together olive oil, lime juice, garlic, and cayenne. Season with salt.

2. Scoop out flesh from avocado halves, reserving shells, and chop. Transfer to a bowl and add bell pepper, tomatoes, scallion, and chopped cilantro.

3. Drizzle with dressing and season with salt. Gently stir to combine. Spoon mixture into reserved shells. Garnish with whole cilantro leaves and serve immediately.

Per serving: 424 calories, 34.63 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 31.25 g carbohydrates, 6.6 g protein, 16.36 g fiber

CABBAGE AND PEPPER SALAD (From Natasha’s Kitchen.com)

Salad Ingredients:

1/2 large or 1 small cabbage

1 yellow or orange or  red bell pepper (or 5-6 mini peppers)

1 small head of broccoli

1/2 cup chopped green onion

Dressing Ingredients:

Juice of 1 small lemon

3 ?bsp sunflower oil (olive oil works too but sunflower is better)

1 ?bsp mayo

1 ?bsp sour cream

1 tsp sugar

1/2  tsp minced garlic

1/2 tsp salt

2 heaping ?bsp dill (fresh or frozen)

2 heaping ?bsp parsley (optional)

For the dressing: In a small bowl mix together juice of 1 small lemon, 3 ?bsp of sunflower oil, 1 ?bsp mayo, 1 ?bsp sour cream, 1 tsp sugar, ½ tsp garlic powder and ½ tsp salt (or just 1 tsp garlic salt), 2 heaping ?bsp chopped dill and 2 heaping ?bsp chopped parsley. Refrigerate dressing and start on the salad.

Wash your veggies. Using a mandoline or a knife, thinly slice 1 small cabbage and place in a large mixing bowl.

Chop 1 small head of broccoli into small peaces.

Cut bell pepper into small strips.

Dice half a bunch of green onions, about ½ cup. Add everything to the mixing bowl.

When ready to serve, pour the prepared dressing over the salad and mix well until all of the veggies are evenly coated with the dressing :) .

CHOPPED CABBAGE AND KALE SALAD

© Todd Porter & Diane Cu

The textures of chopped cabbage and kale work wonderfully together in this quick salad, with chopped walnuts and red bell pepper providing even more crunch.

Slideshow: More Green Salads

6 cups chopped green cabbage

3 cups loosely packed, de-stemmed and chopped kale

1/2 medium red bell pepper, sliced

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Zest of 1 medium lemon

Juice of 1 medium lemon

1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

Fresh cracked black pepper, to taste

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, kale, bell peppers, walnuts and feta cheese.

In another bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Chill and serve.

STIR-FRIED CABBAGE, from All-recipes.com

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 pound shredded cabbage

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon Chinese cooking wine, or another Chinese flavoring, such as Szechuan sauce

Heat the vegetable oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Stir in the garlic, and cook for a few seconds until it begins to brown. Stir in the cabbage until it is coated in oil; cover the wok, and cook for 1 minute. Pour in the soy sauce, and cook and stir for another minute. Increase the heat to high, and stir in the Chinese cooking wine. Cook and stir until the cabbage is tender, about 2 minutes more.

s.

This week’s veggie list looks like the ingredient list for piperade,  a basque dish that, in it’s classic form, includes ham or prosciutto. But I usually leave out the meat and it’s fine without it. I’ve also included some raw pepper salads—because it’s going to be hot this week—and some kale and cabbage salads that require very brief cooking or none at all.

JULIA CHILD’S PIPERADE (adapted)

6 medium tomatoes

1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons olive oil

4 ounces thinly sliced Bayonne ham (or prosciutto), cut into 1/2-inch squares

2 medium garlic cloves, finely minced

2 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves

1 medium bay leaf

2 medium red bell peppers, cleaned and sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips

2 medium green bell peppers, cleaned and sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips

(the frying peppers and lipstick peppers in our share are fine in this recipe)

2 teaspoons piment d’Espelette (or paprika or cayenne pepper; or chopped hot peppers, with the seeds removed, to taste)

Bring a small pot of water to a boil over high heat. Prepare an ice water bath by filling a medium bowl halfway with ice and water. Using the tip of a knife, remove the stem and cut a shallow X-shape into the bottom of each tomato. Place tomatoes in boiling water and blanch until the skin just starts to pucker and loosen, about 10 seconds. Drain tomatoes and immediately immerse them in ice water bath. Using a small knife, peel loosened skin and cut each tomato in half. With a small spoon, scrape out any seeds and core and coarsely chop the remaining flesh. Set aside.

NOTE FROM LORI: I skip the step above because tomato skins don’t bother me; I just chop the tomatos roughly. Your choice)

Place a large frying pan over medium heat and add 1 tablespoon oil. Once oil shimmers, add Bayonne ham (or prosciutto) and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Remove to a plate with a slotted spoon and reserve.

Return pan to heat, add 2 teaspoons oil, and, once heated, add garlic and onion. Cook, stirring rarely, until soft and beginning to color, about 8 minutes. Stir in herbs and pepper slices and season well with salt. Cover and cook, stirring rarely, until peppers are slightly softened, about 10 minutes.

Stir in diced tomatoes, browned ham, and piment d’Espelette (or paprika or cayenne pepper) and season well with salt. Cook uncovered until mixture melds together and juices have slightly thickened. Serve hot.

AND AN ITALIAN VERSION

PEPERONATA (from The Food Network Kitchen)

1/4 cup olive oil

2 red bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

2 yellow bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

2 orange or green bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

(again—the peppers in our share this week will work fine)

1 large onion, sliced into half-moons

4 garlic cloves, sliced thin

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon sugar

4-5 Roma or other plum tomatoes, seeded and diced

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup fresh basil, leaves torn roughly

Lemon juice

1 Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan on medium high heat. When the oil is almost smoking, add the onions. Sprinkle with a little salt and sauté for 2-3 minutes, until the onions just begin to color.

2 Add the peppers and stir well to combine with the onions. Sauté for 4-5 minutes, stirring often. The peppers should be al dente—cooked, but with a little crunch left in them.

3 Add the garlic, and sauté another 1-2 minutes. Sprinkle a little more salt over everything and add the sugar and dried oregano. Cook 1 minute. Add the diced tomatoes, and cook just one minute further.

4 Turn off the heat and mix in the torn basil. Grind some black pepper over everything. Right before serving squeeze a little lemon juice over the dish.

STUFFED ITALIAN FRYING PEPPERS

from COOKS.COM

1 1/2 to 2 lbs. Italian frying peppers
1 1/4 cup Italian bread crumbs
2-3 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup fresh parsley, minced
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 egg
1/2 tsp each oregano and basil (fresh is best – if using dry, reduce amount to 1/4 tsp)
2-3 cloves finely minced garlic.
pinch of rubbed sage
3-4 anchovies (or to taste)
1 green onion or shallot, minced (optional)

Sauté garlic and green onion or a minced shallot, if using, in olive oil, til very lightly browned (a teaspoon of butter may also be added to speed the browning along). Mash the anchovies using a fork, stirring them into the olive oil.

Add parsley and other herbs, heat for 2 minutes. Add bread crumbs, then quickly mix in an egg which has been beaten (using a fork) with a few tablespoons warm water. Another teaspoon of olive oil may be added, if needed, for a smooth mixture.

Add cheese and mix well; stir in enough warm water to make a mix that can be pressed into the center of the peppers which have had their stems removed, and have been seeded and cored.

Saute the peppers in a skillet with 1/4″ good olive oil with 3-5 peeled whole cloves garlic; turn the garlic to prevent browning. The garlic should just take on a lightly toasted color and will become soft, at which point it can be mashed into the oil and removed (save for spreading this on Italian bread – good before using for Bruschetta!)

The peppers should begin to blacken/brown on one side; turn them several times to distribute the coloring, keeping them always well coated in olive oil. When they appear to be somewhat tender and have streaks of browning, cover pan for 2 minutes and remove from heat. Serve right away, sprinkled with coarse kosher or sea salt.

These same peppers can be made in a similar way, except they are only cored and seeded, but not stuffed. In this case, they are served drizzled with garlic-mashed olive oil in sandwiches made with crusty Italian bread. (A few caramelized onions can also be added but this somewhat detracts from the focus on the pepper flavor).

Either dish is a good Summer meal, relatively light and doesn’t need to be served piping hot. Simply sauteed in olive oil, the plain, unstuffed peppers are very quick and easy to prepare, can be made ahead, and also travel well for picnics.

AVOCADO, GREEN PEPPER AND TOMATO SALAD, from Martha Stewart

Meatless

1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil

Juice of 1/2 lime

1 small garlic clove, minced

Pinch of cayenne pepper

Coarse salt

1 firm, ripe avocado, halved and pitted

1/2 yellow bell pepper, ribs and seeds removed, diced

6 cherry tomatoes, halved

1 scallion, trimmed and thinly sliced

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves, plus whole leaves for garnish

Preparation

1. In a small bowl, whisk together olive oil, lime juice, garlic, and cayenne. Season with salt.

2. Scoop out flesh from avocado halves, reserving shells, and chop. Transfer to a bowl and add bell pepper, tomatoes, scallion, and chopped cilantro.

3. Drizzle with dressing and season with salt. Gently stir to combine. Spoon mixture into reserved shells. Garnish with whole cilantro leaves and serve immediately.

Per serving: 424 calories, 34.63 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 31.25 g carbohydrates, 6.6 g protein, 16.36 g fiber

CABBAGE AND PEPPER SALAD (From Natasha’s Kitchen.com)

Salad Ingredients:

1/2 large or 1 small cabbage

1 yellow or orange or  red bell pepper (or 5-6 mini peppers)

1 small head of broccoli

1/2 cup chopped green onion

Dressing Ingredients:

Juice of 1 small lemon

3 ?bsp sunflower oil (olive oil works too but sunflower is better)

1 ?bsp mayo

1 ?bsp sour cream

1 tsp sugar

1/2  tsp minced garlic

1/2 tsp salt

2 heaping ?bsp dill (fresh or frozen)

2 heaping ?bsp parsley (optional)

For the dressing: In a small bowl mix together juice of 1 small lemon, 3 ?bsp of sunflower oil, 1 ?bsp mayo, 1 ?bsp sour cream, 1 tsp sugar, ½ tsp garlic powder and ½ tsp salt (or just 1 tsp garlic salt), 2 heaping ?bsp chopped dill and 2 heaping ?bsp chopped parsley. Refrigerate dressing and start on the salad.

Wash your veggies. Using a mandoline or a knife, thinly slice 1 small cabbage and place in a large mixing bowl.

Chop 1 small head of broccoli into small peaces.

Cut bell pepper into small strips.

Dice half a bunch of green onions, about ½ cup. Add everything to the mixing bowl.

When ready to serve, pour the prepared dressing over the salad and mix well until all of the veggies are evenly coated with the dressing :) .

CHOPPED CABBAGE AND KALE SALAD

© Todd Porter & Diane Cu

The textures of chopped cabbage and kale work wonderfully together in this quick salad, with chopped walnuts and red bell pepper providing even more crunch.

Slideshow: More Green Salads

6 cups chopped green cabbage

3 cups loosely packed, de-stemmed and chopped kale

1/2 medium red bell pepper, sliced

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Zest of 1 medium lemon

Juice of 1 medium lemon

1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

Fresh cracked black pepper, to taste

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, kale, bell peppers, walnuts and feta cheese.

In another bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Chill and serve.

STIR-FRIED CABBAGE, from All-recipes.com

1 taWblespoon vegetable oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 pound shredded cabbage

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon Chinese cooking wine, or another Chinese flavoring, such as Szechuan sauce

Heat the vegetable oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Stir in the garlic, and cook for a few seconds until it begins to brown. Stir in the cabbage until it is coated in oil; cover the wok, and cook for 1 minute. Pour in the soy sauce, and cook and stir for another minute. Increase the heat to high, and stir in the Chinese cooking wine. Cook and stir until the cabbage is tender, about 2 minutes more.

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