Aug
15
    
Posted (Lori) in News

The vegetables we are getting this week, along with a few leftovers from past weeks, will make a great vegetable stock. The celery we get from CSA is not the kind we use as crudités or to stir bloody marys— the stems are thinner, there are more leaves than stems, and the taste is stronger–but it’s perfect for stock.

VEGETABLE STOCK

Using stock instead of water in soups and to cook other vegetables gives everything a more complex taste. There are many variations of vegetable stocks; this is a simple one that works:

1 tablespoon olive oil or butter

1 garlic clove, diced (or garlicscape if you still have some)

1 medium onion or 2 shallots, chopped

2 large carrots, sliced

2 large celery stalks, with leaves, chopped

2 potatoes

Other possible additions: parsnip, turnip, squash

2-4 tablespoons chopped herbs, any combination

Salt and pepper to taste (or leave out the salt and pepper, and add when you use the stock in recipes)

Heat the oil in a large pot; add the garlic and sauté until it is fragrant.

Add the onion/shallot, carrots, and celery and stir until they begin to soften, about 5 minutes (Onions, carrots, and celery cooked this way are called mirepoix; they are sometimes added to soups and stews as flavor enhancers.) Add 4 quarts of water; continue to cook, covered, for about an hour, over medium heat until all the vegetables are soft. Then add the potato and cook for another hour.

Check every 30 minutes or so; if scum forms on the top, skim it off. If water evaporates, add more.

Add the herbs and salt and pepepr, taste and adjust. Allow to cool, then strain. I think the cooked vegetables can be used—but I usually toss them. Store the strained stock—some people strain a few times to get the clearest stock possible, but I’m not that fussy—in tightly closed containers. It will last a couple of weeks in the fridge, a couple of months in the freezer.


 
Aug
15
    
Posted (Lori) in News

For each of these: Cut off the rough ends of the stems. If you’re fussy or if the broccoli is old, use a vegetable peeler to peel off the top layer of the stems. Cut the florets and stems into bite sized pieces. Cook by:

–Dropping into a pot of boiling water for about 2 minutes

–Microwaving (in a microwave-safe dish, with just a few drops of water) for about 2 minutes

–Steaming in a steamer basket over boiling water two to four minutes

–Sauteeing in oil or butter for about 3 minutes

BROCCOLI WITH GINGER, BUTTER, AND NUTS: Melt about 2 tablespoons of butter for 2 cups of broccoli. Mince the ginger finely or grate it so that you have about 2 tsps; add it to the melted butter. Toss all the ingredients together, including the nuts; salt and pepper to taste.

BROCCOLI WITH SHALLOTS AND BLEU CHEESE: Mix ¼ cup sour cream, 1 tablespoon mayonnaise, a squirt of lemon juice, and salt and pepper; add about 1 tbs of crumbled bleu cheese. If you can, leave for several hours before serving. Add to broccoli, with 1 tbs. minced shallot.

BROCCOLI WITH CHILI OIL

1/2 medium jalapeño with most of the seeds and veins removed, minced

1 shallot, minced

1/4 cup peanut, corn, or blended vegetable oil (see Notes)

1 1/2 tablespoons water

1/4 teaspoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

Pinch white pepper

Heat the jalapeno, shallot, and oil in a small saucepan over medium heat for several minutes. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes for flavors to meld. While the oil is still warm, stir in water, sugar, salt, and pepper. When ready to serve, spoon the flavored oil over the broccoli and toss gently.

BROCCOLI GRATIN

Melt 3 tbs butter in a skiller. Add 3 tablespoons flour, stir until full combined. Add 2 cups milk (heat to almost boiling in a microwave first, if you have a microwave). Stir constantly over very low heat until it thickens (this is a basic white/béchamel sauce). Add salt and pepper to taste, and a grating of nutmeg if you like nutmeg. In small baking dish, combine the white sauce with the broccoli; add cheese if you want (cheddar, mozzarella, parmesan, feta, goat—really, anything goes). Sprinkle bread crumbs on top and bake for 15-20 minutes, until the crumbs are golden and the the sauce is bubbly.

BROCCOLI-CHICKPEA SALAD

2 cups broccoli, cooked as above

8-ounce can drained and rinsed chickpeas (or cooked dried chickpeas)

2 sliced scallions

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

3 tbs toasted nuts

1 minced clove garlic

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon honey

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

2 tbs lemon juice

3 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

1      combine the broccoli with the chickpeas, scallions, parsley, and pine nuts.

2      In a bowl, combine garlic, mustard, honey, lemon zest and juice. Slowly add oil, whisking to emulsify, and season with salt and pepper.

3      Drizzle broccoli mixture with dressing and adjust seasoning.

SESAME BROCCOLI

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet. Add 1 tbs. chopped garlic, 2 tbs. chopped onion and sauté until soft. Add the pre-cooked broccoli and toss over low heat until coated with oil. Add 1 teaspoon sesame oil and toss again. Remove from heat. Add ¼ cup tahini paste and stir to combine. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds and serve hot.


 
Aug
15
    
Posted (Lori) in News

GAZPACHOS

I think “my” gazpacho is the best one around; it’s from Anna Thomas’ Vegetarian Epicure, one of the books that inspired me (and millions of others in the 1970s) to cook and eat more vegetables. The recipe require a bit of cooking—to set the eggs that makes it richer and thicker than most gazpachos—but the short cooking time doesn’t steam up the house. I’m also including a link to the many gazpachos that Mark Bittman listed in NYT’s magazine a few years back and the Julia Moskin’s Seville gazpacho article from last year.

BITTMAN’S GAZPACHO’S

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/08/03/magazine/bittman-gazpacho-the-simple-chilled-soup.html?ref=magazine

MOSKIN’S GAZPACHO

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017577-best-gazpacho

GAZPACHO FROM THE VEGETARIAN EPICURE

Peel, seed and chop:

1 small onion

1 cucumber

1 bell pepper

3 ripe tomatoes—original recipe calls for peeling them–you decide)

1 chili pepper or hot sauce to taste

Blend vegetables in blender and add:

2 eggs

1/3 C olive oil

¼ C vinegar

1 C tomato juice

2 tbs tomato paste

2 cloves garlic, raw or roasted

2 T lemon juice

1-2 T brown sugar

At this point, the gazpacho is heated before it’s chilled, the eggs set slightly and the soup takes on a thick and layered flavor.

Pour the mixture from the blender into a heavy-bottom pot and heat very slowly, stirring with a wire whisk for 3 or 4 minutes. Take it off the heat and continue stirring occasionally as it cools.

Let cool, then chill until ready to serve (it can be made several hours in advance, or even a day in advance and stored in a tightly closed jar in the refrigerator. Just before serving, add

2 T mayonnaise

Whir the soup in the blender to combine thoroughly.

Serve chilled, garnished with colorful chopped tomato or red pepper or croutons.

GAZPACHSICLES

Another way to serve gazpacho: puree it until it’s very smooth and thin it to the consistency of thick tomato sauce. You might want to increase the sugar and lemon a bit—freezing tones down the tastes. Then pour into popsicle trays—you don’t need an ice cream maker for these, the trays cost under $5—and freeze until very firm. Pop them out—kids love them!


 
Aug
08
    
Posted (Lori) in News

BROILING PEPPERS

A lot of you probably already know about broiled peppers, but if you’ve never done it, it’s going to be a revelation. The big, meaty peppers we’re getting this week are perfect for broiling. Red and yellow ones are best, but even green peppers take on a whole new level of sweetness when broiled. For some reason, these are often called roasted peppers, even when they are cooked in the broiler. Some people achieve the same effect by holding the pepper over an open flame and turning it until it chars; I always burn my fingers when I try to do it that way.

Broiling peppers is easy. Cut them in half, scoop out the seeds and flatten them slightly. Place them on a cookie sheet, skin side up, close but not touching. Place them under a broiler—close to the flame but not touching. Broil for about 5 minute, then keep checking them. When the skin is black and blistered, take them out and let them cool. The skin will peel off easily, The flesh is now soft and juicy. I eat these just as they are; some people toss them with oil and vinegar. They’re a great side dish all by themselves, but also can be added to salads, soups, and pasta. Pureed, with a little cream, they’re an amazing dip. Thin it a little, and you have a soup that is incredibly flavoful, low-cal, and low-cost

Broiled peppers—or the dips and soups—freeze well. The texture is not as good when they’re thawed, but they’re still fine for pureeing.

BROILED PEPPER DIP—makes about ½ cup

Flesh from two large peppers—red, green, yellow, or a mixture

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 tablespoon vinegar—red, balsamic, or any flavorful vinegar

2 tablespoons sour cream

Salt and cayenne pepper to taste

Put everything into a food processor and pulse until smooth.

VARIATIONS:

–Add capers or olives before you puree or chop them into the finished dip

–Add a handful of chopped nuts, either before or after pureeing

–Season with soy sauce or Worcestershire sauce

–Add chopped garlic or chives (even leeks or onions); herbs such as thyme, basil and summer savory are also good additions

–Thin with milk, cream, or vegetable stock to make a soup; serve hot or cold, with croutons or chopped vegetables.

JULIA CHILD’S PIPERADE (adapted)

6 medium tomatoes

1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons olive oil

4 ounces thinly sliced Bayonne ham (or prosciutto), cut into 1/2-inch squares

2 medium garlic cloves, finely minced

2 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

1 tablespoon chopped thyme leaves

1 medium bay leaf

2 medium red bell peppers, cleaned and sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips

2 medium green bell peppers, cleaned and sliced lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips

2 teaspoons piment d’Espelette (or paprika or cayenne pepper; or chopped hot peppers, with the seeds removed, to taste)

Bring a small pot of water to a boil over high heat. Prepare an ice water bath by filling a medium bowl halfway with ice and water. Using the tip of a knife, remove the stem and cut a shallow X-shape into the bottom of each tomato. Place tomatoes in boiling water and blanch until the skin just starts to pucker and loosen, about 10 seconds. Drain tomatoes and immediately immerse them in ice water bath. Using a small knife, peel loosened skin and cut each tomato in half. With a small spoon, scrape out any seeds and core and coarsely chop the remaining flesh. Set aside.

NOTE FROM LORI: I skip the step above because tomato skins don’t bother me; I just chop the tomatos roughly. Your choice)

Place a large frying pan over medium heat and add 1 tablespoon oil. Once oil shimmers, add Bayonne ham (or prosciutto) and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Remove to a plate with a slotted spoon and reserve.

Return pan to heat, add 2 teaspoons oil, and, once heated, add garlic and onion. Cook, stirring rarely, until soft and beginning to color, about 8 minutes. Stir in herbs and pepper slices and season well with salt. Cover and cook, stirring rarely, until peppers are slightly softened, about 10 minutes.

Stir in diced tomatoes, browned ham, and piment d’Espelette (or paprika or cayenne pepper) and season well with salt. Cook uncovered until mixture melds together and juices have slightly thickened. Serve hot.

AND AN ITALIAN VERSION

PEPERONATA (from The Food Network Kitchen)

1/4 cup olive oil

2 red bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

2 yellow bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

2 orange or green bell peppers, seeded, sliced into 2 1/2 to 3-inch long strips

(again—the peppers in our share this week will work fine)

1 large onion, sliced into half-moons

4 garlic cloves, sliced thin

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon sugar

4-5 Roma or other plum tomatoes, seeded and diced

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup fresh basil, leaves torn roughly

Lemon juice

1 Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan on medium high heat. When the oil is almost smoking, add the onions. Sprinkle with a little salt and sauté for 2-3 minutes, until the onions just begin to color.

2 Add the peppers and stir well to combine with the onions. Sauté for 4-5 minutes, stirring often. The peppers should be al dente—cooked, but with a little crunch left in them.

3 Add the garlic, and sauté another 1-2 minutes. Sprinkle a little more salt over everything and add the sugar and dried oregano. Cook 1 minute. Add the diced tomatoes, and cook just one minute further.

4 Turn off the heat and mix in the torn basil. Grind some black pepper over everything. Right before serving squeeze a little lemon juice over the dish.

AVOCADO, GREEN PEPPER AND TOMATO SALAD, from Martha Stewart Meatless

1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil

Juice of 1/2 lime

1 small garlic clove, minced

Pinch of cayenne pepper

Coarse salt

1 firm, ripe avocado, halved and pitted

1/2 yellow bell pepper, ribs and seeds removed, diced

6 cherry tomatoes, halved

1 scallion, trimmed and thinly sliced

1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves, plus whole leaves for garnish

Preparation

1. In a small bowl, whisk together olive oil, lime juice, garlic, and cayenne. Season with salt.

2. Scoop out flesh from avocado halves, reserving shells, and chop. Transfer to a bowl and add bell pepper, tomatoes, scallion, and chopped cilantro.

3. Drizzle with dressing and season with salt. Gently stir to combine. Spoon mixture into reserved shells. Garnish with whole cilantro leaves and serve immediately.


 
Aug
08
    
Posted (Lori) in News
Kale
http://www.chycsa.org/2017/06/two-great-kale-salads-from-jill-and-liz/
http://www.chycsa.org/page/2/?s=kale&x=7&y=7
Rosemary
http://www.chycsa.org/2017/06/using-rosemary/.
FENNEL
http://www.chycsa.org/2017/07/fennel/
http://www.chycsa.org/2017/07/week-7-alisons-summer-vegetable-strata-jills-ratatouille-anastasias-steamed-fennel-salmon-and-garlicscape-snap-pea-and-fennel-risotto/
Ingredients
Nutrition
SERVINGS?4
UNITS?US
2 ?teaspoons olive oil
4 ?cups thinly sliced fennel bulbs (about 1/4-3/8 inch thick)
2 1?2?cups sliced onions (half moons)
1 ?cup red bell pepper, strips
3?4?cup vegetable broth or 3?4 cup fat free chicken broth or 3?4 cup water
1?4?teaspoon salt
1?4?teaspoon fennel seed
1?8?teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper
1 -2 ?garlic clove, minced
2 -3 ?tablespoons thinly sliced basil
1 1?2?tablespoons chopped fennel leaves
Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add fennel, onion, and bell pepper and saute 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. You want to make sure all of the veggies get a chance to be on the bottom of the pan. At this stage, you will have a little bit of caramelization, but if you see too much browning your heat is probably too high.
Place the fennel seeds on a cutting board and gently press on them with the back of a chef’s knife or rolling pin. You want to lightly break the seeds to release their flavor but not break them to bits or powder. Add broth, fennel seed, salt, pepper, and garlic. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in basil and fennel fronds.

Caramelized Fennel, from PutneyFarm.com (adapted from Chez

Panisse Vegetables)

KALE
ROSEMARY
FENNEL
BRAISED FENNEL WITH ONIONS AND PEPPERS
From Food.com
SERVINGS: ?4
2 ?teaspoons olive oil
4 ?cups thinly sliced fennel bulbs (about 1/4-3/8 inch thick)
2 1?2?cups sliced onions (half moons)
1 ?cup red bell pepper, strips
3?4?cup vegetable broth or 3?4 cup fat free chicken broth or 3?4 cup water
1?4?teaspoon salt
1?4?teaspoon fennel seed
1?8?teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper
1 -2 ?garlic clove, minced
2 -3 ?tablespoons thinly sliced basil
1 1?2?tablespoons chopped fennel leaves
Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add fennel, onion, and bell pepper and saute 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. You want to make sure all of the veggies get a chance to be on the bottom of the pan. At this stage, you will have a little bit of caramelization, but if you see too much browning your heat is probably too high.
Place the fennel seeds on a cutting board and gently press on them with the back of a chef’s knife or rolling pin. You want to lightly break the seeds to release their flavor but not break them to bits or powder. Add broth, fennel seed, salt, pepper, and garlic. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in basil and fennel fronds.
CARAMELIZED FENNEL
from PutneyFarm.com (adapted from Chez Panisse Vegetables)
  • 2 Large fennel bulbs
  • ¼ Cup olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Black pepper
  • ½ Lemon
  1. Using a very sharp knife, cut the top and bottom from the fennel bulbs and then remove tough or bruised outer layers. You will end up with a bulb about the size of your fist.
  2. Slice the bulbs in half and then remove the cores from the fennel. Then cut the fennel lengthwise into 1/8 inch slices (it is ok if a little thicker).
  3. Heat a large skillet or sauté pan over medium-high heat. When hot, add the olive oil and then the fennel slices. Spread the fennel out in the pan to encourage browning.
  4. Cook for 10-12 minutes, flipping the fennel slices every few minutes, until golden brown.
  5. Remove the fennel from the pan and drain off any excess oil. Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice, to taste. Serve.